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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Whitley, Sarah
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2013

    Poverty and hunger are increasingly significant issues facing the United States. An additional trend, the consolidation in food retail, also contributes to food insecurity. This qualitative study of rural food insecure households investigates how assistance services and retail consolidation affect hunger for households in a changing rural environment. The data shows disparities exist in the amount of food assistance available based on household levels of social integration and social capital, leaving less connected residents experiencing hunger. (author abstract)

    Poverty and hunger are increasingly significant issues facing the United States. An additional trend, the consolidation in food retail, also contributes to food insecurity. This qualitative study of rural food insecure households investigates how assistance services and retail consolidation affect hunger for households in a changing rural environment. The data shows disparities exist in the amount of food assistance available based on household levels of social integration and social capital, leaving less connected residents experiencing hunger. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: De Marco, Allison
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2012

    During the Great Recession the US experienced its longest and worst recession since the Great Depression, evidenced by high unemployment, unprecedented job losses, and long-term unemployment. Particularly hard hit, in North Carolina the unemployment rate remained higher for longer than the four previous recessions (NC Employment Security Commission, 2011). This study uses data from the North Carolina sample of the Family Life Project, a representative sample of predominantly low-income, rural families oversampled for African American and low income families, to examine how the economic downturn impacted residents’ employment in the rural South and how those conditions are related to economic strain and food insecurity. There is a comparative dearth of information available on rural poverty, however, it is critical to address these issues because of disproportionate rates of poverty and limited access to services in low wealth, rural communities. We use NC data from the 36-month home visit, collected 7/06 – 10/07, to capture conditions prior to the recession and the 58-month home...

    During the Great Recession the US experienced its longest and worst recession since the Great Depression, evidenced by high unemployment, unprecedented job losses, and long-term unemployment. Particularly hard hit, in North Carolina the unemployment rate remained higher for longer than the four previous recessions (NC Employment Security Commission, 2011). This study uses data from the North Carolina sample of the Family Life Project, a representative sample of predominantly low-income, rural families oversampled for African American and low income families, to examine how the economic downturn impacted residents’ employment in the rural South and how those conditions are related to economic strain and food insecurity. There is a comparative dearth of information available on rural poverty, however, it is critical to address these issues because of disproportionate rates of poverty and limited access to services in low wealth, rural communities. We use NC data from the 36-month home visit, collected 7/06 – 10/07, to capture conditions prior to the recession and the 58-month home visit, collected 7/08 – 12/09, to capture conditions during the recession. During the recession 36% of these NC families reported a major employment change (starting/stopping a job, major changes in responsibilities, such as a promotion/demotion, significant change in hours); 23.5% went from working a standard to a nonstandard shift (evening, night, and rotating); while over 10% saw their employment become less stable, moving from permanent to temporary jobs. In regression analysis, maternal education and rurality predicted work distress. Work distress was related to increased economic strain and lead to increased use TANF, SNAP, and Unemployment Insurance. Social support and SNAP use buffered experiences of food insecurity. This knowledge will enable policy-makers to make more informed decisions about how to modify policies and programs to better match the situations present in these communities.  (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Slack, Tim; Myers, Candice A.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2012

    This study examines the extent to which geographic variation in Food Stamp Program (FSP) participation is explained by place-based factors, with special attention to the case of the three poorest regions of the United States: Central Appalachia, the Texas Borderland, and the Lower Mississippi Delta. We use descriptive statistics and regression models to assess the prevalence and correlates of county-level FSP participation circa 2005. Our findings show that the economic distress that has long characterized Appalachia, the Borderland, and the Delta clearly translates into greater reliance on the FSP relative to other areas of the country. State-level effects and local-level variations in poverty, labor market conditions, population structure, human capital, and residential context explain much of this reality. Yet, even after taking all of these factors into account, these regional geographies remain home to particularly high FSP participation. Our findings underscore the importance of considering these regions as key cases of study in the stratification of American society and...

    This study examines the extent to which geographic variation in Food Stamp Program (FSP) participation is explained by place-based factors, with special attention to the case of the three poorest regions of the United States: Central Appalachia, the Texas Borderland, and the Lower Mississippi Delta. We use descriptive statistics and regression models to assess the prevalence and correlates of county-level FSP participation circa 2005. Our findings show that the economic distress that has long characterized Appalachia, the Borderland, and the Delta clearly translates into greater reliance on the FSP relative to other areas of the country. State-level effects and local-level variations in poverty, labor market conditions, population structure, human capital, and residential context explain much of this reality. Yet, even after taking all of these factors into account, these regional geographies remain home to particularly high FSP participation. Our findings underscore the importance of considering these regions as key cases of study in the stratification of American society and hold a variety of implications for public policy. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: McConnell, Sheena; Ohls, James
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2001

    The Food Stamp Program is a cornerstone of America’s federally administered nutrition assistance to those in need. While the program serves a predominantly urban population, nearly a quarter of food stamp recipients live in rural areas and they receive just under a quarter of all food stamp benefits. In a recent study of rural-urban differences in food stamp participation, researchers found that the number of people eligible to receive food stamps declined in both urban and rural areas between 1996 and 1998. However, the participation rate—the proportion of people eligible for food stamps who participate in the program—declined in urban areas, but not in rural areas. (author abstract)

