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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Nicoli, Lisa Thiebaud; Logan, Letitia; Born, Catherine
    Reference Type:
    Year: 2012

    This 2012 annual update to Maryland’s landmark, legislatively mandated Life after Welfare research series comes more than three years after the official end of the Great Recession. Tens of millions of Americans, however, are still feeling the recession’s repercussions daily, largely because unemployment remains high. Even highly-educated adults are having a hard time finding work, and the labor market facing younger adults, persons of color, and those with a high school education or less is even more difficult. Perhaps the most telling indicator of our shared distress is that, today, an unprecedented one in every seven Americans receives help to put food on the table through the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program. (author abstract)

    This 2012 annual update to Maryland’s landmark, legislatively mandated Life after Welfare research series comes more than three years after the official end of the Great Recession. Tens of millions of Americans, however, are still feeling the recession’s repercussions daily, largely because unemployment remains high. Even highly-educated adults are having a hard time finding work, and the labor market facing younger adults, persons of color, and those with a high school education or less is even more difficult. Perhaps the most telling indicator of our shared distress is that, today, an unprecedented one in every seven Americans receives help to put food on the table through the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Ribar, David C.; Edelhoch, Marilyn; Liu, Qiduan
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2008

    We use administrative data to examine how “clock” policies—program time limits and recurring deadlines for confirming eligibility—affected participation in South Carolina’s TANF and Food Stamp Programs from 1996–2003. South Carolina’s TANF program limits most families to two years of benefits in any ten-year period; so, recipients began exhausting their eligibility as early as 1998. The state’s Food Stamp Program sets regular recertification intervals that can be distinguished from other calendar effects and increased these intervals after October 2002. We find that the two-year time limit reduced TANF caseloads and that the longer recertification intervals increased food stamp caseloads. (author abstract)                 

    We use administrative data to examine how “clock” policies—program time limits and recurring deadlines for confirming eligibility—affected participation in South Carolina’s TANF and Food Stamp Programs from 1996–2003. South Carolina’s TANF program limits most families to two years of benefits in any ten-year period; so, recipients began exhausting their eligibility as early as 1998. The state’s Food Stamp Program sets regular recertification intervals that can be distinguished from other calendar effects and increased these intervals after October 2002. We find that the two-year time limit reduced TANF caseloads and that the longer recertification intervals increased food stamp caseloads. (author abstract)                 

  • Individual Author: Cook, John T.; Skalicky, Anne
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2002

    This report summarizes the association of welfare sanctions--benefits terminated or reduced for failure to comply with behavioral requirements--with the health and food security of children younger than 3 years of age in 6 large U.S. cities (Baltimore, Boston, Little Rock, Los Angeles, Minneapolis, and Washington, D.C.). Information for the report includes data collected through the Children's Sentinel Nutrition Assessment Program (C-SNAP). The C-SNAP involved a sentinel sample of caregivers of infants and toddlers presenting at pediatric emergency rooms and primary care services for non-life- threatening conditions. Eligible caregivers were interviewed regarding the child's and parent's health, household demographics, use of public assistance programs, and food security. The main findings are summarized as follows: (1) welfare sanctions and benefits decrease are associated with significantly increased rates of hospitalizations for young children, and these effects were not altered by receipt of food stamp or WIC benefits; (2) welfare sanctions are associated with significantly...

    This report summarizes the association of welfare sanctions--benefits terminated or reduced for failure to comply with behavioral requirements--with the health and food security of children younger than 3 years of age in 6 large U.S. cities (Baltimore, Boston, Little Rock, Los Angeles, Minneapolis, and Washington, D.C.). Information for the report includes data collected through the Children's Sentinel Nutrition Assessment Program (C-SNAP). The C-SNAP involved a sentinel sample of caregivers of infants and toddlers presenting at pediatric emergency rooms and primary care services for non-life- threatening conditions. Eligible caregivers were interviewed regarding the child's and parent's health, household demographics, use of public assistance programs, and food security. The main findings are summarized as follows: (1) welfare sanctions and benefits decrease are associated with significantly increased rates of hospitalizations for young children, and these effects were not altered by receipt of food stamp or WIC benefits; (2) welfare sanctions are associated with significantly increased rates of food insecurity in households of young children; (3) in Boston and Minneapolis, infants and toddlers in 2001 had approximately a 40 percent higher risk of food insecurity compared to 1999, a 30 percent higher risk of being underweight, and a 50 percent higher risk of being hospitalized during an emergency room visit. The report's three appendices provide additional detail on the study's methodology, the food security questions, and a description of welfare sanction policies. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Goerge, Robert M. ; Reidy, Mairead; Lyons, Sandra; Chin, Meejung; Harris, Allison
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2004

