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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Martins, Diane C.; Gorman, Kathleen S.; Miller, Robin J.; Murphy, Leah; Sor, Sekboppa; Martins, Jonah C.; Vecchiarelli, Maria L.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2015

    Objective: The objective of this study was to examine the relationship between the nutritional status, incidence of food insecurity, and health risk among the homeless population in Rhode Island.

    Design and Sample: This correlational study utilized a convenience sample of 319 homeless adults from Rhode Island's largest service agency for the homeless. Information on use of services such as access to emergency foods, shelters, and the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) was requested.

    Measures: Food security was measured by the six-item subset of the USDA Food Security Core Module. Anthropometric measures included height, weight, and waist circumference. A 24-hr dietary recall was collected to determine the food intake for a subset of participants who agreed to supply this information (n = 197).

    Conclusion: Average dietary recall data indicated insufficient intake of vegetables, fruit, dairy, and meats/beans. It also indicated excessive intake of fats. Of the 313 participants, 29.4% were overweight and 39% were obese. Over 94% of the participants...

    Objective: The objective of this study was to examine the relationship between the nutritional status, incidence of food insecurity, and health risk among the homeless population in Rhode Island.

    Design and Sample: This correlational study utilized a convenience sample of 319 homeless adults from Rhode Island's largest service agency for the homeless. Information on use of services such as access to emergency foods, shelters, and the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) was requested.

    Measures: Food security was measured by the six-item subset of the USDA Food Security Core Module. Anthropometric measures included height, weight, and waist circumference. A 24-hr dietary recall was collected to determine the food intake for a subset of participants who agreed to supply this information (n = 197).

    Conclusion: Average dietary recall data indicated insufficient intake of vegetables, fruit, dairy, and meats/beans. It also indicated excessive intake of fats. Of the 313 participants, 29.4% were overweight and 39% were obese. Over 94% of the participants were food insecure, with 64% of this subset experiencing hunger. Fifty-five percent of the participants were currently receiving SNAP benefits. The majority of the sample was found to be food insecure with hunger. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Giesen, Lindsay; Isaacs, Julia
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2013

    The presentation describes Work Support Strategies, an effort piloted by six states to increase families' enrollment in the full package work supports and aid states in more efficiently and effectively delivering benefits (e.g., Medicaid/CHIP, SNAP, child care subsidies).  Lessons learned from the first year of implementation are presented along with strategies states developed to address challenges.

    This presentation was given at the 2013 National Association of Welfare Research and Statistics (NAWRS) Annual Workshop.

    The presentation describes Work Support Strategies, an effort piloted by six states to increase families' enrollment in the full package work supports and aid states in more efficiently and effectively delivering benefits (e.g., Medicaid/CHIP, SNAP, child care subsidies).  Lessons learned from the first year of implementation are presented along with strategies states developed to address challenges.

    This presentation was given at the 2013 National Association of Welfare Research and Statistics (NAWRS) Annual Workshop.

  • Individual Author: Edin, Kathryn; Boyd, Melody; Malbi, James; Ohls, Jim; Worthington, Julie; Greene, Sara; Redel, Nicholas; Sridharan, Swetha
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2013

    The in-depth interviews discussed in this report consist of detailed discussions with 90 SNAP households with children in 6 States (California, Illinois, Indiana, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and Texas) about their financial situations, their use of SNAP, and their overall food security. Interview questions focused on household expenditures and income, SNAP and food shopping habits, eating habits, nutrition, triggers of food hardship, and food-related coping strategies. (author abstract) 

    The in-depth interviews discussed in this report consist of detailed discussions with 90 SNAP households with children in 6 States (California, Illinois, Indiana, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and Texas) about their financial situations, their use of SNAP, and their overall food security. Interview questions focused on household expenditures and income, SNAP and food shopping habits, eating habits, nutrition, triggers of food hardship, and food-related coping strategies. (author abstract) 

  • Individual Author: Hahn, Heather; Kassabian, David
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2013

    Work Support Strategies (WSS) is a multiyear, multi-state initiative to implement reforms that help eligible low-income families get and keep a full package of work support benefits, including Medicaid, nutrition assistance (SNAP), and child care assistance. This report describes Rhode Island's accomplishments and lessons learned during the initiative's first year. During this year, the state engaged frontline workers, state leaders and community stakeholders, built close connections with the state’s health reform activities around design of a new eligibility system, identified opportunities for data system improvements and to align eligibility and enrollment requirements and implemented relevant policy changes. (author abstract)

    Work Support Strategies (WSS) is a multiyear, multi-state initiative to implement reforms that help eligible low-income families get and keep a full package of work support benefits, including Medicaid, nutrition assistance (SNAP), and child care assistance. This report describes Rhode Island's accomplishments and lessons learned during the initiative's first year. During this year, the state engaged frontline workers, state leaders and community stakeholders, built close connections with the state’s health reform activities around design of a new eligibility system, identified opportunities for data system improvements and to align eligibility and enrollment requirements and implemented relevant policy changes. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Mauricio, Kaili
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2013

    The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) helps feed struggling families throughout the United States. Since the recession, the number of households in New England receiving SNAP benefits, instead of declining as the economy recovers, has increased dramatically. Nationwide, the number of households receiving SNAP benefits increased 34 percent from 2009 to 2011, while over the same period, New England saw a 41 percent increase. Bristol County, Rhode Island, led New England growth, more than doubling (146 percent increase) the number of households. The only county in New England to see a decline was Franklin County, Maine (–9 percent).

    In terms of absolute percentages, New England is in line with the national figures, at 11 percent of all households receiving SNAP benefits. Eight of the 10 counties with the highest household SNAP usage (percent) are in Maine. The state’s Aroostook, Somerset, and Washington counties have the three highest household SNAP rates in New England at 22.7 percent, 23.0 percent and 23.8 percent respectively. The pattern of growth in...

    The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) helps feed struggling families throughout the United States. Since the recession, the number of households in New England receiving SNAP benefits, instead of declining as the economy recovers, has increased dramatically. Nationwide, the number of households receiving SNAP benefits increased 34 percent from 2009 to 2011, while over the same period, New England saw a 41 percent increase. Bristol County, Rhode Island, led New England growth, more than doubling (146 percent increase) the number of households. The only county in New England to see a decline was Franklin County, Maine (–9 percent).

    In terms of absolute percentages, New England is in line with the national figures, at 11 percent of all households receiving SNAP benefits. Eight of the 10 counties with the highest household SNAP usage (percent) are in Maine. The state’s Aroostook, Somerset, and Washington counties have the three highest household SNAP rates in New England at 22.7 percent, 23.0 percent and 23.8 percent respectively. The pattern of growth in households receiving SNAP benefits has shown that while the recovery has affected some parts of the economy, households in New England continue to struggle. (author abstract)

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