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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: O'Leary, Christopher J.; Kline, Kenneth J.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2008

    The Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act (PRWORA) established Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) in 1996 as the main federally funded program for cash assistance to needy families. Since that time, the number of benefit recipients has declined dramatically. While many TANF recipients left for employment, a substantial proportion experienced subsequent joblessness within the first few years following their exits. Using program administrative data, this study examines the role of regular unemployment insurance (UI) benefits in maintaining self-sufficiency for TANF leavers who experience subsequent job loss.

    To receive UI, both monetary and non-monetary requirements must be met. Eligibility for UI benefits requires that claimants have adequate recent employment and earnings, and involuntary job separations not due to things like poor job performance or misconduct. Furthermore, UI beneficiaries must be able, available, and actively seeking full-time work.

    Among TANF recipients who left the program for employment, this study...

    The Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act (PRWORA) established Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) in 1996 as the main federally funded program for cash assistance to needy families. Since that time, the number of benefit recipients has declined dramatically. While many TANF recipients left for employment, a substantial proportion experienced subsequent joblessness within the first few years following their exits. Using program administrative data, this study examines the role of regular unemployment insurance (UI) benefits in maintaining self-sufficiency for TANF leavers who experience subsequent job loss.

    To receive UI, both monetary and non-monetary requirements must be met. Eligibility for UI benefits requires that claimants have adequate recent employment and earnings, and involuntary job separations not due to things like poor job performance or misconduct. Furthermore, UI beneficiaries must be able, available, and actively seeking full-time work.

    Among TANF recipients who left the program for employment, this study examines subsequent joblessness, application for UI benefits, eligibility for UI benefits, and rates of UI benefit receipt. The levels of TANF and UI income support are compared, and the rate of return to TANF is contrasted between UI beneficiaries, non-applicants, and ineligible applicants. Findings are compared to results from earlier studies measuring UI eligibility and receipt among those who left social assistance programs. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: O'Leary, Christopher J.; Kline, Kenneth J.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2014

    During the Great Recession, both the Supplementary Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) and the federal-state unemployment insurance (UI) program experienced dramatic increases in participation. Using Michigan program administrative data on all SNAP (2006–2011) recipients and all UI (2001–2010) applicants, we examine SNAP use before and after UI application. Both past and future receipts of SNAP are highly negatively correlated with meeting UI income and job separation eligibility requirements. Unemployment insurance applicants with insufficient wage credits or job separations because of quitting or employer discharge are much more likely to have received SNAP in the past. Furthermore, such UI applicants are also more likely to receive SNAP soon after applying for UI benefits. The data also indicate that as of the start of the Great Recession, UI applicants who received SNAP subsequent to UI filing began receiving those benefits sooner compared with UI applicants prior to the downturn. The models also suggest that SNAP receipt after UI application was higher among ineligible UI...

    During the Great Recession, both the Supplementary Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) and the federal-state unemployment insurance (UI) program experienced dramatic increases in participation. Using Michigan program administrative data on all SNAP (2006–2011) recipients and all UI (2001–2010) applicants, we examine SNAP use before and after UI application. Both past and future receipts of SNAP are highly negatively correlated with meeting UI income and job separation eligibility requirements. Unemployment insurance applicants with insufficient wage credits or job separations because of quitting or employer discharge are much more likely to have received SNAP in the past. Furthermore, such UI applicants are also more likely to receive SNAP soon after applying for UI benefits. The data also indicate that as of the start of the Great Recession, UI applicants who received SNAP subsequent to UI filing began receiving those benefits sooner compared with UI applicants prior to the downturn. The models also suggest that SNAP receipt after UI application was higher among ineligible UI applicants, applicants who quit or were fired from prior jobs, those with prior recent SNAP receipt, prime age workers, females, those with education of less than a high school diploma, those having three to five years’ prior job tenure, and those with a separating job in retail trade, health care, or hospitality. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: O'Leary, Christopher J. ; Kline, Kenneth J.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2014

    During the Great Recession, both the Supplementary Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) and the federal-state unemployment insurance (UI) program experienced dramatic increases in participation. Using Michigan program administrative data on all SNAP (2006–2011) recipients and all UI (2001–2010) applicants, we examine SNAP use before and after UI application. Both past and future receipts of SNAP are highly negatively correlated with meeting UI income and job separation eligibility requirements. Unemployment insurance applicants with insufficient wage credits or job separations because of quitting or employer discharge are much more likely to have received SNAP in the past. Furthermore, such UI applicants are also more likely to receive SNAP soon after applying for UI benefits. The data also indicate that as of the start of the Great Recession, UI applicants who received SNAP subsequent to UI filing began receiving those benefits sooner compared with UI applicants prior to the downturn. The models also suggest that SNAP receipt after UI application was higher among ineligible UI...

