Skip to main content
Back to Top

SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

  • Conduct a search and filter parameters as desired.
  • "Check" the box next to the resources for which you would like a citation.
  • Select "Download Selected Citation" at the top of the Library Search Page.
  • Select your export style:
    • Text File.
    • RIS Format.
    • APA format.
  • Select submit and download your citations.

The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Burke, Mike; Sims, Kate; Anderson, Signe; FirtzSimons, Crystal; Hewins, Jessie
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2013

    When the school year ends, millions of low-income children lose access to the school breakfasts and lunches they rely on during the school year. The federal Summer Nutrition Programs—the Summer Food Service Program (SFSP) and the National School Lunch Program (NSLP)—are designed to replace the regular school year programs, providing low-income children access to the nutritious meals they need to keep hunger at bay and remain healthy throughout the summer. The meals provided through the Summer Nutrition Programs also play an important role in drawing children into educational, enrichment, and recreational programming that keep them learning, engaged, active, safe, and moving during school vacation. (author abstract)

    When the school year ends, millions of low-income children lose access to the school breakfasts and lunches they rely on during the school year. The federal Summer Nutrition Programs—the Summer Food Service Program (SFSP) and the National School Lunch Program (NSLP)—are designed to replace the regular school year programs, providing low-income children access to the nutritious meals they need to keep hunger at bay and remain healthy throughout the summer. The meals provided through the Summer Nutrition Programs also play an important role in drawing children into educational, enrichment, and recreational programming that keep them learning, engaged, active, safe, and moving during school vacation. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Schirm, Allen; Kirkendall, Nancy
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2012

    The National School Lunch and School Breakfast Programs, administered by the Food and Nutrition Service (FNS) of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), are key components of the nation's food security safety net, providing free or low-cost meals to millions of schoolchildren each day. To qualify their children each year for free or reduced-price meals, many families must submit applications that school officials distribute and review. To reduce this burden on families and schools and to encourage more children to partake of nutritious meals, USDA regulations allow school districts to operate their meals programs under special provisions that eliminate the application process and other administrative procedures in exchange for providing free meals to all students enrolled in one or more school in a district.

    FNS asked the National Academies' Committee on National Statistics and Food and Nutrition Board to convene a panel of experts to investigate the technical and operational feasibility of using data from the continuous American Community Survey (ACS) to estimate...

    The National School Lunch and School Breakfast Programs, administered by the Food and Nutrition Service (FNS) of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), are key components of the nation's food security safety net, providing free or low-cost meals to millions of schoolchildren each day. To qualify their children each year for free or reduced-price meals, many families must submit applications that school officials distribute and review. To reduce this burden on families and schools and to encourage more children to partake of nutritious meals, USDA regulations allow school districts to operate their meals programs under special provisions that eliminate the application process and other administrative procedures in exchange for providing free meals to all students enrolled in one or more school in a district.

    FNS asked the National Academies' Committee on National Statistics and Food and Nutrition Board to convene a panel of experts to investigate the technical and operational feasibility of using data from the continuous American Community Survey (ACS) to estimate students eligible for free and reduced-price meals for schools and school districts. The ACS eligibility estimates would be used to develop "claiming percentages" that, if sufficiently accurate, would determine the USDA reimbursements to districts for schools that provided free meals to all students under a new special provision that eliminated the ongoing base-year requirements of current provisions.

    Using American Community Survey Data to Expand Access to the School Meals Program was conducted in two phases. It first issued an interim report (National Research Council, 2010), describing its planned approach for assessing the utility of ACS-based estimates for a special provision to expand access to free school meals. This report is the final phase which presents the panel's findings and recommendations. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Edelstein, Sara; Isaacs, Julia; Hahn, Heather; Toran, Katherine
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2012

    Federal, state, and local government investments in children vary by age. This report examines 2011 federal spending and 2008 total government spending on children age 0-2, 3-5, 6-11, and 12-18. We find that state and local governments provide three-quarters of total public investments in children age 6 and older, while the federal government provides three-quarters of investments in children age 0-2 and about half of investments in age 3-5. Total public spending is highest for school-age children, but federal spending is highest for the youngest children. These findings suggest that investments at all levels of government matter for children. (author abstract)

    Federal, state, and local government investments in children vary by age. This report examines 2011 federal spending and 2008 total government spending on children age 0-2, 3-5, 6-11, and 12-18. We find that state and local governments provide three-quarters of total public investments in children age 6 and older, while the federal government provides three-quarters of investments in children age 0-2 and about half of investments in age 3-5. Total public spending is highest for school-age children, but federal spending is highest for the youngest children. These findings suggest that investments at all levels of government matter for children. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Gleason, Philip M.; Dodd, Allison Hedley
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2009

    BACKGROUND:

    Rates of overweight and obesity have increased dramatically during the past 2 decades. Children obtain a large fraction of their food energy while at school.