    This paper evaluates factors affecting the decision by families that leave the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program to participate in the Food Stamp Program (FSP). Linked Illinois State-level administrative data are combined with Census data and data from the Illinois Families Study survey to evaluate the FSP take-up decision of TANF leavers 3 years after leaving the welfare rolls. Results indicate that in Chicago, neighborhood characteristics and knowledge of FSP eligibility at the district office level are important factors in understanding the FSP participation decision of TANF leavers even after individual or family level demographic characteristics are taken into account. This evidence suggests that the density
    of social networks among the food-stamp-eligible population in the district office areas may mediate the effects of office outreach and communication strategies. (author abstract)

    This paper evaluates factors affecting the decision by families that leave the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program to participate in the Food Stamp Program (FSP). Linked Illinois State-level administrative data are combined with Census data and data from the Illinois Families Study survey to evaluate the FSP take-up decision of TANF leavers 3 years after leaving the welfare rolls. Results indicate that in Chicago, neighborhood characteristics and knowledge of FSP eligibility at the district office level are important factors in understanding the FSP participation decision of TANF leavers even after individual or family level demographic characteristics are taken into account. This evidence suggests that the density
    of social networks among the food-stamp-eligible population in the district office areas may mediate the effects of office outreach and communication strategies. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Polit, Denise F.; London, Andrew S.; Martinez, John M.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2000

    Despite the strength of the American economy in the past few years, food insecurity and hunger continue to affect millions of American families. Drawing on 1998-1999 survey and ethnographic data from the Urban Change study (a multicomponent study of the implementation and effects of welfare reform in four large cities), this paper describes the food security of mother-headed families who were living in highly disadvantaged urban neighborhoods and who had received or were currently receiving cash welfare benefits. The families of four groups of women were compared: those who, at the time of the interview, worked and were no longer receiving welfare; those who combined welfare and work; nonworking welfare recipients; and those who neither worked nor were then receiving welfare. The survey results indicated that food insecurity in the prior year was high in all groups. Overall, about half the families were food insecure, and hunger was found in slightly more than 15 percent of the families. Moreover, in nearly one-third of the families there were food hardships that affected the...

    Despite the strength of the American economy in the past few years, food insecurity and hunger continue to affect millions of American families. Drawing on 1998-1999 survey and ethnographic data from the Urban Change study (a multicomponent study of the implementation and effects of welfare reform in four large cities), this paper describes the food security of mother-headed families who were living in highly disadvantaged urban neighborhoods and who had received or were currently receiving cash welfare benefits. The families of four groups of women were compared: those who, at the time of the interview, worked and were no longer receiving welfare; those who combined welfare and work; nonworking welfare recipients; and those who neither worked nor were then receiving welfare. The survey results indicated that food insecurity in the prior year was high in all groups. Overall, about half the families were food insecure, and hunger was found in slightly more than 15 percent of the families. Moreover, in nearly one-third of the families there were food hardships that affected the children’s diets. Food insecurity was most prevalent among families where the mother had neither employment income nor welfare benefits. Food insecurity was lowest among the families where the mothers were working and no longer getting welfare, but even in this group 44.5 percent were food insecure, and nearly 15 percent had experienced hunger. Data from in-depth ethnographic interviews indicate that, in this population, women who are food secure nevertheless expend considerable energy piecing together strategies to ensure that there is an adequate amount of food available for themselves and their children. (Author abstract)

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