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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: Carlson, Deven; Haveman, Robert; Kaplan, Tom; Wolfe, Barbara
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2009

    The federal Housing Choice Voucher (Section 8) Program provides eligible low-income families with an income-conditioned voucher that pays for a portion of rental costs in privately owned, affordable housing units. This paper extends prior research on the effectiveness of rental support programs in several ways. The analysis employs a unique longitudinal dataset created by combining administrative records maintained by the State of Wisconsin with census block group data. We use a propensity score matching approach coupled with difference-in-differences regression analysis to estimate the effect of housing voucher receipt on the employment and earnings of voucher recipients; we track these effects for five years following voucher receipt. Our results indicate that voucher receipt has a generally positive effect on employment, but a negative impact on earnings. The negative earnings effect is largest in the years following initial receipt of the rental voucher, and dissipates over time. We find that the pattern of recipient labor market responses to voucher receipt differs...

    The federal Housing Choice Voucher (Section 8) Program provides eligible low-income families with an income-conditioned voucher that pays for a portion of rental costs in privately owned, affordable housing units. This paper extends prior research on the effectiveness of rental support programs in several ways. The analysis employs a unique longitudinal dataset created by combining administrative records maintained by the State of Wisconsin with census block group data. We use a propensity score matching approach coupled with difference-in-differences regression analysis to estimate the effect of housing voucher receipt on the employment and earnings of voucher recipients; we track these effects for five years following voucher receipt. Our results indicate that voucher receipt has a generally positive effect on employment, but a negative impact on earnings. The negative earnings effect is largest in the years following initial receipt of the rental voucher, and dissipates over time. We find that the pattern of recipient labor market responses to voucher receipt differs substantially among demographic subgroups. In addition to our overall results, we present sensitivity results involving alternative estimation methods, as well as distinctions between those who receive transitory voucher support and those who are long-term recipients. (author abstract)

    A journal article based on this working paper was published in 2012.

  • Individual Author: Institute for Children, Poverty, and Homelessness
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2013

    Rapid rehousing or "housing first" has been heralded as the answer to ending family homelessness. New York City has the longest history with using rapid rehousing as a tool for placing homeless families into permanent housing. In this opinion brief, ICPH President and CEO Ralph Nunez points to New York City as a case study and takes a critical look at the long-term impact of federally driven rapid-rehousing policies. The brief raises fundamental questions about the effectiveness of rapid rehousing as a solution when it is used in a one-size-fits all manner.(author abstract)

    Rapid rehousing or "housing first" has been heralded as the answer to ending family homelessness. New York City has the longest history with using rapid rehousing as a tool for placing homeless families into permanent housing. In this opinion brief, ICPH President and CEO Ralph Nunez points to New York City as a case study and takes a critical look at the long-term impact of federally driven rapid-rehousing policies. The brief raises fundamental questions about the effectiveness of rapid rehousing as a solution when it is used in a one-size-fits all manner.(author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Berger, Lawrence M.; Heintze, Theresa ; Naidich, Wendy B.; Meyers, Marcia K.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2009

    We investigate associations of housing assistance with housing and food-related hardship among low-income single-mother households using data from the National Survey of America’s Families (N = 5,396). Results from instrumental variables models suggest that receipt of unit-based assistance, such as traditional public housing, is associated with a large decrease in rent burden and modest decreases in difficulty paying rent or utilities and residential crowding. Receipt of tenant-based assistance, such as housing vouchers or certificates, is associated with a modest increase in housing stability but also with modest increases in rent burden and difficulty paying rent or utilities. We find no associations between either type of housing assistance and food related hardship. (author abstract)

    We investigate associations of housing assistance with housing and food-related hardship among low-income single-mother households using data from the National Survey of America’s Families (N = 5,396). Results from instrumental variables models suggest that receipt of unit-based assistance, such as traditional public housing, is associated with a large decrease in rent burden and modest decreases in difficulty paying rent or utilities and residential crowding. Receipt of tenant-based assistance, such as housing vouchers or certificates, is associated with a modest increase in housing stability but also with modest increases in rent burden and difficulty paying rent or utilities. We find no associations between either type of housing assistance and food related hardship. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Khadduri, Jill
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2005

    This concept paper on measuring the performance of programs that serve homeless people has three objectives. It is intended to:

    • Help the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) improve and expand upon national reporting of performance for HUD programs that serve homeless people;

    • Help state and local planners, program administrators, and homeless assistance providers design expanded performance measurement systems that are tailored to local needs and client populations; and

    • Help HUD and other federal agencies streamline and coordinate national reporting of performance across federal government programs that serve homeless people, including plans for the use of new Homeless Management Information Systems (HMIS) for national performance reporting.

    On February 8 and 9, 2005, HUD sponsored a meeting of state and local practitioners and policy-makers, national advocacy organizations, federal agency staff, and researchers and consultants to discuss these topics. An earlier version of this concept paper served as background for that...

    This concept paper on measuring the performance of programs that serve homeless people has three objectives. It is intended to:

    • Help the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) improve and expand upon national reporting of performance for HUD programs that serve homeless people;

    • Help state and local planners, program administrators, and homeless assistance providers design expanded performance measurement systems that are tailored to local needs and client populations; and

    • Help HUD and other federal agencies streamline and coordinate national reporting of performance across federal government programs that serve homeless people, including plans for the use of new Homeless Management Information Systems (HMIS) for national performance reporting.

    On February 8 and 9, 2005, HUD sponsored a meeting of state and local practitioners and policy-makers, national advocacy organizations, federal agency staff, and researchers and consultants to discuss these topics. An earlier version of this concept paper served as background for that meeting, and was revised to reflect the insights and information that emerge from the meeting. In addition, the paper incorporates comments received at a meeting of the National Human Services Data Consortium in Phoenix on April 12, 2005. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Cortes, Alvaro; Lam, Ken; Fein, David
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2008

    In 1998, public housing agencies (PHAs) were given considerable discretion to select tenants on the basis of local PHA preferences rather than on old federal preferences for households experiencing housing-related hardships. Many PHAs have adopted other categorical preferences. As a result, the demographic profile and household composition of public housing tenants have changed. These changes have important implications for the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development’s Housing Choice Voucher Program (HCVP), because past research has found that household characteristics and location factors significantly affect a household’s length of stay in the program. The study described in this article uses administrative data to explore the factors associated with a household’s length of stay in the HCVP. The study focuses on the degree to which the presence of children of varying ages affects a household’s length of stay in the program and the degree to which older children, as a potential source of childcare, may mitigate a longer duration of housing assistance. The study also...

    In 1998, public housing agencies (PHAs) were given considerable discretion to select tenants on the basis of local PHA preferences rather than on old federal preferences for households experiencing housing-related hardships. Many PHAs have adopted other categorical preferences. As a result, the demographic profile and household composition of public housing tenants have changed. These changes have important implications for the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development’s Housing Choice Voucher Program (HCVP), because past research has found that household characteristics and location factors significantly affect a household’s length of stay in the program. The study described in this article uses administrative data to explore the factors associated with a household’s length of stay in the HCVP. The study focuses on the degree to which the presence of children of varying ages affects a household’s length of stay in the program and the degree to which older children, as a potential source of childcare, may mitigate a longer duration of housing assistance. The study also explores the degree to which the disability status of the household head or children affects a household’s length of stay in the program. The study’s main finding is that the presence of an infant or a toddler increases a household’s length of stay in the HCVP, after controlling for an array of household and location characteristics, but the presence of other children in the same household attenuates this effect. Conversely, the study finds that the presence of teenagers, especially male teenagers, magnifies this effect. (author abstract)

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