    OBJECTIVE:

    To estimate the relationship between participation in school meal programs and children's body mass index (BMI) and their likelihood of being overweight or obese, testing the hypothesis that school meal participation influences students' weight status, as measured by their BMI and indicators of overweight and obesity.

    DESIGN:

    A cross-sectional design in which a regression model was used to estimate the association between participation in the School Breakfast Program and National School Lunch Program and children's BMI and risk of overweight or obesity, controlling for a wide range of student and school characteristics.

    SUBJECTS/SETTING:

    Participants included a nationally representative sample from the third School Nutrition Dietary Assessment Study of 2,228 students in grades 1 through 12 for whom height and weight measurements were obtained. These...

    BACKGROUND:

    Rates of overweight and obesity have increased dramatically during the past 2 decades. Children obtain a large fraction of their food energy while at school.

    OBJECTIVE:

    To estimate the relationship between participation in school meal programs and children's body mass index (BMI) and their likelihood of being overweight or obese, testing the hypothesis that school meal participation influences students' weight status, as measured by their BMI and indicators of overweight and obesity.

    DESIGN:

    A cross-sectional design in which a regression model was used to estimate the association between participation in the School Breakfast Program and National School Lunch Program and children's BMI and risk of overweight or obesity, controlling for a wide range of student and school characteristics.

    SUBJECTS/SETTING:

    Participants included a nationally representative sample from the third School Nutrition Dietary Assessment Study of 2,228 students in grades 1 through 12 for whom height and weight measurements were obtained. These students, along with their parents, each completed a survey.

    STATISTICAL ANALYSES PERFORMED:

    Multivariate regression models were used to examine the relationship between usual school meal participation and BMI and indicators of whether students were overweight or obese. These models controlled for students' demographic and socioeconomic characteristics, levels of physical activity, usual eating habits, screen time, and school characteristics.

    RESULTS:

    No evidence was found of any relationship between usual school lunch participation and any of four different measures of weight status based on students' BMI. School breakfast participation was associated with significantly lower BMI, particularly among non-Hispanic, white students.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    There was no evidence that either the school breakfast or lunch program is contributing to rising rates of childhood obesity. In fact, School Breakfast Program participation may be a protective factor, by encouraging students to consume breakfast more regularly. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Gordon, Anne; Crepinsek, Mary Kay; Nogales, Renee; Condon, Elizabeth
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2007

    The Food and Nutrition Service (FNS) of USDA has sponsored the third School Nutrition Dietary Assessment study (SNDA-III) to provide up-to-date information on the school meal programs, the school environments that affect the food programs, the nutrient content of school meals, and the contributions of school meals to children’s diets. The study builds on the methods used in two previous SNDA studies sponsored by FNS and, thus, allows some examination of trends over time. Mathematica Policy Research, Inc. (MPR) was awarded contracts by FNS to collect and analyze the study data and produce reports.

    This report, the first of three volumes, focuses on the analysis of school meal program characteristics at the school level, as well as at the level of the School Food Authority (SFA) (usually a school district or a small group of districts that sponsors the school meal programs). A second volume focuses on characteristics of students who participate in school meals, student and parent satisfaction with the meals, and descriptions of the dietary intakes of schoolchildren. A third...

    The Food and Nutrition Service (FNS) of USDA has sponsored the third School Nutrition Dietary Assessment study (SNDA-III) to provide up-to-date information on the school meal programs, the school environments that affect the food programs, the nutrient content of school meals, and the contributions of school meals to children’s diets. The study builds on the methods used in two previous SNDA studies sponsored by FNS and, thus, allows some examination of trends over time. Mathematica Policy Research, Inc. (MPR) was awarded contracts by FNS to collect and analyze the study data and produce reports.

    This report, the first of three volumes, focuses on the analysis of school meal program characteristics at the school level, as well as at the level of the School Food Authority (SFA) (usually a school district or a small group of districts that sponsors the school meal programs). A second volume focuses on characteristics of students who participate in school meals, student and parent satisfaction with the meals, and descriptions of the dietary intakes of schoolchildren. A third volume provides in-depth information on the sample design and data collection procedures used in the study. (author abstract)

Sort by

Topical Area(s)

Popular Searches

Source

Year

Year ranges from 1946 to 2018

Reference Type

Research Methodology

Geographic Focus

Target Populations