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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: Ho, Christine
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2013

    We analyse the impact of the early 1990s welfare waivers and the 1996 TANF reform in the United States on at-risk mothers' labour supply behaviour using the PSID. We find that whereas the welfare waivers had limited impacts on at-risk mothers, the TANF reform played an important role in encouraging those mothers to increase their labour supply at the intensive margin. (author abstract) 

    We analyse the impact of the early 1990s welfare waivers and the 1996 TANF reform in the United States on at-risk mothers' labour supply behaviour using the PSID. We find that whereas the welfare waivers had limited impacts on at-risk mothers, the TANF reform played an important role in encouraging those mothers to increase their labour supply at the intensive margin. (author abstract) 

  • Individual Author: Berkman, Michael; Honaker, James; Ojeda, Christopher; Plutzer, Eric
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2013

    In this paper we offer measures of state TANF policies that reflect the multi-dimensionality of state policy, and account for the intergovernmental complexity that underlies TANF. Our approach recognizes each state’s motivation to transition its poor population from public assistance to employment by focusing on the conditions recipients must meet to remain on assistance and to avoid being sanctioned for violating the conditions of assistance. We also offer some validity tests of these new measures and compare them with other widely used measures of state TANF policy. Our measures are not comprehensive—we do not in this paper, for example, offer measures of generosity or eligibility—but they do capture the state rules that guide local policymakers’ sanctioning decisions. [author introduction]

     

    In this paper we offer measures of state TANF policies that reflect the multi-dimensionality of state policy, and account for the intergovernmental complexity that underlies TANF. Our approach recognizes each state’s motivation to transition its poor population from public assistance to employment by focusing on the conditions recipients must meet to remain on assistance and to avoid being sanctioned for violating the conditions of assistance. We also offer some validity tests of these new measures and compare them with other widely used measures of state TANF policy. Our measures are not comprehensive—we do not in this paper, for example, offer measures of generosity or eligibility—but they do capture the state rules that guide local policymakers’ sanctioning decisions. [author introduction]

     

  • Individual Author: Muennig, Peter; Rosen, Zohn; Wilde, Ty
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2013

    During the 1990s reforms to the US welfare system introduced new time limits on people’s eligibility to receive public assistance. These limits were developed to encourage welfare recipients to seek employment. Little is known about how such social policy programs may have affected participants’ health. We explored whether the Florida Family Transition Program randomized trial, a welfare reform experiment, led to long-term changes in mortality among participants. The Florida program included a 24–36-month time limit for welfare participation, intensive job training, and placement assistance. We linked 3,224 participants from the experiment to 17–18 years of prospective mortality follow-up data and found that participants in the program experienced a 16 percent higher mortality rate than recipients of traditional welfare. If our results are generalizable to national welfare reform efforts, they raise questions about whether the cost savings associated with welfare reform justify the additional loss of life. (author abstract)

    During the 1990s reforms to the US welfare system introduced new time limits on people’s eligibility to receive public assistance. These limits were developed to encourage welfare recipients to seek employment. Little is known about how such social policy programs may have affected participants’ health. We explored whether the Florida Family Transition Program randomized trial, a welfare reform experiment, led to long-term changes in mortality among participants. The Florida program included a 24–36-month time limit for welfare participation, intensive job training, and placement assistance. We linked 3,224 participants from the experiment to 17–18 years of prospective mortality follow-up data and found that participants in the program experienced a 16 percent higher mortality rate than recipients of traditional welfare. If our results are generalizable to national welfare reform efforts, they raise questions about whether the cost savings associated with welfare reform justify the additional loss of life. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Cox, Ron
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2012

    Eradicating poverty in the United States has eluded policymakers, researchers, and analysts for the past 50 years. After initial decreases  during the 1960s and early 1970s, poverty rates have remained stubbornly stable, wavering from 11% to 15% of the population (Gabe, 2012). Government programs have largely met with only limited success despite investing billions of dollars each year. Recently, a conceptual framework that more seamlessly integrates community and government agencies to form a comprehensive effort against poverty has gained momentum (Kania & Kramer, 2011). Informing this effort have been research findings from the social sciences that have established the decline of two-parent families through divorce and unwed childbearing as an underlying causal agent of poverty. Fueled by these findings, lawmakers made the promotion of healthy marriages and responsible fatherhood a central component of the 1996 Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity (PRWORA). This research brief examines the rationale behind a framework of integration, the effectiveness of healthy...

    Eradicating poverty in the United States has eluded policymakers, researchers, and analysts for the past 50 years. After initial decreases  during the 1960s and early 1970s, poverty rates have remained stubbornly stable, wavering from 11% to 15% of the population (Gabe, 2012). Government programs have largely met with only limited success despite investing billions of dollars each year. Recently, a conceptual framework that more seamlessly integrates community and government agencies to form a comprehensive effort against poverty has gained momentum (Kania & Kramer, 2011). Informing this effort have been research findings from the social sciences that have established the decline of two-parent families through divorce and unwed childbearing as an underlying causal agent of poverty. Fueled by these findings, lawmakers made the promotion of healthy marriages and responsible fatherhood a central component of the 1996 Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity (PRWORA). This research brief examines the rationale behind a framework of integration, the effectiveness of healthy marriage and as an intervention, and recent attempts to integrate healthy marriage and relationship education into Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) programs. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Forster, Hilary; Rolston, Howard; Gueron, Judith; Haskins, Ron; Winstead, Don; Greenberg, Mark; Maynard, Rebecca
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2014

    Welfare is often touted as the area where rigorous social science research has been most sustained and has had the clearest impact on policy. Roundtable panelists will reflect on the history of this research, discussing questions including: Why were randomized experiments sustained over 40 years? What questions did this research answer well? How did the research inform and influence legislation, policy, and practice at the national and state levels? To what extent are lessons relevant to social policy research today and to other fields? What can be done to promote such rigorous research? Rebecca Maynard (University of Pennsylvania) will moderate this session, and Mark Greenberg (Administration for Children and Families) will serve as a discussant. Panelists are:

    • Howard Rolston (Abt Associates)

    • Judith Gueron (Independent Scholar)

    • Ron Haskins (The Brookings Institution)

    • Don Winstead (Don Winstead Consulting, LLC) (conference program description)

    This presentation was given at the 2014 Welfare Research and Evaluation Conference (WREC).

    Welfare is often touted as the area where rigorous social science research has been most sustained and has had the clearest impact on policy. Roundtable panelists will reflect on the history of this research, discussing questions including: Why were randomized experiments sustained over 40 years? What questions did this research answer well? How did the research inform and influence legislation, policy, and practice at the national and state levels? To what extent are lessons relevant to social policy research today and to other fields? What can be done to promote such rigorous research? Rebecca Maynard (University of Pennsylvania) will moderate this session, and Mark Greenberg (Administration for Children and Families) will serve as a discussant. Panelists are:

    • Howard Rolston (Abt Associates)

    • Judith Gueron (Independent Scholar)

    • Ron Haskins (The Brookings Institution)

    • Don Winstead (Don Winstead Consulting, LLC) (conference program description)

    This presentation was given at the 2014 Welfare Research and Evaluation Conference (WREC).

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