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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: Katz, Irv; Key, Karen; James, Tara; French, Molly; Heit, Alexander
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2013

    Until communities offer multiple pathways to connect with ladders of opportunity, many young families headed by OSOW youth will be unable to achieve financial independence. To break the cycle of poverty, many human service organizations use two-generation approaches with “young families” (that is, families with children in which the parent is an OSOW young person ages 15–24 years). One hallmark of these two-generation approaches is the use of strategies that address the developmental needs of the young parents, their children, and the families as a whole. The National Human Services Assembly (NHSA), an association of America’s leading nonprofit human service providers, conducted an exploratory study of two-generation programs already in place within its member organizations. The Annie E. Casey Foundation (AECF) supported this effort, which sought to document quality two-generation programs and identify program elements that strengthen young families. The study eventually engaged 32 NHSA members and affiliates in sharing their knowledge about two-generation approaches and...

    Until communities offer multiple pathways to connect with ladders of opportunity, many young families headed by OSOW youth will be unable to achieve financial independence. To break the cycle of poverty, many human service organizations use two-generation approaches with “young families” (that is, families with children in which the parent is an OSOW young person ages 15–24 years). One hallmark of these two-generation approaches is the use of strategies that address the developmental needs of the young parents, their children, and the families as a whole. The National Human Services Assembly (NHSA), an association of America’s leading nonprofit human service providers, conducted an exploratory study of two-generation programs already in place within its member organizations. The Annie E. Casey Foundation (AECF) supported this effort, which sought to document quality two-generation programs and identify program elements that strengthen young families. The study eventually engaged 32 NHSA members and affiliates in sharing their knowledge about two-generation approaches and providing connections to programs that re-engage young parents in education and/or work, nurture parent-child bonds, improve children’s wellbeing, and connect families with economic, social, and other supports. This report features case studies of two-generation programs, describes elements associated with successful outcomes, and recommends future work. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Lee, Helly; Walker, Christina; Golden, Olivia
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2015

    On April 23-24, 2015, through the support of the Annie E. Casey Foundation, CLASP hosted a roundtable on Two-Generational Strategies to Improve Immigrant Family and Child Outcomes in Washington, D.C. The roundtable brought together 39 leading experts from early education, workforce development, postsecondary education, and immigration policy and practice fields to discuss two-generational strategies to support immigrant families and children. The roundtable and the brief highlighting the discussions from this event come a critical time, when immigrants and their children are a growing and significant part of the changing demographics of the U.S. and as time-sensitive opportunities around workforce development, early education and child care and immigration are at the forefront of policy making. (author abstract)

    On April 23-24, 2015, through the support of the Annie E. Casey Foundation, CLASP hosted a roundtable on Two-Generational Strategies to Improve Immigrant Family and Child Outcomes in Washington, D.C. The roundtable brought together 39 leading experts from early education, workforce development, postsecondary education, and immigration policy and practice fields to discuss two-generational strategies to support immigrant families and children. The roundtable and the brief highlighting the discussions from this event come a critical time, when immigrants and their children are a growing and significant part of the changing demographics of the U.S. and as time-sensitive opportunities around workforce development, early education and child care and immigration are at the forefront of policy making. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Lombardi, Joan; Mosle, Anne; Patel, Nisha; Schumacher, Rachel; Stedron, Jennifer
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2014

    Americans have always relied on a set of core beliefs that fall under the umbrella of "The American Dream." Hard work. Equal opportunity. Optimism. However, many feel these values are in jeopardy; many parents have a growing unease about the future-- their own futures and they children's futures. Major shifts in family demographics and structure, as well as in the skills and education required by the economy, mandate a change in how we help families succeed Two-generation approaches, which focus on creating opportunities for and meeting the needs of vulnerable children and their parents together, move the whole family toward educational success and economic security. Ascend is the national hub for two-generation approaches. In Gateways to Two Generations, Ascend considers the question: Will two-generation approaches applied to the early childhood development arena produce better outcomes for both children and parents? (author abstract)

    Americans have always relied on a set of core beliefs that fall under the umbrella of "The American Dream." Hard work. Equal opportunity. Optimism. However, many feel these values are in jeopardy; many parents have a growing unease about the future-- their own futures and they children's futures. Major shifts in family demographics and structure, as well as in the skills and education required by the economy, mandate a change in how we help families succeed Two-generation approaches, which focus on creating opportunities for and meeting the needs of vulnerable children and their parents together, move the whole family toward educational success and economic security. Ascend is the national hub for two-generation approaches. In Gateways to Two Generations, Ascend considers the question: Will two-generation approaches applied to the early childhood development arena produce better outcomes for both children and parents? (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Bassett, Meegan Dugan
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2014

    Over the last few years, a new interest has emerged in two-generation (2 Gen) anti-poverty strategies. Federal and state policymakers, philanthropies, direct service nonprofits, and others have begun looking at better ways to provide low-income parents and children with resources to break the cycle of intergenerational poverty and improve economic mobility.

    Definitions of 2 Gen strategies include those that generally support family income growth and those that focus on providing children with excellent early childhood education and parents with tools to support children’s educational success. However, many 2 Gen policies and programs now start with the premise that what low-income families most need is access to quality education, good jobs with benefits, and a full array of family services and supports…

    As 2 Gen efforts gain more attention nationally, states are being recognized for their potential to stimulate new policies to better serve low-income families and address the long-standing challenges of intergenerational poverty and economic mobility…

    This...

    Over the last few years, a new interest has emerged in two-generation (2 Gen) anti-poverty strategies. Federal and state policymakers, philanthropies, direct service nonprofits, and others have begun looking at better ways to provide low-income parents and children with resources to break the cycle of intergenerational poverty and improve economic mobility.

