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SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

  • Conduct a search and filter parameters as desired.
  • "Check" the box next to the resources for which you would like a citation.
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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Kropf, Mary; Holben, David ; Holcomb, John ; Anderson, Heidi
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2007

    This study identified differences between women from the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) and WIC/Farmers’ Market Nutrition Program participating households regarding household food security status, fruit and vegetable intake and behaviors, perceived diet quality, and education level; and assessed the relationship between household food security status and perceived diet quality and perceived health. Farmers’ Market Nutrition Program participants exhibit more indicators of a healthful diet, but appear not to be more food secure. Nutrition education regarding the benefits of fresh produce intake can help to improve diet quality and increase Farmers’ Market Nutrition Program participation. (author abstract)

    This study identified differences between women from the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) and WIC/Farmers’ Market Nutrition Program participating households regarding household food security status, fruit and vegetable intake and behaviors, perceived diet quality, and education level; and assessed the relationship between household food security status and perceived diet quality and perceived health. Farmers’ Market Nutrition Program participants exhibit more indicators of a healthful diet, but appear not to be more food secure. Nutrition education regarding the benefits of fresh produce intake can help to improve diet quality and increase Farmers’ Market Nutrition Program participation. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Kirlin, John A.; Cole, Nancy; Logan, Christopher; Kaufman, Phillip
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2003

    The Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) provides both nutrition education and supplemental foods for pregnant, breastfeeding, and post-partum women, infants, and children. These supplemental foods contain nutrients that nutritional research has found may otherwise be lacking in the diets of WIC recipients. State WIC agencies have implemented practices designed to reduce the cost of food packages containing these prescribed foods. For instance, one of the WIC program's primary cost-saving practices is negotiating rebate contracts with manufacturers of infant formula. Additional practices include limiting authorized vendors to stores with lower food prices; limiting approved brands, package sizes, forms, or prices; and negotiating rebates with food manufacturers or suppliers. There is concern that these practices may inadvertently counter the program's goal of providing supplemental foods and nutrition education. Based on a review of cost-containment practices in six States, including interviews with the various stakeholders and analysis of...

    The Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) provides both nutrition education and supplemental foods for pregnant, breastfeeding, and post-partum women, infants, and children. These supplemental foods contain nutrients that nutritional research has found may otherwise be lacking in the diets of WIC recipients. State WIC agencies have implemented practices designed to reduce the cost of food packages containing these prescribed foods. For instance, one of the WIC program's primary cost-saving practices is negotiating rebate contracts with manufacturers of infant formula. Additional practices include limiting authorized vendors to stores with lower food prices; limiting approved brands, package sizes, forms, or prices; and negotiating rebates with food manufacturers or suppliers. There is concern that these practices may inadvertently counter the program's goal of providing supplemental foods and nutrition education. Based on a review of cost-containment practices in six States, including interviews with the various stakeholders and analysis of WIC administrative files, the study draws three major conclusions: (1) cost-containment practices reduced average food package costs by 0.2 to 21.4 percent, depending on practices implemented and local conditions; (2) the cost-containment practices had few adverse outcomes for WIC participants; and (3) administrative costs of the practices were low, averaging about 1.5 percent of food package savings. (author abstract)