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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Lee, Bong Joo; Mackey-Bilaver, Lucy; Chin, Meejung
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2006

    Both joint or separate participation in the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) and the Food Stamp Program reduces the risk of child abuse or neglect and several nutrition-related health problems, such as anemia, failure to thrive, and nutritional deficiency. This study examines the relationship between WIC and Food Stamp Program participation and young children’s health and mistreatment outcomes. The analysis uses a unique individual-level longitudinal database that links administrative datasets on WIC and Food Stamp Program participation, Medicaid enrollment and claims, and child abuse and neglect reports in Illinois. (author abstract)

    Both joint or separate participation in the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) and the Food Stamp Program reduces the risk of child abuse or neglect and several nutrition-related health problems, such as anemia, failure to thrive, and nutritional deficiency. This study examines the relationship between WIC and Food Stamp Program participation and young children’s health and mistreatment outcomes. The analysis uses a unique individual-level longitudinal database that links administrative datasets on WIC and Food Stamp Program participation, Medicaid enrollment and claims, and child abuse and neglect reports in Illinois. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Racine, Elizabeth; Vaughn, Ashley; Laditka, Sarah
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2010

    This quasi-experimental pilot study explored farmers' market use among Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) participants and the effects of previous Farmers' Market Nutrition Program participation on farmers' market use. African-American women who were pregnant and enrolling in WIC in Washington, DC, and Charlotte, NC, participated in the study. Surveys were completed in May and June 2007 measuring farmers' market use, barriers to farmers' market use, previous Farmers' Market Nutrition Program participation, previous redemption of Farmers' Market Nutrition Program vouchers, and dietary consumption. Women in Washington, DC, might have previously participated in the Farmers' Market Nutrition Program, while women in Charlotte had no previous Farmers' Market Nutrition Program participation. Participants' average age was 24 years, average education was 12.2 years, and average daily fruit/vegetable consumption was 7.5 servings. Participants in Charlotte and Washington, DC, without previous Farmers' Market Nutrition Program participation had...

    This quasi-experimental pilot study explored farmers' market use among Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) participants and the effects of previous Farmers' Market Nutrition Program participation on farmers' market use. African-American women who were pregnant and enrolling in WIC in Washington, DC, and Charlotte, NC, participated in the study. Surveys were completed in May and June 2007 measuring farmers' market use, barriers to farmers' market use, previous Farmers' Market Nutrition Program participation, previous redemption of Farmers' Market Nutrition Program vouchers, and dietary consumption. Women in Washington, DC, might have previously participated in the Farmers' Market Nutrition Program, while women in Charlotte had no previous Farmers' Market Nutrition Program participation. Participants' average age was 24 years, average education was 12.2 years, and average daily fruit/vegetable consumption was 7.5 servings. Participants in Charlotte and Washington, DC, without previous Farmers' Market Nutrition Program participation had similar farmers' market use rates; those with previous Farmers' Market Nutrition Program participation in Washington, DC, had higher farmers' market use rates. Previous participation in the Farmers' Market Nutrition Program previous redemption of Farmers' Market Nutrition Program vouchers, and higher fruit/vegetable consumption were associated with farmers' market use. Controlling for city, women who previously redeemed Farmers' Market Nutrition Program vouchers were more likely to use a farmers' market. Commonly reported barriers were lack of farmers' markets close to home and lack of transportation to farmers' markets. Women who received and redeemed Farmers' Market Nutrition Program vouchers were much more likely to purchase fruits/vegetables at farmers' markets. Future research to explore barriers and incentives for farmers' market use among WIC participants in urban and rural settings is warranted. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Kropf, Mary; Holben, David ; Holcomb, John ; Anderson, Heidi
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2007

    This study identified differences between women from the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) and WIC/Farmers’ Market Nutrition Program participating households regarding household food security status, fruit and vegetable intake and behaviors, perceived diet quality, and education level; and assessed the relationship between household food security status and perceived diet quality and perceived health. Farmers’ Market Nutrition Program participants exhibit more indicators of a healthful diet, but appear not to be more food secure. Nutrition education regarding the benefits of fresh produce intake can help to improve diet quality and increase Farmers’ Market Nutrition Program participation. (author abstract)

