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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: Kirby, Gretchen; Anderson, Jacquelyn
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2000

    The Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation (PRWORA) Act of 1996 places a premium on cash-assistance recipients’ efforts to work and holds recipients and state programs accountable for increasing self-sufficiency. The work requirements and time limits under the Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF) system provide little room for work exemptions and create an incentive to explore the needs of “harder-to-serve” populations—including those with substance abuse problems—so that they, too, may move into work and be assisted on a path toward self-sufficiency. TANF program administrators who hope to meet future work-participation requirements and prevent significant time-limit exemptions may want to start making policy and programmatic choices now to better prepare this population for work in the long run.

    This guide provides TANF program administrators and staff with information to help devise a strategy for identifying and addressing the needs of recipients with substance abuse problems. The guide has four sections:

    • Section I:...

    The Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation (PRWORA) Act of 1996 places a premium on cash-assistance recipients’ efforts to work and holds recipients and state programs accountable for increasing self-sufficiency. The work requirements and time limits under the Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF) system provide little room for work exemptions and create an incentive to explore the needs of “harder-to-serve” populations—including those with substance abuse problems—so that they, too, may move into work and be assisted on a path toward self-sufficiency. TANF program administrators who hope to meet future work-participation requirements and prevent significant time-limit exemptions may want to start making policy and programmatic choices now to better prepare this population for work in the long run.

    This guide provides TANF program administrators and staff with information to help devise a strategy for identifying and addressing the needs of recipients with substance abuse problems. The guide has four sections:

    • Section I: Understanding the Substance-Abuse Problem. Discusses the prevalence of substance abuse among welfare recipients and the benefits of addressing these problems in the context of the welfare program.
    • Section II: Identifying Welfare Recipients with Substance-Abuse Problems. Presents a series of decision points for developing a process to identify TANF recipients with substance-abuse problems.
    • Section III: Treating Substance Abuse. Provides background information on treatment-related issues such as treatment options, outcomes, expectations and service delivery as well as the resources available for treatment.
    • Section IV: Integrating Treatment into a Work-Focused Welfare Program. Outlines the policy and programmatic decisions for integrating an approach to treatment into the welfare program and discusses the points to consider when coordinating welfare and treatment services.

    Additional organizations and resources that can provide greater detail on the concepts and decisions outlined in this report are described throughout the text and in the resource section in Appendix A. (author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Joyce, Kristen; Radel, Laura; Wulff, Carli
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2011

    In the years since welfare reform transformed federal cash  assistance for the poor into the time-limited, work-focused Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) Program, the issue of substance abuse among welfare recipients has arisen periodically as a policy and programmatic concern.1 In recent years there have been vigorous policy debates focused on welfare policy with respect to persons with drug felony convictions as well as proposals to require drug tests as a condition of eligibility.

    This paper discusses the prevalence of substance abuse among TANF recipients, how States typically address substance abuse in their welfare programs, the variety of drug testing proposals now under discussion in States, and legal and practical issues raised by drug testing proposals. (author abstract)

    In the years since welfare reform transformed federal cash  assistance for the poor into the time-limited, work-focused Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) Program, the issue of substance abuse among welfare recipients has arisen periodically as a policy and programmatic concern.1 In recent years there have been vigorous policy debates focused on welfare policy with respect to persons with drug felony convictions as well as proposals to require drug tests as a condition of eligibility.

    This paper discusses the prevalence of substance abuse among TANF recipients, how States typically address substance abuse in their welfare programs, the variety of drug testing proposals now under discussion in States, and legal and practical issues raised by drug testing proposals. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Metsch, Lisa R. ; Pereyra, Margaret; Miles, Christine C. ; McCoy, Clyde B.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2003

    Employment and welfare outcomes are investigated for women who received both welfare and substance abuse treatment in Florida from 1994 to 1999. By linking information from three statewide administrative databases, we identify 4,236 women who meet both criteria. Over the study period, there was a significant increase in the proportion of women moving from welfare to work. Predictors of posttreatment employment include demographic characteristics, treatment-related characteristics, and working during the month of admission. Both completion of treatment and length of time in treatment are associated with employment. (author abstract)

    Employment and welfare outcomes are investigated for women who received both welfare and substance abuse treatment in Florida from 1994 to 1999. By linking information from three statewide administrative databases, we identify 4,236 women who meet both criteria. Over the study period, there was a significant increase in the proportion of women moving from welfare to work. Predictors of posttreatment employment include demographic characteristics, treatment-related characteristics, and working during the month of admission. Both completion of treatment and length of time in treatment are associated with employment. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: James Bell Associates
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2003

    The evaluation of AFF, required by ARS 8-881, focuses on the implementation of the AFF community substance abuse prevention and treatment programs at all nine sites, the factors that contribute to their success, and the extent to which the legislature’s outcome goals of increases in timeliness, availability and accessibility of services; recovery from alcohol and drug problems; child safety; permanency for children through reunification; and the achievement of self-sufficiency through employment can be obtained. The focus during the first year of the evaluation was on establishing a cross-agency, client-level data base system, documenting the implementation of AFF through quarterly data collection at each of the AFF sites, and analyzing data on clients’ utilization of services. During the second year of the evaluation, the focus was on continuing to document program implementation through the analysis and reporting of client-level service utilization data and qualitative data gathered from program directors, RBHA representatives, and clients. Analyses also were conducted using...

    The evaluation of AFF, required by ARS 8-881, focuses on the implementation of the AFF community substance abuse prevention and treatment programs at all nine sites, the factors that contribute to their success, and the extent to which the legislature’s outcome goals of increases in timeliness, availability and accessibility of services; recovery from alcohol and drug problems; child safety; permanency for children through reunification; and the achievement of self-sufficiency through employment can be obtained. The focus during the first year of the evaluation was on establishing a cross-agency, client-level data base system, documenting the implementation of AFF through quarterly data collection at each of the AFF sites, and analyzing data on clients’ utilization of services. During the second year of the evaluation, the focus was on continuing to document program implementation through the analysis and reporting of client-level service utilization data and qualitative data gathered from program directors, RBHA representatives, and clients. Analyses also were conducted using the data available to determine early findings with respect to child welfare and employment outcomes as of March 31, 2003. (author abstract)

     

  • Individual Author: Pollack, Harold A.; Danzinger, Sheldon; Jayakody, Rukmalie; Seefeldt, Kristin S.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2002

    Illicit drug use by welfare recipients has been identified as an important barrier to well-being and social performance. This paper uses nationally representative cross-sectional data, and Michigan-specific panel data, to summarize trends in substance use among AFDC/TANF recipients. It also examines the prevalence of drug use disorders within the welfare population. Although almost 20 percent of welfare recipients report recent use of some illicit substance, our analysis indicates that only a small minority of welfare recipients satisfy screening criteria for chemical dependence. The paper concludes by considering policy responses to substance use disorders following welfare reform. (author abstract)

    Illicit drug use by welfare recipients has been identified as an important barrier to well-being and social performance. This paper uses nationally representative cross-sectional data, and Michigan-specific panel data, to summarize trends in substance use among AFDC/TANF recipients. It also examines the prevalence of drug use disorders within the welfare population. Although almost 20 percent of welfare recipients report recent use of some illicit substance, our analysis indicates that only a small minority of welfare recipients satisfy screening criteria for chemical dependence. The paper concludes by considering policy responses to substance use disorders following welfare reform. (author abstract)

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