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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Johnson, David E.
    Reference Type: Journal Article, Thesis
    Year: 2011

    The number of welfare recipients in the U.S. peaked at more than 14 million in 1994, adding pressure to reform the system. The welfare reforms of 1996 replaced an open-ended entitlement program with a system of two-and five-year time limits on cash assistance for adults and a fixed budget allocated to states. Since those reforms were enacted, the overall number of welfare recipients and cases in the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program has dropped dramatically, but the number of child-only cases and recipients has fallen much less. Using data from FY1997 through FY2007, I explore factors that help explain why child-only cases respond differently, and examine their state-by-state variability. I fail to reject two hypotheses:  that Net International Migration and a stricter state-by-state welfare policy (including sanctions and time limits) contribute to the increasing share of child-only caseloads; and that the number of unwed births has a disproportionate effect on the child-only caseload. (author abstract)

    The number of welfare recipients in the U.S. peaked at more than 14 million in 1994, adding pressure to reform the system. The welfare reforms of 1996 replaced an open-ended entitlement program with a system of two-and five-year time limits on cash assistance for adults and a fixed budget allocated to states. Since those reforms were enacted, the overall number of welfare recipients and cases in the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program has dropped dramatically, but the number of child-only cases and recipients has fallen much less. Using data from FY1997 through FY2007, I explore factors that help explain why child-only cases respond differently, and examine their state-by-state variability. I fail to reject two hypotheses:  that Net International Migration and a stricter state-by-state welfare policy (including sanctions and time limits) contribute to the increasing share of child-only caseloads; and that the number of unwed births has a disproportionate effect on the child-only caseload. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: O'Dell, Kelley
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2005

    During the past several years, policymakers and program administrators have paid more attention to child-only cases, which comprise a growing percentage of the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) caseload.  While the number of child-only cases dropped between 1996 and 1998 from a peak of 978,000 families (22 percent of the caseload), the number and proportion have since increased. In fiscal 2001 there were about 786,900 child-only cases, accounting for 37.2 percent of the total TANF caseload. In addition, because the children and caregivers in child-only cases have some unique or particularly marked needs, there are questions and concerns about the well-being of these children and how best to serve them and their caregivers.

    To address the circumstances of child-only cases, some states have designed specific programs and policies for them, such as specialized case management and increased financial assistance. Other states are focusing on a holistic service approach and integrating the services of the welfare and child welfare systems. (author abstract)

    ...

    During the past several years, policymakers and program administrators have paid more attention to child-only cases, which comprise a growing percentage of the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) caseload.  While the number of child-only cases dropped between 1996 and 1998 from a peak of 978,000 families (22 percent of the caseload), the number and proportion have since increased. In fiscal 2001 there were about 786,900 child-only cases, accounting for 37.2 percent of the total TANF caseload. In addition, because the children and caregivers in child-only cases have some unique or particularly marked needs, there are questions and concerns about the well-being of these children and how best to serve them and their caregivers.

    To address the circumstances of child-only cases, some states have designed specific programs and policies for them, such as specialized case management and increased financial assistance. Other states are focusing on a holistic service approach and integrating the services of the welfare and child welfare systems. (author abstract)

    The original hyperlink to this resource has been removed by the publisher. You may obtain a single use PDF by emailing the SSRC at ssrc@opressrc.org.

  • Individual Author: Nicoli, Lisa Thiebaud; Passarella, Letitia Logan; Born, Catherine
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2012

    This report provides a profile of the cases that were receiving Temporary Cash Assistance (TCA, Maryland’s TANF program) in October 2011. Additionally, the authors document trends in the caseload throughout the Great Recession and its sluggish recovery. (author abstract)

    This report provides a profile of the cases that were receiving Temporary Cash Assistance (TCA, Maryland’s TANF program) in October 2011. Additionally, the authors document trends in the caseload throughout the Great Recession and its sluggish recovery. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Hall, Lauren; Passarella, Letitia; Born, Catherine
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2012

    Maryland has long used empirical research to assist policymakers and program managers in understanding cash assistance caseloads, and such information is especially useful in the reality of today’s post-recession era. Since welfare reform, more than 15 years ago, Maryland has had ongoing, longitudinal research monitoring welfare reform outcomes. We have one of the largest and most comprehensive state-level research programs that examine welfare outcomes, putting us in a unique position to better serve our families who receive cash assistance. This series, Caseload Exits at the Local Level, has been updated annually since 1996 and reviews case closures at the state and jurisdictional level, examining the number and characteristics of cash assistance cases that close, in addition to the reasons for closure. This series paints a picture for each individual jurisdiction, providing information that is often masked by statewide analyses.

    Today’s report examines the 26,164 unique cases that closed between October 2010 and September 2011. While this study year marks the 15th year...

    Maryland has long used empirical research to assist policymakers and program managers in understanding cash assistance caseloads, and such information is especially useful in the reality of today’s post-recession era. Since welfare reform, more than 15 years ago, Maryland has had ongoing, longitudinal research monitoring welfare reform outcomes. We have one of the largest and most comprehensive state-level research programs that examine welfare outcomes, putting us in a unique position to better serve our families who receive cash assistance. This series, Caseload Exits at the Local Level, has been updated annually since 1996 and reviews case closures at the state and jurisdictional level, examining the number and characteristics of cash assistance cases that close, in addition to the reasons for closure. This series paints a picture for each individual jurisdiction, providing information that is often masked by statewide analyses.

    Today’s report examines the 26,164 unique cases that closed between October 2010 and September 2011. While this study year marks the 15th year since welfare reform in Maryland, it also marks the second full year since the official end to the Great Recession in June 2009. Throughout the recession and the recovery period, this series has documented a steady increase in case closures and work sanctions, yet the current report reveals a potential shift in these trends. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Nicoli, Lisa Thiebaud; Passarella, Letitia; Born, Catherine
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2012

    This brief provides a first look at the Hispanic TCA population in Maryland. We find that the Hispanic TCA population is quite different from the non-Hispanic TCA population in several notable ways: Hispanic payees are younger, more likely to be married, and less likely to have a 12th-grade education. Also, they are more likely to be designated as a child-only case, in which the adult casehead is not calculated in the cash benefit amount. Further research is required to determine whether Hispanic child-only cases resemble the typical child-only case in Maryland. (author abstract)

    This brief provides a first look at the Hispanic TCA population in Maryland. We find that the Hispanic TCA population is quite different from the non-Hispanic TCA population in several notable ways: Hispanic payees are younger, more likely to be married, and less likely to have a 12th-grade education. Also, they are more likely to be designated as a child-only case, in which the adult casehead is not calculated in the cash benefit amount. Further research is required to determine whether Hispanic child-only cases resemble the typical child-only case in Maryland. (author abstract)

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