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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: National Responsible Fatherhood Clearinghouse
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2013

    Fatherhood programs provide services that support fathers in their roles as major influences in their children's lives. These programs are helping fathers create loving, nurturing relationships with their children and be actively involved in their lives. This toolkit draws on lessons learned and resources used by fatherhood programs in diverse locales throughout the nation. (Author abstract)

    Fatherhood programs provide services that support fathers in their roles as major influences in their children's lives. These programs are helping fathers create loving, nurturing relationships with their children and be actively involved in their lives. This toolkit draws on lessons learned and resources used by fatherhood programs in diverse locales throughout the nation. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Coley, Rebekah Levine; Schindler, Holly S.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2008

    Objective . This study assessed the supposition that fathers' parenting and economic contributions help to support maternal and family functioning. Design . Using longitudinal data from a representative sample of low-income families with young children (N = 402), semidifference models assessed whether fathers' parenting, cash, and in-kind contributions predicted maternal functioning (mothers' psychological distress and parenting stress) and family functioning (cognitive stimulation and family routines). Results . Increases in fathers' parenting contributions predicted declines in maternal psychological distress and parenting stress. Fathers' cash and in-kind contributions showed limited relations to maternal and family functioning. Interactions by fathers' residence status found few significant differences in links between resident and nonresident fathers. Conclusions . These results add empirical support to...

    Objective . This study assessed the supposition that fathers' parenting and economic contributions help to support maternal and family functioning. Design . Using longitudinal data from a representative sample of low-income families with young children (N = 402), semidifference models assessed whether fathers' parenting, cash, and in-kind contributions predicted maternal functioning (mothers' psychological distress and parenting stress) and family functioning (cognitive stimulation and family routines). Results . Increases in fathers' parenting contributions predicted declines in maternal psychological distress and parenting stress. Fathers' cash and in-kind contributions showed limited relations to maternal and family functioning. Interactions by fathers' residence status found few significant differences in links between resident and nonresident fathers. Conclusions . These results add empirical support to conceptual models delineating indirect pathways by which parental support may influence children. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Roy, Kevin; Palkovitz, Rob; Fagan, Jay
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2007

    In this paper, we examine the processes and contexts that allow nonresidential fathers to maintain close relationships with their children despite multiple life transitions. Specifically, we explore how development may not be an accumulation of normative statuses and turning points but an active and urgent strategizing to find alternative paths to participation as parents, partners, and workers. We focus on analyses of life history interviews collected from 146 fathers with demographic backgrounds parallel to those in the Fragile Families data set. Within this qualitative dataset, we focus on a subsample of particularly resilient fathers to explore the processes and contexts that shape transitory fathering and that cannot be captured in secondary analyses of large data sets. (author abstract)

    In this paper, we examine the processes and contexts that allow nonresidential fathers to maintain close relationships with their children despite multiple life transitions. Specifically, we explore how development may not be an accumulation of normative statuses and turning points but an active and urgent strategizing to find alternative paths to participation as parents, partners, and workers. We focus on analyses of life history interviews collected from 146 fathers with demographic backgrounds parallel to those in the Fragile Families data set. Within this qualitative dataset, we focus on a subsample of particularly resilient fathers to explore the processes and contexts that shape transitory fathering and that cannot be captured in secondary analyses of large data sets. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Bronte-Tinkew, Jacinta; Burkhauser, Mary; Metz, Allison J.R.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2012

    Over the last two decades there has been an increased societal and academic interest in the role of fathers, as well as promoting responsible fatherhood in families and communities. In turn, this interest has given rise to an increasing number of fatherhood interventions. Although many programs to support fatherhood exist, they often differ in terms of their goals, target populations, designs, methods of implementation and assessment. This article reviews key evaluation findings from fatherhood programs that have been rigorously evaluated (i.e., used random assignment design) in order to answer questions about "what works" in fatherhood programs. In so doing, it identifies elements of promising practice in programs considered effective. Conclusions about the state of research on the effectiveness of fatherhood interventions are also presented. (author abstract)

    Over the last two decades there has been an increased societal and academic interest in the role of fathers, as well as promoting responsible fatherhood in families and communities. In turn, this interest has given rise to an increasing number of fatherhood interventions. Although many programs to support fatherhood exist, they often differ in terms of their goals, target populations, designs, methods of implementation and assessment. This article reviews key evaluation findings from fatherhood programs that have been rigorously evaluated (i.e., used random assignment design) in order to answer questions about "what works" in fatherhood programs. In so doing, it identifies elements of promising practice in programs considered effective. Conclusions about the state of research on the effectiveness of fatherhood interventions are also presented. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Greene, Angela D.; Moore, Kristin A.
    Reference Type: Report, Journal Article
    Year: 2000

    This study uses early descriptive data from the National Evaluation of Welfare to Work Strategies (NEWWS) Child Outcome Study, a sub-study of the larger random assignment evaluation of the Federal JOBS program, to answer two timely and important questions. First, what factors predict father involvement among nonresident fathers of young children who receive welfare? And second, is nonresident father involvement associated with better outcomes for these children? The three measures of nonresident father involvement examined are father-child visitation, formal child support payments received through the welfare office, and informal child support, such as money given directly to the mother, groceries, clothes, or other items. Findings reveal that while only 16.6% of fathers provided child support through the formal system during the past year, a considerably larger proportion, 42.3%, provided informal child support, and 67% visited at least once in the past year. Informal support and father-child visitation are the most highly correlated forms of involvement, and they share many of...

    This study uses early descriptive data from the National Evaluation of Welfare to Work Strategies (NEWWS) Child Outcome Study, a sub-study of the larger random assignment evaluation of the Federal JOBS program, to answer two timely and important questions. First, what factors predict father involvement among nonresident fathers of young children who receive welfare? And second, is nonresident father involvement associated with better outcomes for these children? The three measures of nonresident father involvement examined are father-child visitation, formal child support payments received through the welfare office, and informal child support, such as money given directly to the mother, groceries, clothes, or other items. Findings reveal that while only 16.6% of fathers provided child support through the formal system during the past year, a considerably larger proportion, 42.3%, provided informal child support, and 67% visited at least once in the past year. Informal support and father-child visitation are the most highly correlated forms of involvement, and they share many of the same predictors. Only two predictors are significant and in the same direction for all three measures of nonresident father involvement. Father's residence in the same state as the focal child and the provision of support for the child from the father's family are associated with a higher likelihood of his involvement. In general, findings for the child well-being measures show that monetary and material contributions from the father, especially contributions provided informally, are positively associated with more positive child well-being outcomes. (author abstract)

    This article was adapted from a report developed by Child Trends October 1996.

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