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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: Wiedrich, Kasey; Griffin, Kate; Chilton, Mariana; Lehman, Gretchen
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2014

    Studies show that low-income families are more likely to be unbanked and “underbanked” than families with higher earnings. Lacking a bank account or depending on alternative financial services leads to significant financial barriers for low-income families that hinder economic growth and social mobility. This session will evaluate strategies that local and state human services agencies are testing to equip TANF recipients with the financial knowledge and resources they need to overcome barriers to financial security, including ACF’s Asset Initiative Partnership. Gretchen Lehman (Administration for Children and Families) will moderate this session.

    • Financial Counseling and Financial Access for the Financially Vulnerable

    Kasey Wiedrich (Corporation for Enterprise Development)

    The presentation examines financial management strategies among low-income families.  Two research studies are described: Children's HealthWatch and Witnesses to Hunger.

    • Building Economic Self-Sufficiency of TANF Clients Through Financial Education and Matched Savings

    ...

    Studies show that low-income families are more likely to be unbanked and “underbanked” than families with higher earnings. Lacking a bank account or depending on alternative financial services leads to significant financial barriers for low-income families that hinder economic growth and social mobility. This session will evaluate strategies that local and state human services agencies are testing to equip TANF recipients with the financial knowledge and resources they need to overcome barriers to financial security, including ACF’s Asset Initiative Partnership. Gretchen Lehman (Administration for Children and Families) will moderate this session.

    • Financial Counseling and Financial Access for the Financially Vulnerable

    Kasey Wiedrich (Corporation for Enterprise Development)

    The presentation examines financial management strategies among low-income families.  Two research studies are described: Children's HealthWatch and Witnesses to Hunger.

    • Building Economic Self-Sufficiency of TANF Clients Through Financial Education and Matched Savings

    Kate Griffin (Corporation for Enterprise Development)

    The presentation describes data from a financial education program for TANF recipients that provides training in budgeting and credit management.  The pilot was started in July 2013 with the Utah Department of Workforce Services.

    • Financial Management Strategies of TANF and SNAP Recipients: Lessons for Policy Makers and Administrators

    Mariana Chilton (Drexel University)

    The presentation describes a completed research project that looks at the impact of the AFCO financial counseling program for families leaving TANF and entering into a work-ready context.

    These presentations were given at the 2014 Welfare Research and Evaluation Conference (WREC).

  • Individual Author: Acs, Greg; Schwabish, Jonathan A.
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2011

    This study uses data from the 1996 and 2004 panels of the Survey of Income and Program Participation (SIPP) to examine the relationship between work and the Food Stamp Program and assesses how that relationship changed pursuant to major changes to the program codified in the Food Security and Rural Investment Act of 2002. A central goal behind these changes was to make it easier for low-income working households to receive food stamps. The study finds that the share of adults (ages 19 to 55) in low-income households participating in the Food Stamp Program (FSP) fell from 23 percent in 1996 to 20 percent in 2004. Among those receiving food stamps, about 40 percent combined food stamps and work in both 1996 and 2004. Recipients who combine food stamps and work in the same four month period are substantially more likely to exit the program and exit the program with earnings than adults who do not mix food stamps and work. Further, the likelihood of exiting the FSP was greater during the 1996-1999 period than during the 2004-2007 period, even after taking the characteristics of...

    This study uses data from the 1996 and 2004 panels of the Survey of Income and Program Participation (SIPP) to examine the relationship between work and the Food Stamp Program and assesses how that relationship changed pursuant to major changes to the program codified in the Food Security and Rural Investment Act of 2002. A central goal behind these changes was to make it easier for low-income working households to receive food stamps. The study finds that the share of adults (ages 19 to 55) in low-income households participating in the Food Stamp Program (FSP) fell from 23 percent in 1996 to 20 percent in 2004. Among those receiving food stamps, about 40 percent combined food stamps and work in both 1996 and 2004. Recipients who combine food stamps and work in the same four month period are substantially more likely to exit the program and exit the program with earnings than adults who do not mix food stamps and work. Further, the likelihood of exiting the FSP was greater during the 1996-1999 period than during the 2004-2007 period, even after taking the characteristics of recipients and macroeconomic conditions into account. (author abstract)

    This is a paper that was presented at the IRP Summer Research Workshop in June 2011.

