Skip to main content
Back to Top

SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

  • Conduct a search and filter parameters as desired.
  • "Check" the box next to the resources for which you would like a citation.
  • Select "Download Selected Citation" at the top of the Library Search Page.
  • Select your export style:
    • Text File.
    • RIS Format.
    • APA format.
  • Select submit and download your citations.

The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Evans, Gary; Schamberg, Michelle
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2009

    The income–achievement gap is a formidable societal problem, but little is known about either neurocognitive or biological mechanisms that might account for income-related deficits in academic achievement. We show that childhood poverty is inversely related to working memory in young adults. Furthermore, this prospective relationship is mediated by elevated chronic stress during childhood. Chronic stress is measured by allostatic load, a biological marker of cumulative wear and tear on the body that is caused by the mobilization of multiple physiological systems in response to chronic environmental demands. (author abstract)

    The income–achievement gap is a formidable societal problem, but little is known about either neurocognitive or biological mechanisms that might account for income-related deficits in academic achievement. We show that childhood poverty is inversely related to working memory in young adults. Furthermore, this prospective relationship is mediated by elevated chronic stress during childhood. Chronic stress is measured by allostatic load, a biological marker of cumulative wear and tear on the body that is caused by the mobilization of multiple physiological systems in response to chronic environmental demands. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Evans, Gary W.; Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne; Klebanov, Pamela Kato
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2011

    This article explores the link between childhood poverty and the negative effects of prolonged exposure to stressful environments. (publisher abstract)

    This article was also published by the Stanford Center on Poverty and Inequality.

    This article explores the link between childhood poverty and the negative effects of prolonged exposure to stressful environments. (publisher abstract)

    This article was also published by the Stanford Center on Poverty and Inequality.

  • Individual Author: Anda, Robert F.; Fleisher, Vladimir I.; Felitti, Vincent J.; Edwards, Valerie J.; Whitfield, Charles L.; Dube, Shanta R.; Williamson, David F.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2004

    Objective: We examined the relation between eight types of adverse childhood experience (ACE) and three indicators of impaired worker performance (serious job problems, financial problems, and absenteeism).

    Methods: We analyzed data collected for the Adverse Childhood Experiences Study from 9633 currently employed adult members of the Kaiser Foundation Health Plan in San Diego.

    Results: Strong graded relations were found between the ACE Score (total number of ACE categories experienced) and each measure of impaired worker performance (p <.001). We found strong evidence that the relation between ACE Score and worker performance was mediated by interpersonal relationship problems, emotional distress, somatic symptoms, and substance abuse.

    Conclusions: The long-term effects of adverse childhood experiences on the workforce impose major human and economic costs that are preventable. These costs merit attention from the business community in conjunction with specialists in occupational medicine and public health (author abstract)

    Objective: We examined the relation between eight types of adverse childhood experience (ACE) and three indicators of impaired worker performance (serious job problems, financial problems, and absenteeism).

    Methods: We analyzed data collected for the Adverse Childhood Experiences Study from 9633 currently employed adult members of the Kaiser Foundation Health Plan in San Diego.

    Results: Strong graded relations were found between the ACE Score (total number of ACE categories experienced) and each measure of impaired worker performance (p <.001). We found strong evidence that the relation between ACE Score and worker performance was mediated by interpersonal relationship problems, emotional distress, somatic symptoms, and substance abuse.

    Conclusions: The long-term effects of adverse childhood experiences on the workforce impose major human and economic costs that are preventable. These costs merit attention from the business community in conjunction with specialists in occupational medicine and public health (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Williams-Shanks, Trina R.; Robinson, Christine
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2013

    A large body of evidence indicates that socioeconomic status (SES) is a strong predictor of school achievement, college graduation and child outcomes in general. Better developmental and health outcomes are strongly associated with family assets, income and education. We introduce a model incorporating a range of theoretical and empirical literature about the relationships between a household's socio-economic position, household interactions, and child educational outcomes. The intention is to illustrate how these frequently cited factors are exacerbated and aligned by stress or difficult environments which cause long-term challenges for children in high-risk circumstances. Finally, we modify the model to illustrate the dynamic nature of these relationships, highlighting how the developmental trajectory of a child who lives with toxic stress might differ from a comparable child with social supports in a situation of low or tolerable stress. (author abstract)

    A large body of evidence indicates that socioeconomic status (SES) is a strong predictor of school achievement, college graduation and child outcomes in general. Better developmental and health outcomes are strongly associated with family assets, income and education. We introduce a model incorporating a range of theoretical and empirical literature about the relationships between a household's socio-economic position, household interactions, and child educational outcomes. The intention is to illustrate how these frequently cited factors are exacerbated and aligned by stress or difficult environments which cause long-term challenges for children in high-risk circumstances. Finally, we modify the model to illustrate the dynamic nature of these relationships, highlighting how the developmental trajectory of a child who lives with toxic stress might differ from a comparable child with social supports in a situation of low or tolerable stress. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Tomer, John F.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2013

    "The most valuable of all capital is that invested in human beings; and of that capital the most precious part is the result of the care and influence of the mother" Alfred Marshall 1890.

    Despite Marshall's early recognition of the importance of mothering, modern day human capital theory scarcely reflects the role of parents and the home environment as factors influencing the production of human capital. The purpose of this paper is to look more deeply into the earliest phase of child development, from birth to two or three years of age, in order to understand the implications of this development for human capital theory. Recently, important noneconomic research has revealed the growing prevalence of adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) among young children and the role this plays in impairing their brain functioning and contributing to later age physical and mental ailments. Accordingly, this paper explores the role of ACEs for understanding the growth of poverty and inequality of both income and academic achievement. This paper attempts to build on James Heckman’s...

    "The most valuable of all capital is that invested in human beings; and of that capital the most precious part is the result of the care and influence of the mother" Alfred Marshall 1890.

    Despite Marshall's early recognition of the importance of mothering, modern day human capital theory scarcely reflects the role of parents and the home environment as factors influencing the production of human capital. The purpose of this paper is to look more deeply into the earliest phase of child development, from birth to two or three years of age, in order to understand the implications of this development for human capital theory. Recently, important noneconomic research has revealed the growing prevalence of adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) among young children and the role this plays in impairing their brain functioning and contributing to later age physical and mental ailments. Accordingly, this paper explores the role of ACEs for understanding the growth of poverty and inequality of both income and academic achievement. This paper attempts to build on James Heckman’s important contributions related to human capital formation in early childhood.

    In contrast to other economic and socio-economic theories explaining the growth of inequality of academic achievement (and income), this paper focuses on the magnitude and growth of ACEs and poor parenting within the lower socio-economic class. Other theories no doubt have some validity, but if they leave out ACEs, they are missing a crucial causal factor. The implications of this theory for remedies to ACEs and related early childhood stressors are explored. These remedies involve different ways to build human capital during the early childhood years so that children will ultimately arrive at school (and later workplaces) with their brains unimpaired. Doing the caring work of making these human capital investments works better if these efforts are part of what ordinarily happens in a caring economy and part of a sensible human capital strategy. (Author abstract)

Sort by

Topical Area(s)

Popular Searches

Source

Year

Year ranges from 1998 to 2018

Reference Type

Research Methodology

Geographic Focus

Target Populations