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SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: U.S. Congress
    Reference Type: Statute
    Year: 1935

    This statute established the U.S. Social Security system.  It provided benefits to the disabled and unemployed and included titles relating to social supports for the elderly, the blind, women and children, as well as established the Aid to Families with Dependent Children program. 

    This statute established the U.S. Social Security system.  It provided benefits to the disabled and unemployed and included titles relating to social supports for the elderly, the blind, women and children, as well as established the Aid to Families with Dependent Children program. 

  • Individual Author: Sama-Miller, Emily; Makowsky, Libby; Rowe, Gretchen; Brown, Elizabeth; Clary, Elizabeth; Castner, Laura; Satake, Miki
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2014

    This study reports on a project launched in 2010 to pilot and evaluate innovative strategies to reduce SNAP participation barriers for low-income elderly by leveraging new data-sharing requirements related to Medicare assistance programs that help pay for prescription drugs or Medicare premiums. SNAP accesses the medical assistance program data and contacts those individuals that appear SNAP eligible. Grants were awarded to New Mexico, Pennsylvania, and Washington. (author abstract)

    This study reports on a project launched in 2010 to pilot and evaluate innovative strategies to reduce SNAP participation barriers for low-income elderly by leveraging new data-sharing requirements related to Medicare assistance programs that help pay for prescription drugs or Medicare premiums. SNAP accesses the medical assistance program data and contacts those individuals that appear SNAP eligible. Grants were awarded to New Mexico, Pennsylvania, and Washington. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Brucker, Debra L.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2016

    Background

    Prior research has suggested that young adults with disabilities face economic, health, and social disadvantage. Food security, an area of disadvantage that can influence overall health, has not been fully explored for this population.

    Objective/hypothesis

    To examine levels of food security between young adults with and without disabilities, controlling for individual characteristics.

    Methods

    Logistic regression analysis of a nationally representative sample of young adults (ages 18–25) (n = 32,795) with and without disabilities, using pooled data form the 2011–2013 National Health Interview Survey.

    Results

    Young adults with disabilities have significantly higher odds (OR: 2.58, p < 0.001) of living in a household that is food insecure than young adults without disabilities, even when controlling for individual characteristics. Odds of living in a household that is food insecure are particularly high (OR: 5.35, p < 0.001) among young adults with high levels of psychological distress, controlling for other factors...

    Background

    Prior research has suggested that young adults with disabilities face economic, health, and social disadvantage. Food security, an area of disadvantage that can influence overall health, has not been fully explored for this population.

    Objective/hypothesis

    To examine levels of food security between young adults with and without disabilities, controlling for individual characteristics.

    Methods

    Logistic regression analysis of a nationally representative sample of young adults (ages 18–25) (n = 32,795) with and without disabilities, using pooled data form the 2011–2013 National Health Interview Survey.

    Results

    Young adults with disabilities have significantly higher odds (OR: 2.58, p < 0.001) of living in a household that is food insecure than young adults without disabilities, even when controlling for individual characteristics. Odds of living in a household that is food insecure are particularly high (OR: 5.35, p < 0.001) among young adults with high levels of psychological distress, controlling for other factors.

    Conclusions

    Young adults with disabilities have increased odds of living in a household that is food insecure. This study has important policy and community program implications. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Sonik, Rajan; Parish, Susan L.; Ghosh, Subharati; Igdalsky, Leah
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2016

    The authors examined food insecurity in households including children with disabilities, analyzing data from the 2004 and 2008 panels of the Survey of Income and Program Participation, which included 24,729 households with children, 3,948 of which had children with disabilities. Logistic regression models were used to estimate the likelihood of food insecurity after adjusting for adult disability status, income, and other sociodemographic factors. Compared to other households with children, those including children with disabilities were more likely to report household food insecurity of any kind, very low household food security, and child food insecurity. Families raising children with disabilities were also more likely to receive Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program benefits. These results suggest that children with disabilities face an increased risk of experiencing food insecurity and that there is a pressing need to improve the safety net system for these children. (Author abstract)

    The authors examined food insecurity in households including children with disabilities, analyzing data from the 2004 and 2008 panels of the Survey of Income and Program Participation, which included 24,729 households with children, 3,948 of which had children with disabilities. Logistic regression models were used to estimate the likelihood of food insecurity after adjusting for adult disability status, income, and other sociodemographic factors. Compared to other households with children, those including children with disabilities were more likely to report household food insecurity of any kind, very low household food security, and child food insecurity. Families raising children with disabilities were also more likely to receive Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program benefits. These results suggest that children with disabilities face an increased risk of experiencing food insecurity and that there is a pressing need to improve the safety net system for these children. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Meisenheimer, Melanie
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2015

    Poverty, hunger, and food insecurity disproportionately affect Americans who have communicative, mental, or physical disabilities. In this report, FRAC examines SNAP’s role among programs to assist people with disabilities as well as rules and policies that make SNAP accessible and responsive. It also looks at current law to  provide recommendations on how to strengthen SNAP’s support for people with disabilities through state policy options, agency practices, and outreach. (Author introduction)

     

    Poverty, hunger, and food insecurity disproportionately affect Americans who have communicative, mental, or physical disabilities. In this report, FRAC examines SNAP’s role among programs to assist people with disabilities as well as rules and policies that make SNAP accessible and responsive. It also looks at current law to  provide recommendations on how to strengthen SNAP’s support for people with disabilities through state policy options, agency practices, and outreach. (Author introduction)

     

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