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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Kearney, Melissa S.; Harris, Benjamin H.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2013

    An extension of federal unemployment insurance (UI) was omitted from the budget deal recently worked out between Congressional leaders. With both the House and Senate now adjourned for the holidays, 1.3 million Americans will immediately lose their UI benefits on December 28th, with an additional 3.6 million jobless workers losing benefits over the next 12 months.

    The extended UI benefits, which were originally enacted during the Great Recession, were designed to provide the long-term unemployed with additional benefits if they are unable to find a job. Unemployment insurance continues to play a crucial role for many American families; in 2013, the average job finding rate was still 30 percent lower than the average from 1990-2007, prior to the Great Recession. Further, today there are still nearly three unemployed workers per job opening—roughly twice the competition faced before the recession.

    The issue of whether to extend unemployment benefits will re-emerge in early 2014. Advocates of an extension of UI benefits point out that these benefits accrue to...

    An extension of federal unemployment insurance (UI) was omitted from the budget deal recently worked out between Congressional leaders. With both the House and Senate now adjourned for the holidays, 1.3 million Americans will immediately lose their UI benefits on December 28th, with an additional 3.6 million jobless workers losing benefits over the next 12 months.

    The extended UI benefits, which were originally enacted during the Great Recession, were designed to provide the long-term unemployed with additional benefits if they are unable to find a job. Unemployment insurance continues to play a crucial role for many American families; in 2013, the average job finding rate was still 30 percent lower than the average from 1990-2007, prior to the Great Recession. Further, today there are still nearly three unemployed workers per job opening—roughly twice the competition faced before the recession.

    The issue of whether to extend unemployment benefits will re-emerge in early 2014. Advocates of an extension of UI benefits point out that these benefits accrue to unemployed workers and their families. The benefits help these individuals put food on the table and pay the rent at a time of extraordinary economic weakness. In doing so, these benefits serve in part to boost the economy as a whole as UI recipients maintain consumption. Skeptics of an extension point to both the monetary costs to government, but also to the potential costs of “enabling” UI recipients to spend less time and effort searching for work.

    In this month’s employment analysis, The Hamilton Project reexamines unemployment insurance. Our analysis highlights evidence suggesting that extended benefits provide a sizable boost for workers and the economy, but have little negative effect on unemployment duration—especially when the labor market is weak. (author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Vroman, Wayne
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 1998

    One goal of welfare reform is to move larger numbers of welfare recipients into work. If the aims of the 1996 federal welfare reform legislation are achieved, by 1998 more than a quarter of the roughly 4 million adults who received Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) will be active labor market participants, and half are slated to join the workforce by 2002. Many, if not most, will no longer be receiving welfare benefits at that time.

    Low education and lack of work skills and experience put current and former welfare recipients at special risk of unemployment. The national unemployment rate for persons 16 and older in the labor force averaged only 4.9 percent in 1997, but former welfare recipients can be expected to have jobless rates that are twice the national average.

    Nonetheless, the anticipated increase in the unemployment pool resulting from welfare reform is modest. Because of low earnings and other factors, only a small fraction of adult welfare recipients who enter the labor market will become eligible for unemployment insurance (UI) benefits...

    One goal of welfare reform is to move larger numbers of welfare recipients into work. If the aims of the 1996 federal welfare reform legislation are achieved, by 1998 more than a quarter of the roughly 4 million adults who received Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) will be active labor market participants, and half are slated to join the workforce by 2002. Many, if not most, will no longer be receiving welfare benefits at that time.

    Low education and lack of work skills and experience put current and former welfare recipients at special risk of unemployment. The national unemployment rate for persons 16 and older in the labor force averaged only 4.9 percent in 1997, but former welfare recipients can be expected to have jobless rates that are twice the national average.

    Nonetheless, the anticipated increase in the unemployment pool resulting from welfare reform is modest. Because of low earnings and other factors, only a small fraction of adult welfare recipients who enter the labor market will become eligible for unemployment insurance (UI) benefits under current rules. Moreover, neither federal nor state laws governing eligibility are likely to change in ways that will enhance access to unemployment benefits for unemployed former welfare recipients. Thus, these new workers’ impact on the UI system, in terms of added beneficiaries and costs, will be hardly noticeable. (author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Lovell, Vicky; Emsellem, Maurice
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2004

    The Florida unemployment insurance (UI) system is not meeting its basic goal of providing a modest measure of income support to temporarily unemployed workers. This is due in significant part to the UI system’s failure to keep pace with fundamental changes in the labor market, including the growth of low-wage and part-time work and the vastly expanding role of women in the labor market. This situation exists despite the significant reserves in Florida’s UI trust fund, even during the current economic downturn, and record-level UI tax cuts. (author abstract)

    The Florida unemployment insurance (UI) system is not meeting its basic goal of providing a modest measure of income support to temporarily unemployed workers. This is due in significant part to the UI system’s failure to keep pace with fundamental changes in the labor market, including the growth of low-wage and part-time work and the vastly expanding role of women in the labor market. This situation exists despite the significant reserves in Florida’s UI trust fund, even during the current economic downturn, and record-level UI tax cuts. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Rothstein, Jesse; Valleta, Robert G.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2014

    Despite unprecedented extensions of available unemployment insurance (UI) benefits during the "Great Recession" of 2007-09 and its aftermath, large numbers of recipients exhausted their maximum available UI benefits prior to finding new jobs. Using SIPP panel data and an event-study regression framework, we examine the household income patterns of individuals whose jobless spells outlast their UI benefits, comparing the periods following the 2001 and 2007-09 recessions. Job loss reduces household income roughly by half on average, and for UI recipients benefits replace just under half of this loss. Accordingly, when benefits end the household loses UI income equal to roughly one-quarter of total pre-separation household income (and about one-third of pre-exhaustion household income). Only a small portion of this loss is offset by increased income from food stamps and other safety net programs. The share of families with income below the poverty line nearly doubles. These patterns were generally similar following the 2001 and 2007-09 recessions and do not vary dramatically by...

    Despite unprecedented extensions of available unemployment insurance (UI) benefits during the "Great Recession" of 2007-09 and its aftermath, large numbers of recipients exhausted their maximum available UI benefits prior to finding new jobs. Using SIPP panel data and an event-study regression framework, we examine the household income patterns of individuals whose jobless spells outlast their UI benefits, comparing the periods following the 2001 and 2007-09 recessions. Job loss reduces household income roughly by half on average, and for UI recipients benefits replace just under half of this loss. Accordingly, when benefits end the household loses UI income equal to roughly one-quarter of total pre-separation household income (and about one-third of pre-exhaustion household income). Only a small portion of this loss is offset by increased income from food stamps and other safety net programs. The share of families with income below the poverty line nearly doubles. These patterns were generally similar following the 2001 and 2007-09 recessions and do not vary dramatically by household age or income prior to job loss. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Stone, Chad; Chen, William
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2014

    The federal-state unemployment insurance system (UI) helps many people who have lost their jobs by temporarily replacing part of their wages while they look for work. Created in 1935, it is a form of social insurance in which taxes collected from employers are paid into the system on behalf of working people to provide them with income support if they lose their jobs. The system also helps sustain consumer demand during economic downturns by providing a continuing stream of dollars for families to spend. (author introduction)

    The federal-state unemployment insurance system (UI) helps many people who have lost their jobs by temporarily replacing part of their wages while they look for work. Created in 1935, it is a form of social insurance in which taxes collected from employers are paid into the system on behalf of working people to provide them with income support if they lose their jobs. The system also helps sustain consumer demand during economic downturns by providing a continuing stream of dollars for families to spend. (author introduction)

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