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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Jarrett, Robin L.; Bahar, Ozge S.; Odoms-Young, Angela
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2014

    This article examines the experiences of food shortages among a sample of low-income, African American caregivers of preschoolers and how they coped with the risk of inadequate food supplies. Data derived from qualitative interviews identified multiple food-based, social network-based, and institution-based strategies that caregivers used to alleviate or prevent food shortages. The configuration of strategies varied among households and reflected different approaches for coping with inadequate food supplies. Highlighting the resilience of low-income families, these findings expand on current research that misses the complex and diverse ways households coped with food shortages. The research also suggests strength-based interventions grounded in the firsthand experiences of households. (author abstract)

    This article examines the experiences of food shortages among a sample of low-income, African American caregivers of preschoolers and how they coped with the risk of inadequate food supplies. Data derived from qualitative interviews identified multiple food-based, social network-based, and institution-based strategies that caregivers used to alleviate or prevent food shortages. The configuration of strategies varied among households and reflected different approaches for coping with inadequate food supplies. Highlighting the resilience of low-income families, these findings expand on current research that misses the complex and diverse ways households coped with food shortages. The research also suggests strength-based interventions grounded in the firsthand experiences of households. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: DePolt, Richard A.; Moffitt, Robert A.; Ribar, David C.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2009

    We examine how participation in the Food Stamp and Temporary Assistance for Needy Families Programs is associated with self-reported household food hardships, using data from a longitudinal survey of low-income families living in Boston, Chicago and San Antonio. In addition to the measures of hardships and program participation, the survey includes measures of income, wealth, social resources, disability, physical health and family structure, measures that help us to account for selection between recipient and non-recipient households. For our multivariate analyses, we estimate multiple indicator multiple cause models that are modified to incorporate discrete outcome variables and to account for longitudinal data. Estimates from these models reveal that participation in the Food Stamp Program is associated with fewer food hardships, while participation in the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families program has no detectable association with hardships. (Author abstract)

    We examine how participation in the Food Stamp and Temporary Assistance for Needy Families Programs is associated with self-reported household food hardships, using data from a longitudinal survey of low-income families living in Boston, Chicago and San Antonio. In addition to the measures of hardships and program participation, the survey includes measures of income, wealth, social resources, disability, physical health and family structure, measures that help us to account for selection between recipient and non-recipient households. For our multivariate analyses, we estimate multiple indicator multiple cause models that are modified to incorporate discrete outcome variables and to account for longitudinal data. Estimates from these models reveal that participation in the Food Stamp Program is associated with fewer food hardships, while participation in the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families program has no detectable association with hardships. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Reed, Monique; Dancy, Barbara; Holm, Karyn; Wilbur, JoEllen; Fogg, Louis
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2013

    African American (AA) girls aged 10–12 living in urban communities designated as food deserts have a significantly greater prevalence of overweight and obesity than girls that age in the general population. The purpose of our study was (a) to examine the agreement in nutritional intake between AA girls aged 10–12 and their mothers and (b) to determine if the girls’ weight categories were associated with their or their mothers demographic characteristics, eating behaviors, nutritional intake, and health problem. A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted in predominantly low-income AA communities in Chicago. Forty-three dyads of early adolescent AA girls and their mothers responded to food frequency and eating habits questionnaires. There was a strong and significant correlation between mother’s and daughter’s kilocalories consumed (r = .61). Our study suggests that interventions aimed at improving eating behaviors in early adolescent AA girls should include their mothers. (author abstract)

    African American (AA) girls aged 10–12 living in urban communities designated as food deserts have a significantly greater prevalence of overweight and obesity than girls that age in the general population. The purpose of our study was (a) to examine the agreement in nutritional intake between AA girls aged 10–12 and their mothers and (b) to determine if the girls’ weight categories were associated with their or their mothers demographic characteristics, eating behaviors, nutritional intake, and health problem. A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted in predominantly low-income AA communities in Chicago. Forty-three dyads of early adolescent AA girls and their mothers responded to food frequency and eating habits questionnaires. There was a strong and significant correlation between mother’s and daughter’s kilocalories consumed (r = .61). Our study suggests that interventions aimed at improving eating behaviors in early adolescent AA girls should include their mothers. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Blackston, Christina
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2012