    During the Great Recession, both the Supplementary Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) and the federal-state unemployment insurance (UI) program experienced dramatic increases in participation. Using Michigan program administrative data on all SNAP (2006–2011) recipients and all UI (2001–2010) applicants, we examine SNAP use before and after UI application. Both past and future receipts of SNAP are highly negatively correlated with meeting UI income and job separation eligibility requirements. Unemployment insurance applicants with insufficient wage credits or job separations because of quitting or employer discharge are much more likely to have received SNAP in the past. Furthermore, such UI applicants are also more likely to receive SNAP soon after applying for UI benefits. The data also indicate that as of the start of the Great Recession, UI applicants who received SNAP subsequent to UI filing began receiving those benefits sooner compared with UI applicants prior to the downturn. The models also suggest that SNAP receipt after UI application was higher among ineligible UI applicants, applicants who quit or were fired from prior jobs, those with prior recent SNAP receipt, prime age workers, females, those with education of less than a high school diploma, those having three to five years’ prior job tenure, and those with a separating job in retail trade, health care, or hospitality. (Author abstract)

     

  • Individual Author: Darling, Matthew; O'Leary, Christopher ; Perez-Johnson, Irma; Lefkowitz, Jaclyn; Kline, Ken; Damerow, Ben; Eberts, Randall; Amin, Samia ; Chojnacki, Greg
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    This report presents findings from Mathematica’s behavioral insights study conducted for the U.S. Department of Labor’s Reemployment and Eligibility Assessment (REA) program in Michigan. This report presents our findings on the effects of emails designed to encourage UI claimants to (1) schedule and attend REA sessions with Michigan Works! Southwest and (2) persist in efforts that will help them succeed in their job search efforts following REA program completion. Key findings include:

    • Simple encouragement emails resulted in a 15 percentage point increase in Unemployment Insurance (UI) claimants scheduling their first REA session.
    • There was a 14 percentage point increase in the number of UI claimants completing the REA program. (Edited author abstract) 

    This report presents findings from Mathematica’s behavioral insights study conducted for the U.S. Department of Labor’s Reemployment and Eligibility Assessment (REA) program in Michigan. This report presents our findings on the effects of emails designed to encourage UI claimants to (1) schedule and attend REA sessions with Michigan Works! Southwest and (2) persist in efforts that will help them succeed in their job search efforts following REA program completion. Key findings include:

    • Simple encouragement emails resulted in a 15 percentage point increase in Unemployment Insurance (UI) claimants scheduling their first REA session.
    • There was a 14 percentage point increase in the number of UI claimants completing the REA program. (Edited author abstract) 
  • Individual Author: Lefkowitz, Jaclyn; Darling, Matthew; Chojnacki, Gregory ; Perez-Johnson, Irma ; Amin, Samia; Manley, Mikia
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    The U.S. Department of Labor’s (DOL) Behavioral Interventions (DOL-BI) project adds to a growing body of evidence indicating that relatively small changes in how programs operate can lead to striking improvements in their performance. In three trials that tested applications of behavioral science, the project team found substantial benefits for three DOL programs. We have published detailed technical reports on the design and findings of each trial. This brief focuses on the lessons learned by the team as it identified opportunities for behavioral trials and implemented each one. The three trials differed from one another in terms of scope and program focus, demonstrating the broad applicability of behavioral interventions. And although the trials were implemented in labor programs, the findings have potential implications for the use of behavioral interventions in programs funded by other agencies as well. (Author abstract) 

    The U.S. Department of Labor’s (DOL) Behavioral Interventions (DOL-BI) project adds to a growing body of evidence indicating that relatively small changes in how programs operate can lead to striking improvements in their performance. In three trials that tested applications of behavioral science, the project team found substantial benefits for three DOL programs. We have published detailed technical reports on the design and findings of each trial. This brief focuses on the lessons learned by the team as it identified opportunities for behavioral trials and implemented each one. The three trials differed from one another in terms of scope and program focus, demonstrating the broad applicability of behavioral interventions. And although the trials were implemented in labor programs, the findings have potential implications for the use of behavioral interventions in programs funded by other agencies as well. (Author abstract) 

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