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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: Dickert-Conlin, Stacy; Fitzpatrick, Katie; Tiehen, Laura
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2012

    In 2004 the U.S. Department of Agriculture began a large-scale advertising campaign to increase participation in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) by increasing awareness about the program. Despite this and other large-scale outreach efforts for federal programs targeted at eligible nonparticipants, the role of information in program participation is not well established. Paying careful attention to the potential endogeneity of advertising placement, we use variation over time and within states to estimate the effect of the advertising on caseloads, applications, approved applications, and denied applications. We find that radio advertisements are positively correlated with county-level caseloads in a sample that represents nearly every U.S. county. Six months after radio advertising in a county, the number of individuals receiving SNAP is 2 to 3 percent higher. With a smaller sample of counties on SNAP applications, approvals, and denials, we find limited evidence that SNAP is positively correlated with overall applications. However, approved applications are...

    In 2004 the U.S. Department of Agriculture began a large-scale advertising campaign to increase participation in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) by increasing awareness about the program. Despite this and other large-scale outreach efforts for federal programs targeted at eligible nonparticipants, the role of information in program participation is not well established. Paying careful attention to the potential endogeneity of advertising placement, we use variation over time and within states to estimate the effect of the advertising on caseloads, applications, approved applications, and denied applications. We find that radio advertisements are positively correlated with county-level caseloads in a sample that represents nearly every U.S. county. Six months after radio advertising in a county, the number of individuals receiving SNAP is 2 to 3 percent higher. With a smaller sample of counties on SNAP applications, approvals, and denials, we find limited evidence that SNAP is positively correlated with overall applications. However, approved applications are not higher following radio advertisement exposure and denied applications increase. One way to reconcile the fact that caseloads are higher but new enrollments are not is that increased information from the advertising campaign may reduce exits from the program. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Weber, Bruce A.; Duncan, Greg J.; Whitener, Leslie A.
    Reference Type: Book Chapter/Book
    Year: 2002

    This volume presents a comprehensive look at how welfare reforms enacted in 1996 are affecting caseloads, employment, earnings, and family well-being in rural areas. (author abstract)

    Contents

    Introduction: As the Dust Settles: Welfare Reform and Rural America / Leslie A. Whitener, Bruce A. Weber, Greg Duncan

    1. Approaching the Limit: Early National Lessons from Welfare Reform / Sheldon Danziger
    2. Rural Labor Markets in an Era of Welfare Reform / Robert M. Gibbs
    3. Rural America in Transition: Poverty and Welfare at the Turn of the Twenty-First Century / Daniel T. Lichter, Leif Jensen
    4. Reducing Food Stamp and Welfare Caseloads in the South: Are Rural Areas Less Likely to Succeed than Urban Centers? / Mark Henry, Lynn Reinschmiedt, Willis Lewis, Darren Hudson
    5. Seasonal Employment Dynamics and Welfare Use in Agricultural and Rural California Counties / Henry E. Brady, Mary Sprague, Fredric C. Gey, Michael Wiseman
    6. Location and the Low-Income Experience: Analyses of Program Dynamics in the Iowa Family Investment Program...

    This volume presents a comprehensive look at how welfare reforms enacted in 1996 are affecting caseloads, employment, earnings, and family well-being in rural areas. (author abstract)

    Contents

    Introduction: As the Dust Settles: Welfare Reform and Rural America / Leslie A. Whitener, Bruce A. Weber, Greg Duncan

    1. Approaching the Limit: Early National Lessons from Welfare Reform / Sheldon Danziger
    2. Rural Labor Markets in an Era of Welfare Reform / Robert M. Gibbs
    3. Rural America in Transition: Poverty and Welfare at the Turn of the Twenty-First Century / Daniel T. Lichter, Leif Jensen
    4. Reducing Food Stamp and Welfare Caseloads in the South: Are Rural Areas Less Likely to Succeed than Urban Centers? / Mark Henry, Lynn Reinschmiedt, Willis Lewis, Darren Hudson
    5. Seasonal Employment Dynamics and Welfare Use in Agricultural and Rural California Counties / Henry E. Brady, Mary Sprague, Fredric C. Gey, Michael Wiseman
    6. Location and the Low-Income Experience: Analyses of Program Dynamics in the Iowa Family Investment Program / Helen H. Jensen, Shao-Hsun Keng, Steven Garasky
    7. Small Towns and Welfare Reform: Iowa Case Studies of Families and Communities / Cynthia Needles Fletcher, Jan L. Flora, Barbara J. Gaddis, Mary Winter, Jacquelyn S. Litt
    8. Where all the Counties are above Average: Human Service Agency Directors' Perspectives on Welfare Reform / Ann Tickamyer, Julie White, Barry Tadlock, Debra Henderson
    9. The impact of Welfare Policy on the Employment of Single Mothers Living in Rural and Urban Areas / Signe-Mary McKernan, Robert Lerman, Nancy Pindus, Jesse Valente
    10. Welfare Reform in Rural Minnesota: Experimental Findings from the Minnesota Family Investment Program / Lisa A. Gennetian, Cindy Redcross, and Cynthia Miller
    11. Will Attainable Jobs be Available for TANF Recipients in Local Labor Markets? Evidence from Mississippi on Prospects for "Job-Skill Matching" of TANF Adults / Frank M. Howell
    12. Whose Job Is It? Employers' Views on Welfare Reform / Ellen Shelton, Greg Owen, Amy Bush Stevens, Justine Nelson-Christinedaughter, Corinna Roy, June Heineman
    13. The Short-Term Impacts of Welfare Reform in Persistently Poor Rural Areas / Mark Harvey, Gene F. Summers, Kathleen Pickering, Patricia Richards
    14. Food Stamps in Rural America: Special Issues and Common Themes / Sheena McConnell, James Ohls
    15. The Decline in Food Stamp Use by Rural Low-Income Households: Less Need or Less Access? / Mark Nord
    16. Lessons Learned: Welfare Reform and Food Assistance in Rural America / Greg Duncan, Leslie A. Whitener, Bruce A. Weber
  • Individual Author: Kropf, Mary; Holben, David ; Holcomb, John ; Anderson, Heidi
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2007