    Beginning with a list of retail outlets on Chicago’s Far South Side that accept SNAP benefits, this study groups stores into three classifications: all stores selling food, grocery stores and supermarkets, and chain supermarkets. By conducting site visits as well as calling stores, a method was developed to classify a store as either a “grocery store or supermarket” or “other” based on whether the store sells fresh meat and produce.

    After plotting the location of the chain supermarkets on a map of census tracts using ArcMap, supermarket accessibility by public transportation was modeled to show which destinations could feasibly be reached given different trip times. Overall, having a census tract with a high percentage of food stamp recipients was the best predictor of poor supermarket access. This finding has implications for federal policy, as public benefits are made less effective when consumers are forced to pay higher prices because they cannot access stores that offer the lowest prices, or when recipients cannot access healthy food.

    This study analyzes the...

    Beginning with a list of retail outlets on Chicago’s Far South Side that accept SNAP benefits, this study groups stores into three classifications: all stores selling food, grocery stores and supermarkets, and chain supermarkets. By conducting site visits as well as calling stores, a method was developed to classify a store as either a “grocery store or supermarket” or “other” based on whether the store sells fresh meat and produce.

    After plotting the location of the chain supermarkets on a map of census tracts using ArcMap, supermarket accessibility by public transportation was modeled to show which destinations could feasibly be reached given different trip times. Overall, having a census tract with a high percentage of food stamp recipients was the best predictor of poor supermarket access. This finding has implications for federal policy, as public benefits are made less effective when consumers are forced to pay higher prices because they cannot access stores that offer the lowest prices, or when recipients cannot access healthy food.

    This study analyzes the presence of supermarkets, grocery stores, and other types of retail food outlets on Chicago’s Far South Side. It takes into account existing studies of food deserts and seeks to assess the ability of public transportation to ameliorate food deserts. This paper demonstrates that transportation should enter the definition of a food desert and analyzes how food deserts should be assessed as a range of inequality in food access, rather than on a binary scale. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Moffitt, Robert A.; Ribar, David C.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2016

    A long literature in economics concerns itself with differential allocations of resources to different children within the family unit. In a study of approximately 1,500 very disadvantaged families with children in Boston, Chicago, and San Antonio from 1999 to 2005, significant differences in levels of food allocation, as measured by an indicator of food “insecurity,” are found across children of different ages and genders. Using answers to unique survey questions for a specific child in the family, food insecurity levels are found to be much higher among older boys and girls than among younger ones, and to be sometimes higher among older boys than among older girls. Differential allocations are strongly correlated with the dietary and nutritional needs of the child. However, the differences in allocation appear only in the poorest families with the lowest levels of money income and family resources in general, and most differences disappear in significance or are greatly reduced in magnitude when resources rise to only modest levels. Differences in food insecurity across...

    A long literature in economics concerns itself with differential allocations of resources to different children within the family unit. In a study of approximately 1,500 very disadvantaged families with children in Boston, Chicago, and San Antonio from 1999 to 2005, significant differences in levels of food allocation, as measured by an indicator of food “insecurity,” are found across children of different ages and genders. Using answers to unique survey questions for a specific child in the family, food insecurity levels are found to be much higher among older boys and girls than among younger ones, and to be sometimes higher among older boys than among older girls. Differential allocations are strongly correlated with the dietary and nutritional needs of the child. However, the differences in allocation appear only in the poorest families with the lowest levels of money income and family resources in general, and most differences disappear in significance or are greatly reduced in magnitude when resources rise to only modest levels. Differences in food insecurity across different types of children therefore appear to be a problem primarily only among the worst-off families. (Author abstract)

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