    This study identified differences between women from the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) and WIC/Farmers’ Market Nutrition Program participating households regarding household food security status, fruit and vegetable intake and behaviors, perceived diet quality, and education level; and assessed the relationship between household food security status and perceived diet quality and perceived health. Farmers’ Market Nutrition Program participants exhibit more indicators of a healthful diet, but appear not to be more food secure. Nutrition education regarding the benefits of fresh produce intake can help to improve diet quality and increase Farmers’ Market Nutrition Program participation. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Montgomery, Debbie; Splett, Patricia
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 1997

    To determine whether breast-feeding of infants enrolled in the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) is associated with a reduction in Medicaid expenditures during the first 6 months of life; if so, to determine whether the reduction in Medicaid expenditures represents a positive economic benefit to society when WIC costs for these infants and their mothers are considered. Cohorts of exclusively breast-fed and formula-fed infants were tracked for 6 months to compare WIC costs and Medicaid expenditures. The sample consisted of 406 healthy infants who were breast-fed exclusively for at least 3 months and 470 healthy infants who were formula-fed exclusively. The infants, born between August 1, 1993, and December 31, 1993, were enrolled in WIC and Medicaid. Compared with formula-feeding, breast-feeding each infant enrolled in WIC saved $478 in WIC costs and Medicaid expenditures during the first 6 months of the infant's life, or $161 after consideration of the formula manufacturer's rebate. A Medicaid cost saving of $112 per infant was realized...

    To determine whether breast-feeding of infants enrolled in the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) is associated with a reduction in Medicaid expenditures during the first 6 months of life; if so, to determine whether the reduction in Medicaid expenditures represents a positive economic benefit to society when WIC costs for these infants and their mothers are considered. Cohorts of exclusively breast-fed and formula-fed infants were tracked for 6 months to compare WIC costs and Medicaid expenditures. The sample consisted of 406 healthy infants who were breast-fed exclusively for at least 3 months and 470 healthy infants who were formula-fed exclusively. The infants, born between August 1, 1993, and December 31, 1993, were enrolled in WIC and Medicaid. Compared with formula-feeding, breast-feeding each infant enrolled in WIC saved $478 in WIC costs and Medicaid expenditures during the first 6 months of the infant's life, or $161 after consideration of the formula manufacturer's rebate. A Medicaid cost saving of $112 per infant was realized by the breast-feeding cohort, and Medicaid pharmacy reimbursement costs for breast-fed infants were significantly lower, half that of formula-fed infants. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Carrasco, Rogelio; Dixit-Joshi, Sujata; Verel, Kelly; Cole, Kate
    Reference Type: SSRC Products
    Year: 2014

    On March 25, 2014, the Self-Sufficiency Research Clearinghouse (SSRC) hosted The Use and Impact of Federal Nutrition Programs at Farmers Markets Webinar featuring Rogelio Carrasco, Program Analyst at the Food and Nutrition Service (FNS), Dr. Sujata Dixit-Joshi from Westat, Kelly Verel from Project for Public Spaces, and Kate Cole, Masters in Public Health (MPH), from the University of Washington. This Webinar explored the role and impact of federal nutrition program use at local farmers markets, recent efforts to increase low-income family participation in local farmers markets, and the benefits and challenges presented to farmers market vendors in accepting public assistance benefits. This document contains the questions and answers discussed during the Webinar.

    View additional materials from the Webinar here. The...

    On March 25, 2014, the Self-Sufficiency Research Clearinghouse (SSRC) hosted The Use and Impact of Federal Nutrition Programs at Farmers Markets Webinar featuring Rogelio Carrasco, Program Analyst at the Food and Nutrition Service (FNS), Dr. Sujata Dixit-Joshi from Westat, Kelly Verel from Project for Public Spaces, and Kate Cole, Masters in Public Health (MPH), from the University of Washington. This Webinar explored the role and impact of federal nutrition program use at local farmers markets, recent efforts to increase low-income family participation in local farmers markets, and the benefits and challenges presented to farmers market vendors in accepting public assistance benefits. This document contains the questions and answers discussed during the Webinar.

    View additional materials from the Webinar here. The PowerPoint from the Webinar can be found here. The Webinar transcript can be found here.

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