    Definitions of 2 Gen strategies include those that generally support family income growth and those that focus on providing children with excellent early childhood education and parents with tools to support children’s educational success. However, many 2 Gen policies and programs now start with the premise that what low-income families most need is access to quality education, good jobs with benefits, and a full array of family services and supports…

    As 2 Gen efforts gain more attention nationally, states are being recognized for their potential to stimulate new policies to better serve low-income families and address the long-standing challenges of intergenerational poverty and economic mobility…

    This WPFP policy brief examines opportunities for states to play a prominent role in the evolving 2 Gen movement. The first section reviews the continuing need to address poverty in America, the history of 2 Gen strategies in America, the evidence suggesting the promise of 2 Gen efforts, and current efforts to bring renewed attention to 2 Gen work. It also elaborates on the WPFP’s approach to 2 Gen state policy work. The second section examines the role of states in pursuing 2 Gen strategies, with a particular focus on the state systems and policies that help adults to achieve economic success and maintain strong, stable families. The final section of this brief offers recommendations to support and stimulate state 2 Gen efforts. (author introduction)

  • Individual Author: King, Christopher; Chase-Lansdale, Lindsay; Small, Mario
    Reference Type: Book Chapter/Book
    Year: 2015

    Two Generations. One Future: An Anthology from the Ascend Fellowship, edited by Dr. Christopher King; Dr. P. Lindsay Chase-Lansdale; and Dr. Mario Small, offers insights into 2-Gen 2.0 approaches spearheaded by 20 leaders from across sectors, including the fields of human services, mental health, justice-involved families, and early childhood. It is divided into three sections: 1) Underpinnings of two-generation strategies; 2) Address and empowering families; 3) Innovative policies and programs; and 4) Evaluating and fostering two-generation strategies.(author introduction)

    Table of Contents:

    INTRODUCTION AND OVERVIEW

    Introduction, Elliot Gerson and Anne Mosle

    2-Gen 2.0: An Overview, Editors Christopher T. King, P. Lindsay Chase-Lansdale, and Mario Small

    Contributor Biographies

    Aspen Institute Ascend Fellows

    1. UNDERPINNINGS OF TWO-GENERATION STRATEGIES

    Gateways to Two Generations: The Potential for Early Childhood Programs and Partnerships to Support Children and...

    Two Generations. One Future: An Anthology from the Ascend Fellowship, edited by Dr. Christopher King; Dr. P. Lindsay Chase-Lansdale; and Dr. Mario Small, offers insights into 2-Gen 2.0 approaches spearheaded by 20 leaders from across sectors, including the fields of human services, mental health, justice-involved families, and early childhood. It is divided into three sections: 1) Underpinnings of two-generation strategies; 2) Address and empowering families; 3) Innovative policies and programs; and 4) Evaluating and fostering two-generation strategies.(author introduction)

    Table of Contents:

    INTRODUCTION AND OVERVIEW

    Introduction, Elliot Gerson and Anne Mosle

    2-Gen 2.0: An Overview, Editors Christopher T. King, P. Lindsay Chase-Lansdale, and Mario Small

    Contributor Biographies

    Aspen Institute Ascend Fellows

    1. UNDERPINNINGS OF TWO-GENERATION STRATEGIES

    Gateways to Two Generations: The Potential for Early Childhood Programs and Partnerships to Support Children and Parents Together, Joan Lombardi, Anne Mosle, Nisha Patel, Rachel Schumacher, and Jennifer Stedron

    Two-Generation Programs in the 21st Century, P. Lindsay Chase-Lansdale and Jeanne Brooks-Gunn

    Reflections, Wes Moore

    2. ADDRESS AND EMPOWERING FAMILIES

    Seeking Stable Futures: Parent Voices, Sarah Haight

    The Ties that Bind: How Child Care Centers Build Social Capital, Mario Small

    Moving Up Together: Lessons from the Family Interdependence Initiative, Mia Birdsong

    The Role of Asset Building in Generational Success, Andrea Levere, Kate Griffn, Emily Hoagland, Ezra Levin and Leigh Tivol

    Serving Justice-Involved Moms in a Two-Generation Program, Vivian D. Nixon

    The Case for Prevention: A Two-Generation Approach to Ending Child Abuse, Katie Albright, Genanne Walsh, Larry Yip, and Malcolm Gaines

    American MoJo: Building a For-Profit Social Enterprise that Truly Drives Impact, Cara Aley

    Out of Sync? Engaging Youth in Poverty Alleviation, Steve Liss

    3. INNOVATIVE POLICIES AND PROGRAMS

    Closing the School Readiness Gap through Two Generations, Henry Wilde

    Promoting Education: The Two-Generation Approach of the Community Action Project of Tulsa, OK, Teresa Eckrich Sommer, Terri Sabol, Tara Smith, Steven Dow, Monica Barczak, P. Lindsay Chase-Lansdale, Jeanne Brooks-Gunn, Hirokazu Yoshikawa, and Christopher T. King

    Building a Legacy of Family Success at Miami Dade College, Eduardo J. Padrón

    Jeremiah Program: Transforming Lives Two Generations at a Time, Gloria Perez

    Keys to Degrees: Educating Two Generations Together — an Innovative Postsecondary Program Supporting Two-Generation Mobility, Autumn Green and Richard Wylie

    Creating Bold Human Services for the 21st Century, Reggie Bicha

    4. EVALUATING AND FOSTERING TWO-GENERATION STRATEGIES

    Measuring the Results of Two-Generation Anti-Poverty Strategies, Christopher T. King and Donald J. Hernandez

    Connecting, Aligning, and Producing Intergenerational Success: The Ascend Network, Mekaelia Davis, Nisha Patel, and Anne Mosle

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