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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Nicoli, Lisa Thiebaud; Logan, Letitia; Born, Catherine
    Reference Type:
    Year: 2012

    This 2012 annual update to Maryland’s landmark, legislatively mandated Life after Welfare research series comes more than three years after the official end of the Great Recession. Tens of millions of Americans, however, are still feeling the recession’s repercussions daily, largely because unemployment remains high. Even highly-educated adults are having a hard time finding work, and the labor market facing younger adults, persons of color, and those with a high school education or less is even more difficult. Perhaps the most telling indicator of our shared distress is that, today, an unprecedented one in every seven Americans receives help to put food on the table through the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program. (author abstract)

    This 2012 annual update to Maryland’s landmark, legislatively mandated Life after Welfare research series comes more than three years after the official end of the Great Recession. Tens of millions of Americans, however, are still feeling the recession’s repercussions daily, largely because unemployment remains high. Even highly-educated adults are having a hard time finding work, and the labor market facing younger adults, persons of color, and those with a high school education or less is even more difficult. Perhaps the most telling indicator of our shared distress is that, today, an unprecedented one in every seven Americans receives help to put food on the table through the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Ribar, David C.; Edelhoch, Marilyn; Liu, Qiduan
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2008

    We use administrative data to examine how “clock” policies—program time limits and recurring deadlines for confirming eligibility—affected participation in South Carolina’s TANF and Food Stamp Programs from 1996–2003. South Carolina’s TANF program limits most families to two years of benefits in any ten-year period; so, recipients began exhausting their eligibility as early as 1998. The state’s Food Stamp Program sets regular recertification intervals that can be distinguished from other calendar effects and increased these intervals after October 2002. We find that the two-year time limit reduced TANF caseloads and that the longer recertification intervals increased food stamp caseloads. (author abstract)                 

    We use administrative data to examine how “clock” policies—program time limits and recurring deadlines for confirming eligibility—affected participation in South Carolina’s TANF and Food Stamp Programs from 1996–2003. South Carolina’s TANF program limits most families to two years of benefits in any ten-year period; so, recipients began exhausting their eligibility as early as 1998. The state’s Food Stamp Program sets regular recertification intervals that can be distinguished from other calendar effects and increased these intervals after October 2002. We find that the two-year time limit reduced TANF caseloads and that the longer recertification intervals increased food stamp caseloads. (author abstract)                 

  • Individual Author: Mills, Bradford; Dorai-Raj, Sundar; Peterson, Everett; Alwang, Jeffrey
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2001

    This article examines factors that influence Food Stamp Program exits and finds that families who leave the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program are also more likely to leave the Food Stamp Program. However, the influence of TANF departure is smaller in states with larger TANF caseload declines. The results also suggest that many families leaving the Food Stamp Program are still eligible for benefits. These families may have poor information on food stamps eligibility in the face of TANF departure or may view Food Stamp Program reauthorization procedures as too costly relative to program benefits. (author abstract)

    This article examines factors that influence Food Stamp Program exits and finds that families who leave the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program are also more likely to leave the Food Stamp Program. However, the influence of TANF departure is smaller in states with larger TANF caseload declines. The results also suggest that many families leaving the Food Stamp Program are still eligible for benefits. These families may have poor information on food stamps eligibility in the face of TANF departure or may view Food Stamp Program reauthorization procedures as too costly relative to program benefits. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Hunter, Tamara; Santhiveeran, Janaki
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2005

    Experiences of food insufficiencies, inadequate access to health care, and housing-related hardships represent how financial strain negatively impacts the entire family. The purpose of this study was to examine experiences of material hardships by TANF leavers and to understand factors that are associated with experiences of material hardship. This study examined the material hardships of TANF leavers using the 1999 National Survey of America's Families. Data for 220 families who exited TANF in 1997 were extracted. The majority of TANF leavers (53.2%) reported worrying about food, which was ranked as the number one hardship. Voluntary leavers tended to experience housing-related hardships more than involuntary leavers did. When compared to White leavers, other ethnic groups experienced a higher percentage of housing and healthcare-related hardships. (author abstract)

    Experiences of food insufficiencies, inadequate access to health care, and housing-related hardships represent how financial strain negatively impacts the entire family. The purpose of this study was to examine experiences of material hardships by TANF leavers and to understand factors that are associated with experiences of material hardship. This study examined the material hardships of TANF leavers using the 1999 National Survey of America's Families. Data for 220 families who exited TANF in 1997 were extracted. The majority of TANF leavers (53.2%) reported worrying about food, which was ranked as the number one hardship. Voluntary leavers tended to experience housing-related hardships more than involuntary leavers did. When compared to White leavers, other ethnic groups experienced a higher percentage of housing and healthcare-related hardships. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Sacks, Vanessa; McGill, Brittany; Seefeldt, Kristin; Clum, Kim
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2016

    This video from the 2016 Research and Evaluation Conference on Self-Sufficiency contains a breakout session focusing on disconnected families--those in which adults are neither working nor receiving cash assistance. Panelists discussed the characteristics and circumstances of these families and barriers they face to self-sufficiency.

    This video from the 2016 Research and Evaluation Conference on Self-Sufficiency contains a breakout session focusing on disconnected families--those in which adults are neither working nor receiving cash assistance. Panelists discussed the characteristics and circumstances of these families and barriers they face to self-sufficiency.

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