    The Food Stamp Program is a cornerstone of America’s federally administered nutrition assistance to those in need. While the program serves a predominantly urban population, nearly a quarter of food stamp recipients live in rural areas and they receive just under a quarter of all food stamp benefits. In a recent study of rural-urban differences in food stamp participation, researchers found that the number of people eligible to receive food stamps declined in both urban and rural areas between 1996 and 1998. However, the participation rate—the proportion of people eligible for food stamps who participate in the program—declined in urban areas, but not in rural areas. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Weber, Bruce A.; Duncan, Greg J.; Whitener, Leslie A.
    Reference Type: Book Chapter/Book
    Year: 2002

    This volume presents a comprehensive look at how welfare reforms enacted in 1996 are affecting caseloads, employment, earnings, and family well-being in rural areas. (author abstract)

    Contents

    Introduction: As the Dust Settles: Welfare Reform and Rural America / Leslie A. Whitener, Bruce A. Weber, Greg Duncan

    1. Approaching the Limit: Early National Lessons from Welfare Reform / Sheldon Danziger
    2. Rural Labor Markets in an Era of Welfare Reform / Robert M. Gibbs
    3. Rural America in Transition: Poverty and Welfare at the Turn of the Twenty-First Century / Daniel T. Lichter, Leif Jensen
    4. Reducing Food Stamp and Welfare Caseloads in the South: Are Rural Areas Less Likely to Succeed than Urban Centers? / Mark Henry, Lynn Reinschmiedt, Willis Lewis, Darren Hudson
    5. Seasonal Employment Dynamics and Welfare Use in Agricultural and Rural California Counties / Henry E. Brady, Mary Sprague, Fredric C. Gey, Michael Wiseman
    6. Location and the Low-Income Experience: Analyses of Program Dynamics in the Iowa Family Investment Program...

    This volume presents a comprehensive look at how welfare reforms enacted in 1996 are affecting caseloads, employment, earnings, and family well-being in rural areas. (author abstract)

    Contents

    Introduction: As the Dust Settles: Welfare Reform and Rural America / Leslie A. Whitener, Bruce A. Weber, Greg Duncan

    1. Approaching the Limit: Early National Lessons from Welfare Reform / Sheldon Danziger
    2. Rural Labor Markets in an Era of Welfare Reform / Robert M. Gibbs
    3. Rural America in Transition: Poverty and Welfare at the Turn of the Twenty-First Century / Daniel T. Lichter, Leif Jensen
    4. Reducing Food Stamp and Welfare Caseloads in the South: Are Rural Areas Less Likely to Succeed than Urban Centers? / Mark Henry, Lynn Reinschmiedt, Willis Lewis, Darren Hudson
    5. Seasonal Employment Dynamics and Welfare Use in Agricultural and Rural California Counties / Henry E. Brady, Mary Sprague, Fredric C. Gey, Michael Wiseman
    6. Location and the Low-Income Experience: Analyses of Program Dynamics in the Iowa Family Investment Program / Helen H. Jensen, Shao-Hsun Keng, Steven Garasky
    7. Small Towns and Welfare Reform: Iowa Case Studies of Families and Communities / Cynthia Needles Fletcher, Jan L. Flora, Barbara J. Gaddis, Mary Winter, Jacquelyn S. Litt
    8. Where all the Counties are above Average: Human Service Agency Directors' Perspectives on Welfare Reform / Ann Tickamyer, Julie White, Barry Tadlock, Debra Henderson
    9. The impact of Welfare Policy on the Employment of Single Mothers Living in Rural and Urban Areas / Signe-Mary McKernan, Robert Lerman, Nancy Pindus, Jesse Valente
    10. Welfare Reform in Rural Minnesota: Experimental Findings from the Minnesota Family Investment Program / Lisa A. Gennetian, Cindy Redcross, and Cynthia Miller
    11. Will Attainable Jobs be Available for TANF Recipients in Local Labor Markets? Evidence from Mississippi on Prospects for "Job-Skill Matching" of TANF Adults / Frank M. Howell
    12. Whose Job Is It? Employers' Views on Welfare Reform / Ellen Shelton, Greg Owen, Amy Bush Stevens, Justine Nelson-Christinedaughter, Corinna Roy, June Heineman
    13. The Short-Term Impacts of Welfare Reform in Persistently Poor Rural Areas / Mark Harvey, Gene F. Summers, Kathleen Pickering, Patricia Richards
    14. Food Stamps in Rural America: Special Issues and Common Themes / Sheena McConnell, James Ohls
    15. The Decline in Food Stamp Use by Rural Low-Income Households: Less Need or Less Access? / Mark Nord
    16. Lessons Learned: Welfare Reform and Food Assistance in Rural America / Greg Duncan, Leslie A. Whitener, Bruce A. Weber

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