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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: Livermore, Gina; Hoffman, Denise; Bardos, Maura
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2012

    In July 2008, we implemented regulation changes to the Ticket to Work (TTW) program to increase the financial incentives for service providers to participate in the program. This report compares the characteristics and outcomes of two groups of TTW participants – those who assigned their Tickets before we implemented the revised regulations, and those who assigned their Tickets after. In this report, we assess whether the group that assigned their Tickets before the regulation changes is the same or different from the group that assigned their Tickets after in terms of the characteristics of beneficiaries, the types and intensity of services received, the employment expectations and outcomes of TTW participants, and participant satisfaction with TTW. We also provide updated information about the characteristics and employment-related outcomes of TTW participants based on data in the 2010 National Beneficiary Survey (NBS), analogous to the detailed statistics on TTW participants based on earlier rounds of the NBS and presented in previous TTW evaluation reports.

    This is the...

    In July 2008, we implemented regulation changes to the Ticket to Work (TTW) program to increase the financial incentives for service providers to participate in the program. This report compares the characteristics and outcomes of two groups of TTW participants – those who assigned their Tickets before we implemented the revised regulations, and those who assigned their Tickets after. In this report, we assess whether the group that assigned their Tickets before the regulation changes is the same or different from the group that assigned their Tickets after in terms of the characteristics of beneficiaries, the types and intensity of services received, the employment expectations and outcomes of TTW participants, and participant satisfaction with TTW. We also provide updated information about the characteristics and employment-related outcomes of TTW participants based on data in the 2010 National Beneficiary Survey (NBS), analogous to the detailed statistics on TTW participants based on earlier rounds of the NBS and presented in previous TTW evaluation reports.

    This is the fifth in a series of reports that make up the seventh Ticket to Work evaluation report. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Holzer, Harry J.
    Reference Type: Book Chapter/Book
    Year: 2011

    How well do our education policies prepare America’s youth for the labor market? What challenges limit our success, and what opportunities do we have for improvements? Can public policy play a greater role in encouraging more success? I consider these questions as they apply to the unique characteristics of metropolitan areas in the U.S. Most labor markets are metropolitan in nature, with workers commuting across central-city and suburban municipalities to jobs wherever they are located. In most metro areas, jobs (especially those paying higher wages) and different groups of residents are distributed unevenly; white and minority residents and those with higher and lower incomes are often quite highly segregated from each other residentially. These characteristics of metro areas should be taken into account as we consider what kinds of education and workforce policies and reforms to implement.

    This paper begins with a brief overview of the future U.S. labor market, including a review of trends in the demand for labor. In particular, I consider demand for both middle- and...

    How well do our education policies prepare America’s youth for the labor market? What challenges limit our success, and what opportunities do we have for improvements? Can public policy play a greater role in encouraging more success? I consider these questions as they apply to the unique characteristics of metropolitan areas in the U.S. Most labor markets are metropolitan in nature, with workers commuting across central-city and suburban municipalities to jobs wherever they are located. In most metro areas, jobs (especially those paying higher wages) and different groups of residents are distributed unevenly; white and minority residents and those with higher and lower incomes are often quite highly segregated from each other residentially. These characteristics of metro areas should be taken into account as we consider what kinds of education and workforce policies and reforms to implement.

    This paper begins with a brief overview of the future U.S. labor market, including a review of trends in the demand for labor. In particular, I consider demand for both middle- and high-skill jobs, where the former are defined as those requiring some postsecondary education or training (broadly defined) beyond a high school diploma but less than a bachelor’s degree, and the latter are defined as those requiring a bachelor’s or higher. I then review the challenges limiting so many young Americans as they prepare for the labor market, as well as what we know about programs and policies that might improve observed outcomes.(author abstract)

    This chapter is based on a working paper published by the National Poverty Center at the University of Michigan and a discussion paper published by the Institute for Research on Poverty at the University of Wisconsin.

