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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Hoag, Sheila; Swinburn, Adam
    Reference Type:
    Year: 2013

    In September 2010, the Oklahoma Health Care Authority (OHCA) implemented the first realtime online enrollment system for Medicaid and the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP). Oklahoma’s system functions as an online application and uses a sophisticated rules engine that provides an eligibility determination instantly. Almost three-fourths (72 percent) of applicants are eligible to use the online enrollment system to apply for Medicaid and CHIP coverage, known as SoonerCare in Oklahoma. This report summarizes findings from a case study analyzing Oklahoma’s real-time online enrollment system, conducted as part of a larger study evaluating Express Lane Eligibility (ELE) and alternative simplifications that might help identify, enroll, and retain children eligible for Medicaid and CHIP coverage. (author abstract)

    In September 2010, the Oklahoma Health Care Authority (OHCA) implemented the first realtime online enrollment system for Medicaid and the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP). Oklahoma’s system functions as an online application and uses a sophisticated rules engine that provides an eligibility determination instantly. Almost three-fourths (72 percent) of applicants are eligible to use the online enrollment system to apply for Medicaid and CHIP coverage, known as SoonerCare in Oklahoma. This report summarizes findings from a case study analyzing Oklahoma’s real-time online enrollment system, conducted as part of a larger study evaluating Express Lane Eligibility (ELE) and alternative simplifications that might help identify, enroll, and retain children eligible for Medicaid and CHIP coverage. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Golden, Olivia; Loprest, Pamela J. ; Adams, Gina
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2013

    In this commentary collection, twelve authors - national, state, and county leaders along with research and policy experts -- offer perspectives on lessons from the first year of Work Support Strategies (WSS). WSS is a multi-state initiative to design and test cutting-edge improvements in policy, service delivery, and technology to help low-income working families get and keep the benefits for which they are eligible. Its lessons will interest local, state, and federal officials seeking to integrate health and human services programs (Medicaid, SNAP, and child care assistance); health reform experts; and others who care about programs for low-income families. (Author abstract)

    In this commentary collection, twelve authors - national, state, and county leaders along with research and policy experts -- offer perspectives on lessons from the first year of Work Support Strategies (WSS). WSS is a multi-state initiative to design and test cutting-edge improvements in policy, service delivery, and technology to help low-income working families get and keep the benefits for which they are eligible. Its lessons will interest local, state, and federal officials seeking to integrate health and human services programs (Medicaid, SNAP, and child care assistance); health reform experts; and others who care about programs for low-income families. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Johnson-Staub, Christine
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2012

    This guide aims to help states look beyond the major sources of child care and early education funding and consider alternative federal financing sources to bring comprehensive services into early childhood settings. Why? Because the sources of child care funding historically available to states have limited supply and allowable uses, and comprehensive services are critical to the success of children – especially those who are most at risk for developmental challenges and delays. The information in this guide can help states go beyond Head Start and Child Care and Development Block Grant (CCDBG) funds to build on early childhood systems and improve access to services for children. Partnerships expanding access to comprehensive services in child care and early education settings can take different forms. They can build program staff’s capacity to directly provide services to children, or they can bring other professionals (e.g. mental health consultants, nurses, etc.) and resources into early childhood settings to collaborate with child care and early education staff. In this...

    This guide aims to help states look beyond the major sources of child care and early education funding and consider alternative federal financing sources to bring comprehensive services into early childhood settings. Why? Because the sources of child care funding historically available to states have limited supply and allowable uses, and comprehensive services are critical to the success of children – especially those who are most at risk for developmental challenges and delays. The information in this guide can help states go beyond Head Start and Child Care and Development Block Grant (CCDBG) funds to build on early childhood systems and improve access to services for children. Partnerships expanding access to comprehensive services in child care and early education settings can take different forms. They can build program staff’s capacity to directly provide services to children, or they can bring other professionals (e.g. mental health consultants, nurses, etc.) and resources into early childhood settings to collaborate with child care and early education staff. In this guide, we explore partnerships using federal funding streams to provide comprehensive services to children in early childhood settings. These partnerships may be administered directly by child care and early education agencies or by partner agencies with authority over the funds.  (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Kenney, Genevieve M.; Coyer, Christine
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2012

    This report to the Medicaid and CHIP Payment and Access Commission (MACPAC) was prepared to support MACPAC’s March 2012 Report to the Congress on Medicaid and CHIP. The report presents national findings on access to care for children with Medicaid or CHIP using measures from two national household surveys—the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) and the Household Component of the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS). These estimates give a national picture of how access to care for children enrolled in Medicaid/CHIP compares to that of children with ESI and uninsured children, building on prior reports and analyses. (author abstract)

    This report to the Medicaid and CHIP Payment and Access Commission (MACPAC) was prepared to support MACPAC’s March 2012 Report to the Congress on Medicaid and CHIP. The report presents national findings on access to care for children with Medicaid or CHIP using measures from two national household surveys—the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) and the Household Component of the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS). These estimates give a national picture of how access to care for children enrolled in Medicaid/CHIP compares to that of children with ESI and uninsured children, building on prior reports and analyses. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Shaefer, H. Luke; Grogan, Colleen M.; Pollack, Harold A.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2011

    This paper examines families of children who transition from private to public health insurance. These transitions include, but are not limited to, transitions that constitute crowd-out. We pool longitudinal panels from the Survey of Income and Program Participation (SIPP) covering 1990 to 2005. The annual rate of children who transition from private to public coverage more than doubled over this period, although it remains small. Transitioning children in recent years are typically in working families with median incomes of around 200% of poverty. Children who transition from private to public coverage are more likely to belong to minority groups, to have lower incomes, and to be in poorer health than children remaining privately insured. Public coverage now provides important protections for low-income working families, especially those with children in poor health. These findings underscore the need to implement post-health-reform policies with an eye towards possible adverse selection into public programs. (author abstract)

    This paper examines families of children who transition from private to public health insurance. These transitions include, but are not limited to, transitions that constitute crowd-out. We pool longitudinal panels from the Survey of Income and Program Participation (SIPP) covering 1990 to 2005. The annual rate of children who transition from private to public coverage more than doubled over this period, although it remains small. Transitioning children in recent years are typically in working families with median incomes of around 200% of poverty. Children who transition from private to public coverage are more likely to belong to minority groups, to have lower incomes, and to be in poorer health than children remaining privately insured. Public coverage now provides important protections for low-income working families, especially those with children in poor health. These findings underscore the need to implement post-health-reform policies with an eye towards possible adverse selection into public programs. (author abstract)

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