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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Whitley, Sarah
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2013

    Poverty and hunger are increasingly significant issues facing the United States. An additional trend, the consolidation in food retail, also contributes to food insecurity. This qualitative study of rural food insecure households investigates how assistance services and retail consolidation affect hunger for households in a changing rural environment. The data shows disparities exist in the amount of food assistance available based on household levels of social integration and social capital, leaving less connected residents experiencing hunger. (author abstract)

    Poverty and hunger are increasingly significant issues facing the United States. An additional trend, the consolidation in food retail, also contributes to food insecurity. This qualitative study of rural food insecure households investigates how assistance services and retail consolidation affect hunger for households in a changing rural environment. The data shows disparities exist in the amount of food assistance available based on household levels of social integration and social capital, leaving less connected residents experiencing hunger. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Gordon, Anne; Oddo, Vanessa
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2012

    American Indians living on reservations or in other tribal areas (Indian Country) are among the most disadvantaged populations in the United States. The Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010 (HHFKA), section 141, requires the Department of Agriculture (USDA) to report to Congress on the ways that Federal nutrition programs can help overcome child hunger and nutrition problems on Indian reservations. To meet this requirement, this report addresses three questions:

    1. What is the level of food insecurity, obesity, and Type II diabetes1 among American Indian children living in Indian Country?
    2. What is the scope and reach of Federal nutrition programs in Indian Country?
    3. How can the HHFKA improve food security and reduce obesity and diabetes risk among American Indian children living in Indian Country?

    Before addressing these issues, we briefly describe the population of American Indians (AIs) as a whole and those living in Indian Country. We define AIs, in general, as those who report American Indian as their race in the U.S. Census or other national...

    American Indians living on reservations or in other tribal areas (Indian Country) are among the most disadvantaged populations in the United States. The Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010 (HHFKA), section 141, requires the Department of Agriculture (USDA) to report to Congress on the ways that Federal nutrition programs can help overcome child hunger and nutrition problems on Indian reservations. To meet this requirement, this report addresses three questions:

    1. What is the level of food insecurity, obesity, and Type II diabetes1 among American Indian children living in Indian Country?
    2. What is the scope and reach of Federal nutrition programs in Indian Country?
    3. How can the HHFKA improve food security and reduce obesity and diabetes risk among American Indian children living in Indian Country?

    Before addressing these issues, we briefly describe the population of American Indians (AIs) as a whole and those living in Indian Country. We define AIs, in general, as those who report American Indian as their race in the U.S. Census or other national surveys and are not Alaska Natives (ANs). In some instances, however, we report data on AIs and ANs together, as that is all that is available, and ANs are less than 10 percent of the combined group. Whenever not stated otherwise, we use those reporting AI or AN as their only race. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Slack, Tim; Myers, Candice A.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2012

    This study examines the extent to which geographic variation in Food Stamp Program (FSP) participation is explained by place-based factors, with special attention to the case of the three poorest regions of the United States: Central Appalachia, the Texas Borderland, and the Lower Mississippi Delta. We use descriptive statistics and regression models to assess the prevalence and correlates of county-level FSP participation circa 2005. Our findings show that the economic distress that has long characterized Appalachia, the Borderland, and the Delta clearly translates into greater reliance on the FSP relative to other areas of the country. State-level effects and local-level variations in poverty, labor market conditions, population structure, human capital, and residential context explain much of this reality. Yet, even after taking all of these factors into account, these regional geographies remain home to particularly high FSP participation. Our findings underscore the importance of considering these regions as key cases of study in the stratification of American society and...

    This study examines the extent to which geographic variation in Food Stamp Program (FSP) participation is explained by place-based factors, with special attention to the case of the three poorest regions of the United States: Central Appalachia, the Texas Borderland, and the Lower Mississippi Delta. We use descriptive statistics and regression models to assess the prevalence and correlates of county-level FSP participation circa 2005. Our findings show that the economic distress that has long characterized Appalachia, the Borderland, and the Delta clearly translates into greater reliance on the FSP relative to other areas of the country. State-level effects and local-level variations in poverty, labor market conditions, population structure, human capital, and residential context explain much of this reality. Yet, even after taking all of these factors into account, these regional geographies remain home to particularly high FSP participation. Our findings underscore the importance of considering these regions as key cases of study in the stratification of American society and hold a variety of implications for public policy. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: McConnell, Sheena; Ohls, James
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2001

    The Food Stamp Program is a cornerstone of America’s federally administered nutrition assistance to those in need. While the program serves a predominantly urban population, nearly a quarter of food stamp recipients live in rural areas and they receive just under a quarter of all food stamp benefits. In a recent study of rural-urban differences in food stamp participation, researchers found that the number of people eligible to receive food stamps declined in both urban and rural areas between 1996 and 1998. However, the participation rate—the proportion of people eligible for food stamps who participate in the program—declined in urban areas, but not in rural areas. (author abstract)

    The Food Stamp Program is a cornerstone of America’s federally administered nutrition assistance to those in need. While the program serves a predominantly urban population, nearly a quarter of food stamp recipients live in rural areas and they receive just under a quarter of all food stamp benefits. In a recent study of rural-urban differences in food stamp participation, researchers found that the number of people eligible to receive food stamps declined in both urban and rural areas between 1996 and 1998. However, the participation rate—the proportion of people eligible for food stamps who participate in the program—declined in urban areas, but not in rural areas. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Swanson, Josephine A. ; Olson, Christine M. ; Miller, Emily O. ; Lawrence, Frances C.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2008

    Much of the research on low-income families, welfare, and self-sufficiency has focused on urban populations. Further, many of the studies on informal or social support available to and accessed by low-income families addressed needs such as childcare, transportation, money, or housing and did not focus on food issues. This paper focuses on how formal government food assistance programs and informal supports are utilized by rural low-income families as they work to meet their food needs. Drawing on interviews from the multi-state ‘‘Rural Families Speak’’ project, we examine food security in relation to the use of formal and informal supports. Additional analyses address how mothers view and describe their use of support to meet food needs. (author abstract)

    Much of the research on low-income families, welfare, and self-sufficiency has focused on urban populations. Further, many of the studies on informal or social support available to and accessed by low-income families addressed needs such as childcare, transportation, money, or housing and did not focus on food issues. This paper focuses on how formal government food assistance programs and informal supports are utilized by rural low-income families as they work to meet their food needs. Drawing on interviews from the multi-state ‘‘Rural Families Speak’’ project, we examine food security in relation to the use of formal and informal supports. Additional analyses address how mothers view and describe their use of support to meet food needs. (author abstract)

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