  • Individual Author: Dworsky, Amy
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2005

    This study uses administrative data to examine the self-sufficiency of 8511 former foster youth who were discharged from Wisconsin's out-of-home care system between 1992 and 1998 and were at least 16 years old at the time they were discharged. Three indicators of self-sufficiency were measured: employment, earnings and public assistance receipt. The youth were followed from the quarter in which they were discharged through the fourth quarter of 2000. Most were employed in at least one of the first eight quarters after their discharge, but relatively few had earnings in all eight. Quarterly earnings increased over time, but remained very low. Earnings were still below the poverty threshold even eight years post-discharge. Nearly one fifth of the youth received AFDC/TANF cash assistance in at least one of their first eight quarters after their discharge, and nearly one third received food stamps. Implementation of welfare reform was associated with a reduction in public assistance receipt, although other economic factors are also likely to have contributed to this downward trend....

    This study uses administrative data to examine the self-sufficiency of 8511 former foster youth who were discharged from Wisconsin's out-of-home care system between 1992 and 1998 and were at least 16 years old at the time they were discharged. Three indicators of self-sufficiency were measured: employment, earnings and public assistance receipt. The youth were followed from the quarter in which they were discharged through the fourth quarter of 2000. Most were employed in at least one of the first eight quarters after their discharge, but relatively few had earnings in all eight. Quarterly earnings increased over time, but remained very low. Earnings were still below the poverty threshold even eight years post-discharge. Nearly one fifth of the youth received AFDC/TANF cash assistance in at least one of their first eight quarters after their discharge, and nearly one third received food stamps. Implementation of welfare reform was associated with a reduction in public assistance receipt, although other economic factors are also likely to have contributed to this downward trend. Relationships between these outcome measures and both the demographic characteristics and out-of-home care experiences of these former foster youth were examined using multivariate statistical techniques. The policy and practice implications of the findings are discussed. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Relave, Nanette
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2006

    Funding for youth employment and training has been scaled back during the past few decades. In addition, funding for workforce development services is spread among multiple programs and agencies, resulting in a fragmented funding environment. To address this issue, the youth provisions of the Workforce Investment Act (WIA) aimed to move this patchwork system toward a more comprehensive approach for serving youth. The legislation establishes a framework for providing youth workforce development services at the local level. Yet funding for the WIA Youth Program is quite limited, and while WIA aims to improve the coordination of resources across youth-serving programs, it does not mandate resource sharing. To overcome these financing challenges and sustain successful youth programs, leaders must identify and access funding from an array of public and private sources. This brief discusses strategies for finding resources to support youth workforce development services and highlights examples of innovative approaches. It seeks to provide program and community leaders, as well as...

    Funding for youth employment and training has been scaled back during the past few decades. In addition, funding for workforce development services is spread among multiple programs and agencies, resulting in a fragmented funding environment. To address this issue, the youth provisions of the Workforce Investment Act (WIA) aimed to move this patchwork system toward a more comprehensive approach for serving youth. The legislation establishes a framework for providing youth workforce development services at the local level. Yet funding for the WIA Youth Program is quite limited, and while WIA aims to improve the coordination of resources across youth-serving programs, it does not mandate resource sharing. To overcome these financing challenges and sustain successful youth programs, leaders must identify and access funding from an array of public and private sources. This brief discusses strategies for finding resources to support youth workforce development services and highlights examples of innovative approaches. It seeks to provide program and community leaders, as well as policymakers, with ideas for supporting critical youth workforce development services. This brief highlights the following four strategies that program leaders and policymakers can use to find resources to support workforce development services for youth: (1) Maximizing federal resources; (2) Building public-private partnerships; (3) Accessing education dollars; and (4) Coordinating resources and services. These strategies encourage program leaders to look beyond WIA funds to access and coordinate different funding sources--from federal, state, and local governments as well as from private groups--to support workforce development services for youth. A list of additional resources concludes the brief (author abstract)

    The original hyperlink to this resource has been removed by the publisher. You may obtain a single use PDF by emailing the SSRC at ssrc@opressrc.org.

  • Individual Author: Carnevale, Anthony P.; Hanson, Andrew R.; Gulish, Artem
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2013

    Failure to Launch: Structural Shift and the New Lost Generation analyzes the divergent labor market trends for young and older adults since 1980. The report is a joint effort by the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce and The Generations Initiative. (author abstract)

     

    Failure to Launch: Structural Shift and the New Lost Generation analyzes the divergent labor market trends for young and older adults since 1980. The report is a joint effort by the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce and The Generations Initiative. (author abstract)

     

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