  • Individual Author: Tiehen, Laura; Jolliffe, Dean; Smeeding, Timothy
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2013

    This paper systematically reviews the work on the antipoverty effect of SNAP using administrative and survey data. We found the antipoverty effects are even larger than those found in Census Bureau estimates if one adjusts for underreporting. Using re-weighting methods to benchmark the CPS to administrative data, the antipoverty effects are then almost again as large as without them. With underreporting adjustments, and depending on the poverty measure being considered, SNAP reduces poverty by 14 to 16 percent. We conclude that SNAP is our nation's most effective antipoverty program for the non-elderly when adjusted for underreporting, and it is especially good at reducing extreme poverty—by over 50 percent—and also especially effective for poor families with children. (author abstract)

    This paper was also published as a working paper by the University of Kentucky Center for Poverty Research.

    This paper systematically reviews the work on the antipoverty effect of SNAP using administrative and survey data. We found the antipoverty effects are even larger than those found in Census Bureau estimates if one adjusts for underreporting. Using re-weighting methods to benchmark the CPS to administrative data, the antipoverty effects are then almost again as large as without them. With underreporting adjustments, and depending on the poverty measure being considered, SNAP reduces poverty by 14 to 16 percent. We conclude that SNAP is our nation's most effective antipoverty program for the non-elderly when adjusted for underreporting, and it is especially good at reducing extreme poverty—by over 50 percent—and also especially effective for poor families with children. (author abstract)

    This paper was also published as a working paper by the University of Kentucky Center for Poverty Research.

  • Individual Author: Jun, Zhang; Yen, Steven
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2014

    The roles of Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) and parental resources in household food insecurity are investigated with a endogenous ordered probability model. Data for husband-wife families with children from the 2010 and 2011 Current Population Survey are used. SNAP participation is found to reduce the probability of household food insecurity among adults by 8.8%,increases the probability of being low food security among children by 6.1%,and increases the probability of being very low food security among children by 2.7%.Parental resource and socio-demographic variables also play important roles in determining SNAP participation and household food insecurity. (author abstract) 

    The roles of Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) and parental resources in household food insecurity are investigated with a endogenous ordered probability model. Data for husband-wife families with children from the 2010 and 2011 Current Population Survey are used. SNAP participation is found to reduce the probability of household food insecurity among adults by 8.8%,increases the probability of being low food security among children by 6.1%,and increases the probability of being very low food security among children by 2.7%.Parental resource and socio-demographic variables also play important roles in determining SNAP participation and household food insecurity. (author abstract) 

  • Individual Author: Monte, Lindsay M.
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2014

    The Great Recession, which officially lasted from late 2007 into 2009, is known to have had a detrimental effect on the economic wellbeing of many American families. However, we also know that certain sub-populations were more affected by the recession than others (Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2012). In this analysis, I ask whether multiple partner fertility families were one such group. I use the 2004 and 2008 Survey of Income and Program Participation (SIPP) panels to examine correlates of economic wellbeing, particularly differences in poverty and program use, before and during the Great Recession. I ask whether, controlling for other factors, families with multiple partner fertility were more susceptible to the negative repercussions of the Great Recession than were other families. Multiple partner fertility (MPF) is defined as having children with more than one partner, and is much more prevalent among low-income parents than it is among other parents. About a third of all parents have MPF, while about 60 percent of low-income parents do (Carlson & Furstenberg, 2006). We...

    The Great Recession, which officially lasted from late 2007 into 2009, is known to have had a detrimental effect on the economic wellbeing of many American families. However, we also know that certain sub-populations were more affected by the recession than others (Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2012). In this analysis, I ask whether multiple partner fertility families were one such group. I use the 2004 and 2008 Survey of Income and Program Participation (SIPP) panels to examine correlates of economic wellbeing, particularly differences in poverty and program use, before and during the Great Recession. I ask whether, controlling for other factors, families with multiple partner fertility were more susceptible to the negative repercussions of the Great Recession than were other families. Multiple partner fertility (MPF) is defined as having children with more than one partner, and is much more prevalent among low-income parents than it is among other parents. About a third of all parents have MPF, while about 60 percent of low-income parents do (Carlson & Furstenberg, 2006). We know that fertility, and particularly MPF, has implications for economic outcomes (Lichter, 1997; Monte, 2011). However, we also know that many of the same factors that predict poverty predict MPF (see, for example, Guzzo & Furstenberg, 2007b). Given this, it is perhaps unsurprising that MPF and poverty are so highly correlated. What we do not know is whether MPF puts families at disproportionate risk when confronted with economic shocks. In this analysis, controlling for the demographic correlates of both poverty and MPF, I explore whether the Great Recession was disproportionately associated with higher rates of poverty and social program uptake for MPF families than for single partner fertility (SPF) families within a nationally representative sample. (author introduction)

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