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SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Cooper, Rachel; Anderson, Signe; FitzSimons, Crystal
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2012

    Summer vacation should be a carefree time for children, but for millions of low-income students, summer vacation brings an end to the healthy, filling meals on which they rely, and their families lack the resources to make up the deficit. The federally-funded Summer Nutrition Programs, which can provide nutritious meals and snacks to low-income children during the summer months, in summer 2011 only fed one in seven of the low-income students who depended on the National School Lunch Program during the regular 2010-2011 school year. The limited reach of the Summer Nutrition Programs meant that millions of low-income children and their parents spent the summer struggling to avoid going hungry. (author abstract)

    Summer vacation should be a carefree time for children, but for millions of low-income students, summer vacation brings an end to the healthy, filling meals on which they rely, and their families lack the resources to make up the deficit. The federally-funded Summer Nutrition Programs, which can provide nutritious meals and snacks to low-income children during the summer months, in summer 2011 only fed one in seven of the low-income students who depended on the National School Lunch Program during the regular 2010-2011 school year. The limited reach of the Summer Nutrition Programs meant that millions of low-income children and their parents spent the summer struggling to avoid going hungry. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Nord, Mark; Andrews, Margaret ; Carlson, Steven
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2009

    Eighty-five percent of American households were food secure throughout the entire year in 2008, meaning that they had access at all times to enough food for an active, healthy life for all household members. The remaining households (14.6 percent) were food insecure at least some time during the year, including 5.7 percent with very low food security— meaning that the food intake of one or more household members was reduced and their eating patterns were disrupted at times during the year because the household lacked money and other resources for food. Prevalence rates of food insecurity and very low food security were up from 11.1 percent and 4.1 percent, respectively, in 2007, and were the highest recorded since 1995, when the first national food security survey was conducted. The typical food-secure household spent 31 percent more on food than the typical food-insecure household of the same size and household composition. Fifty-five percent of all food-insecure households participated in one or more of the three largest Federal food and nutrition assistance programs during the...

    Eighty-five percent of American households were food secure throughout the entire year in 2008, meaning that they had access at all times to enough food for an active, healthy life for all household members. The remaining households (14.6 percent) were food insecure at least some time during the year, including 5.7 percent with very low food security— meaning that the food intake of one or more household members was reduced and their eating patterns were disrupted at times during the year because the household lacked money and other resources for food. Prevalence rates of food insecurity and very low food security were up from 11.1 percent and 4.1 percent, respectively, in 2007, and were the highest recorded since 1995, when the first national food security survey was conducted. The typical food-secure household spent 31 percent more on food than the typical food-insecure household of the same size and household composition. Fifty-five percent of all food-insecure households participated in one or more of the three largest Federal food and nutrition assistance programs during the month prior to the 2008 survey. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Horning, Melissa L. ; Fulkerson, Jayne A.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2015

    Objectives: As obesity rates remain alarmingly high, the importance of healthful diets is emphasized; however, affordability of such diets is disputed. Market basket surveys (MBSs) investigate the affordability of diets for families that meet minimum daily dietary requirements using actual food prices from grocery stores. This review paper describes the methods of MBSs, summarizes methodology, price and affordability findings, limitations, and suggests related policy and practice implications. Design and Sample: This is a systematic review of 16 MBSs performed in the United States from 1985 to 2012. A comprehensive multidisciplinary database search strategy was used to identify articles meeting inclusion criteria. Results: Results indicated MBS methodology varied across studies and price data indicated healthful diets for families are likely unaffordable when purchased from small- to medium-sized stores and may be unaffordable in larger stores when compared to the Thrifty Food Plan. Conclusions: Using a social ecological approach, public health nurses and all public health...

    Objectives: As obesity rates remain alarmingly high, the importance of healthful diets is emphasized; however, affordability of such diets is disputed. Market basket surveys (MBSs) investigate the affordability of diets for families that meet minimum daily dietary requirements using actual food prices from grocery stores. This review paper describes the methods of MBSs, summarizes methodology, price and affordability findings, limitations, and suggests related policy and practice implications. Design and Sample: This is a systematic review of 16 MBSs performed in the United States from 1985 to 2012. A comprehensive multidisciplinary database search strategy was used to identify articles meeting inclusion criteria. Results: Results indicated MBS methodology varied across studies and price data indicated healthful diets for families are likely unaffordable when purchased from small- to medium-sized stores and may be unaffordable in larger stores when compared to the Thrifty Food Plan. Conclusions: Using a social ecological approach, public health nurses and all public health professionals are prime advocates for increased affordability of healthful foods. This study includes policy advocacy, particularly in support of Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program benefits for low-income families. Future research implications are provided, including methodological recommendations for consistency and quality of forthcoming MBS research. (Author abstract)