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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Hoag, Sheila; Swinburn, Adam
    Reference Type:
    Year: 2013

    In September 2010, the Oklahoma Health Care Authority (OHCA) implemented the first realtime online enrollment system for Medicaid and the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP). Oklahoma’s system functions as an online application and uses a sophisticated rules engine that provides an eligibility determination instantly. Almost three-fourths (72 percent) of applicants are eligible to use the online enrollment system to apply for Medicaid and CHIP coverage, known as SoonerCare in Oklahoma. This report summarizes findings from a case study analyzing Oklahoma’s real-time online enrollment system, conducted as part of a larger study evaluating Express Lane Eligibility (ELE) and alternative simplifications that might help identify, enroll, and retain children eligible for Medicaid and CHIP coverage. (author abstract)

    In September 2010, the Oklahoma Health Care Authority (OHCA) implemented the first realtime online enrollment system for Medicaid and the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP). Oklahoma’s system functions as an online application and uses a sophisticated rules engine that provides an eligibility determination instantly. Almost three-fourths (72 percent) of applicants are eligible to use the online enrollment system to apply for Medicaid and CHIP coverage, known as SoonerCare in Oklahoma. This report summarizes findings from a case study analyzing Oklahoma’s real-time online enrollment system, conducted as part of a larger study evaluating Express Lane Eligibility (ELE) and alternative simplifications that might help identify, enroll, and retain children eligible for Medicaid and CHIP coverage. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Rosenbaum, Sara
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2013

    The article discusses the state of Medicaid in the wake of the U.S. Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA), with particular focus on the prospects for further healthcare reform given the political landscapes surrounding the program. It states that Medicaid was largely transformed by the ACA, but needs further reform to be part of a comprehensive national plan to provide universal health insurance coverage. It adds that the potential decline of Medicaid will be a strong political determination than a program driven mainly by health policy. (author abstract)

    The article discusses the state of Medicaid in the wake of the U.S. Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA), with particular focus on the prospects for further healthcare reform given the political landscapes surrounding the program. It states that Medicaid was largely transformed by the ACA, but needs further reform to be part of a comprehensive national plan to provide universal health insurance coverage. It adds that the potential decline of Medicaid will be a strong political determination than a program driven mainly by health policy. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Liu, Su; Croake, Sarah
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2010

    The Medicaid Buy-In program is a key component of the federal effort to make it easier for people with disabilities to work without losing health benefits. Authorized by the Balanced Budget Act of 1997 (BBA) and the Ticket to Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act of 1999 (Ticket Act), the Buy-In program allows states to expand Medicaid coverage to workers with disabilities whose income and assets would ordinarily make them ineligible for Medicaid. To be eligible for the Buy-In program, an individual must have a disability (as defined by the Social Security Administration, SSA) and earned income, and must meet other financial eligibility requirements established by states. States have some flexibility to customize their Buy-In programs to their unique needs, resources and objectives. As of December 31, 2009, 37 states with a Medicaid Infrastructure Grant (MIG) reported covering slightly more than 150,000 individuals in the Medicaid Buy-In program.

    This issue brief, the eleventh in a series on workers with disabilities, provides an in-depth profile of Buy-In participants...

    The Medicaid Buy-In program is a key component of the federal effort to make it easier for people with disabilities to work without losing health benefits. Authorized by the Balanced Budget Act of 1997 (BBA) and the Ticket to Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act of 1999 (Ticket Act), the Buy-In program allows states to expand Medicaid coverage to workers with disabilities whose income and assets would ordinarily make them ineligible for Medicaid. To be eligible for the Buy-In program, an individual must have a disability (as defined by the Social Security Administration, SSA) and earned income, and must meet other financial eligibility requirements established by states. States have some flexibility to customize their Buy-In programs to their unique needs, resources and objectives. As of December 31, 2009, 37 states with a Medicaid Infrastructure Grant (MIG) reported covering slightly more than 150,000 individuals in the Medicaid Buy-In program.

    This issue brief, the eleventh in a series on workers with disabilities, provides an in-depth profile of Buy-In participants who have severe mental illness and compares their characteristics, employment experiences, and medical expenditures with those of other participants in the program. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Families USA
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2009

    Recent Census data reveal that Medicaid and CHIP have served as an effective health care safety net for many newly uninsured and impoverished families. These programs have greatly softened the blow of the recession and offset some of the losses in job-based coverage, working especially well for low-income children (for whom eligibility levels are generally higher than the eligibility levels for their parents).

    However, Medicaid in its current form cannot help all of the low-income people who have been affected by the recession, for two reasons: many states set their Medicaid eligibility levels for parents at extremely low levels; and in 42 states, adults without dependent children are not eligible for Medicaid, regardless of their income.

    Without health reform, millions of low-income families will continue to fall through the cracks in our health care system, adding to the ranks of the uninsured. Enacting national health reform will likely raise the Medicaid eligibility level to 133 percent of poverty for all Americans, helping states close the holes in the health...

    Recent Census data reveal that Medicaid and CHIP have served as an effective health care safety net for many newly uninsured and impoverished families. These programs have greatly softened the blow of the recession and offset some of the losses in job-based coverage, working especially well for low-income children (for whom eligibility levels are generally higher than the eligibility levels for their parents).

    However, Medicaid in its current form cannot help all of the low-income people who have been affected by the recession, for two reasons: many states set their Medicaid eligibility levels for parents at extremely low levels; and in 42 states, adults without dependent children are not eligible for Medicaid, regardless of their income.

    Without health reform, millions of low-income families will continue to fall through the cracks in our health care system, adding to the ranks of the uninsured. Enacting national health reform will likely raise the Medicaid eligibility level to 133 percent of poverty for all Americans, helping states close the holes in the health care safety net so that all low-income people have access to high-quality, affordable health care. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: U.S. Congress
    Reference Type: Statute
    Year: 2009

    This statute reauthorized the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP), providing additional funding and making changes to both CHIP and Medicaid. It also authorized new federal funding for outreach to children who were eligible for Medicaid or CHIP, but not enrolled. 

    Public Law No. 111-3 (2009).

     

    This statute reauthorized the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP), providing additional funding and making changes to both CHIP and Medicaid. It also authorized new federal funding for outreach to children who were eligible for Medicaid or CHIP, but not enrolled. 

    Public Law No. 111-3 (2009).

     

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