    This study identified differences between women from the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) and WIC/Farmers’ Market Nutrition Program participating households regarding household food security status, fruit and vegetable intake and behaviors, perceived diet quality, and education level; and assessed the relationship between household food security status and perceived diet quality and perceived health. Farmers’ Market Nutrition Program participants exhibit more indicators of a healthful diet, but appear not to be more food secure. Nutrition education regarding the benefits of fresh produce intake can help to improve diet quality and increase Farmers’ Market Nutrition Program participation. (author abstract)

    This study identified differences between women from the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) and WIC/Farmers’ Market Nutrition Program participating households regarding household food security status, fruit and vegetable intake and behaviors, perceived diet quality, and education level; and assessed the relationship between household food security status and perceived diet quality and perceived health. Farmers’ Market Nutrition Program participants exhibit more indicators of a healthful diet, but appear not to be more food secure. Nutrition education regarding the benefits of fresh produce intake can help to improve diet quality and increase Farmers’ Market Nutrition Program participation. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Kirlin, John A.; Cole, Nancy; Logan, Christopher; Kaufman, Phillip
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2003

    The Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) provides both nutrition education and supplemental foods for pregnant, breastfeeding, and post-partum women, infants, and children. These supplemental foods contain nutrients that nutritional research has found may otherwise be lacking in the diets of WIC recipients. State WIC agencies have implemented practices designed to reduce the cost of food packages containing these prescribed foods. For instance, one of the WIC program's primary cost-saving practices is negotiating rebate contracts with manufacturers of infant formula. Additional practices include limiting authorized vendors to stores with lower food prices; limiting approved brands, package sizes, forms, or prices; and negotiating rebates with food manufacturers or suppliers. There is concern that these practices may inadvertently counter the program's goal of providing supplemental foods and nutrition education. Based on a review of cost-containment practices in six States, including interviews with the various stakeholders and analysis of...

    The Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) provides both nutrition education and supplemental foods for pregnant, breastfeeding, and post-partum women, infants, and children. These supplemental foods contain nutrients that nutritional research has found may otherwise be lacking in the diets of WIC recipients. State WIC agencies have implemented practices designed to reduce the cost of food packages containing these prescribed foods. For instance, one of the WIC program's primary cost-saving practices is negotiating rebate contracts with manufacturers of infant formula. Additional practices include limiting authorized vendors to stores with lower food prices; limiting approved brands, package sizes, forms, or prices; and negotiating rebates with food manufacturers or suppliers. There is concern that these practices may inadvertently counter the program's goal of providing supplemental foods and nutrition education. Based on a review of cost-containment practices in six States, including interviews with the various stakeholders and analysis of WIC administrative files, the study draws three major conclusions: (1) cost-containment practices reduced average food package costs by 0.2 to 21.4 percent, depending on practices implemented and local conditions; (2) the cost-containment practices had few adverse outcomes for WIC participants; and (3) administrative costs of the practices were low, averaging about 1.5 percent of food package savings. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Pavetti, LaDonna; Maloy, Kathleen; Schott, Liz
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2002

    This study, conducted by Mathematica Policy Research, Inc. and its subcontractors, American Management Systems, Inc. and the George Washington University Center for Health Services Research and Policy, was commissioned by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the U.S. Department of Agriculture to identify strategies states and local welfare offices are using to promote participation in food stamps, Medicaid and SCHIP and the ongoing challenges they face in providing support to working families. (author abstract)

    This study, conducted by Mathematica Policy Research, Inc. and its subcontractors, American Management Systems, Inc. and the George Washington University Center for Health Services Research and Policy, was commissioned by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the U.S. Department of Agriculture to identify strategies states and local welfare offices are using to promote participation in food stamps, Medicaid and SCHIP and the ongoing challenges they face in providing support to working families. (author abstract)

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