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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Harper, Ed; Hirschman, Jay; Mabli, James; Nelson, Sandi; Hourihan, Kerianne
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2009

    The Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) provides food, nutrition education, breastfeeding support, and health care and social service referrals to nutritionally at-risk low-income pregnant women, new mothers, infants, and children through age 4. This report offers updated estimates of the population that met these criteria and was eligible for WIC benefits in each of the years 1994 through 2007. These revise a set of estimates published by the USDA Food and Nutrition Service (FNS) in 2006. The new series builds on the methodology recommended by the Committee on National Statistics of the National Research Council (CNSTAT) and more accurately captures changes in the breastfeeding practice of new mothers during their period of WIC eligibility. In 2007, 14.2 million individuals were eligible for WIC benefits in an average month. The program served 8.4 million, or 59 percent of those eligible. (author abstract)

    The Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) provides food, nutrition education, breastfeeding support, and health care and social service referrals to nutritionally at-risk low-income pregnant women, new mothers, infants, and children through age 4. This report offers updated estimates of the population that met these criteria and was eligible for WIC benefits in each of the years 1994 through 2007. These revise a set of estimates published by the USDA Food and Nutrition Service (FNS) in 2006. The new series builds on the methodology recommended by the Committee on National Statistics of the National Research Council (CNSTAT) and more accurately captures changes in the breastfeeding practice of new mothers during their period of WIC eligibility. In 2007, 14.2 million individuals were eligible for WIC benefits in an average month. The program served 8.4 million, or 59 percent of those eligible. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Colman, Silvie; Nichols-Barrer, Ira P.; Redline, Julie E.; Devaney, Barbara L.; Ansell, Sara V.; Joyce, Ted
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2012

    In recent years, the WIC program has continued to be the subject of much research. Researchers have produced more-refined methodological approaches and attempted to measure WIC’s impact on previously unmeasured outcomes. The present report is intended to update the literature review completed by Fox et al. (2004) by comprehensively reviewing all published research on WIC program impacts between 2002 and 2010 as well as “gray” or unpublished research completed between 1999 and 2010. Studies released during this interval include all currently available research that was not reviewed by Fox and her colleagues.

    This report begins with an overview of the WIC program, including its administrative structure and benefits, and a detailed description of the literature search protocol used to identify the studies included. The research overview begins with a discussion of selection issues related to WIC evaluations, and follows with a detailed discussion of the evidence on the association between WIC and specific health outcomes that have been grouped into seven categories: (1)...

    In recent years, the WIC program has continued to be the subject of much research. Researchers have produced more-refined methodological approaches and attempted to measure WIC’s impact on previously unmeasured outcomes. The present report is intended to update the literature review completed by Fox et al. (2004) by comprehensively reviewing all published research on WIC program impacts between 2002 and 2010 as well as “gray” or unpublished research completed between 1999 and 2010. Studies released during this interval include all currently available research that was not reviewed by Fox and her colleagues.

    This report begins with an overview of the WIC program, including its administrative structure and benefits, and a detailed description of the literature search protocol used to identify the studies included. The research overview begins with a discussion of selection issues related to WIC evaluations, and follows with a detailed discussion of the evidence on the association between WIC and specific health outcomes that have been grouped into seven categories: (1) pregnancy and birth outcomes; (2) infant feeding practices; (3) infant and child dietary intake, food security, and related outcomes; (4) infant and child growth; (5) child immunization; (6) health care utilization and associated costs; and (7) child health and socioemotional and cognitive development. Each outcome section discusses the approaches used to deal with selection bias, other methodological challenges (if applicable), an overview of the key findings, and a discussion of the strengths and weaknesses of the individual studies. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: U.S. Congress
    Reference Type: Statute
    Year: 2010

    This statute authorized funding and set policies for Federal child nutrition programs, such as the National School Lunch Program, the School Breakfast Program, the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC), the Summer Food Service Program, and the Child and Adult Care Food Program. 

    Public Law No. 111-296 (2010).

     

    This statute authorized funding and set policies for Federal child nutrition programs, such as the National School Lunch Program, the School Breakfast Program, the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC), the Summer Food Service Program, and the Child and Adult Care Food Program. 

    Public Law No. 111-296 (2010).

     

  • Individual Author: Gilbert, Danielle; Nanda, Joy; Paige, David
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2014

    Participation in women, infants and children (WIC), supplemental nutritional assistance program (SNAP), temporary assistance for needy families (TANF), and medical assistance program (MAP) programs provide critical nutrition and health benefits to low-income families. Concurrent enrollment in these programs provides a powerful safety net, yet simultaneous participation is reported to be low. Underutilization undermines program objectives, client well-being and food security. This paper examines concurrent participation among the most needy WIC clients, those at/below 100% of the federal poverty level (FPL), in SNAP, TANF and MAP. We examined the Maryland state WIC program infant electronic database (N = 34,409) for the 12-month period ending September 2010. Our analysis focused on two-thirds of these infants (N = 23,065) who were at/below the 100% FPL. Mothers’ mean age was 26.8 ± 6 years; 20.6% White; 52.7% African American, and 23.4% Hispanic. Approximately 10% of infants weighed <2,500 g and 1.5% weighed <1,500 g at birth. Average household income was $10,160; 55.7% were...

    Participation in women, infants and children (WIC), supplemental nutritional assistance program (SNAP), temporary assistance for needy families (TANF), and medical assistance program (MAP) programs provide critical nutrition and health benefits to low-income families. Concurrent enrollment in these programs provides a powerful safety net, yet simultaneous participation is reported to be low. Underutilization undermines program objectives, client well-being and food security. This paper examines concurrent participation among the most needy WIC clients, those at/below 100% of the federal poverty level (FPL), in SNAP, TANF and MAP. We examined the Maryland state WIC program infant electronic database (N = 34,409) for the 12-month period ending September 2010. Our analysis focused on two-thirds of these infants (N = 23,065) who were at/below the 100% FPL. Mothers’ mean age was 26.8 ± 6 years; 20.6% White; 52.7% African American, and 23.4% Hispanic. Approximately 10% of infants weighed <2,500 g and 1.5% weighed <1,500 g at birth. Average household income was $10,160; 55.7% were at/below 50% FPL. Two-thirds (68.4%) participated in MAP, 31% in SNAP and 9% in TANF. Only 8% were enrolled in all three programs whereas 28% were not enrolled in any. There was a statistically significant difference in mean age and household income between multi-program beneficiaries and mothers who solely participated in WIC: 25.6 ± 5 years and $7,298 ± $4,496 compared with 27.2 ± 6 years and $12,216 ± $6,920, respectively (p < 0.001). Among WIC families at or below 100% FPL, only 8% received multi-program benefits. Specific factors responsible for participation on an individual level are not available. To optimize enrollment, a coordinated effort is essential to identify and overcome barriers to concurrent participation among these families. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Cole, Kate; McNees, Molly; Kinney, Karen; Fisher, Kari; Krieger, James W.
    Reference Type:
    Year: 2013

    Increased acceptance of nutrition benefits at farmers markets could improve access to nutritious foods for low-income shoppers. The objective of this study was to evaluate a pilot project to increase participation by farmers markets and their vendors in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) and Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC). (author abstract)

    Increased acceptance of nutrition benefits at farmers markets could improve access to nutritious foods for low-income shoppers. The objective of this study was to evaluate a pilot project to increase participation by farmers markets and their vendors in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) and Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC). (author abstract)

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