Skip to main content
Back to Top

SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

  • Conduct a search and filter parameters as desired.
  • "Check" the box next to the resources for which you would like a citation.
  • Select "Download Selected Citation" at the top of the Library Search Page.
  • Select your export style:
    • Text File.
    • RIS Format.
    • APA format.
  • Select submit and download your citations.

The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Anthony, Elizabeth K.; Vu, Catherine M.; Austin, Michael J.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2008

    In a ‘child-only’ case the adult is not included in the welfare benefit calculation and aid is provided only for the child(ren). The proportion of child-only cases within the caseloads of the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) welfare program continues to increase while overall TANF cases decrease. Given relatively limited information about the children and adults in child-only cases, this analysis presents the major findings from a review of studies on characteristics of children and caregivers in child-only cases with implications for child welfare and welfare-to-work services. (author abstract)

    In a ‘child-only’ case the adult is not included in the welfare benefit calculation and aid is provided only for the child(ren). The proportion of child-only cases within the caseloads of the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) welfare program continues to increase while overall TANF cases decrease. Given relatively limited information about the children and adults in child-only cases, this analysis presents the major findings from a review of studies on characteristics of children and caregivers in child-only cases with implications for child welfare and welfare-to-work services. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Hamilton, Mary Agnes; Hamilton, Stephen F.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2008

    Child-only cases, "minors who receive welfare benefits as individuals, lose their eligibility at age 18 but face the same challenges to self-sufficiency as other “emerging adults.” This study examines how 59 youth in 4 New York State communities thought about and prepared for the termination of their benefits. In 8 focus groups and 12 follow-up interviews they spoke of their aspirations for education, employment, relationships with people, and material possessions. The external supports they can rely upon appear to be inadequate to overcome their limited financial resources and other external obstacles they also identified. Recommendations are intended to strengthen community supports for these youth and others in poverty, which in turn could increase access to social capital and financial aid, as they undertake their precarious passage to adulthood. (author abstract)

    Child-only cases, "minors who receive welfare benefits as individuals, lose their eligibility at age 18 but face the same challenges to self-sufficiency as other “emerging adults.” This study examines how 59 youth in 4 New York State communities thought about and prepared for the termination of their benefits. In 8 focus groups and 12 follow-up interviews they spoke of their aspirations for education, employment, relationships with people, and material possessions. The external supports they can rely upon appear to be inadequate to overcome their limited financial resources and other external obstacles they also identified. Recommendations are intended to strengthen community supports for these youth and others in poverty, which in turn could increase access to social capital and financial aid, as they undertake their precarious passage to adulthood. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Sheran, Michelle; Swann, Christopher A.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2007

    Many children in private kinship care arrangements live in families that endure financial hardships. Even though these families are eligible for TANF child-only grants, only one in five receives cash assistance. The purpose of this study is to better understand the take-up of cash assistance for this group. Using national level data, we explore the relationships among child and caregiver characteristics and the receipt of cash assistance. We provide evidence that disadvantaged families are more likely to receive cash assistance than less disadvantaged families. For example, older caregivers and those with less education have higher take-up rates than their counterparts. Similarly, being poor and having received welfare in the past increase the likelihood that assistance is received. Nonetheless, it is important to note that take-up rates are low compared to other social programs. Our results suggest some possible reasons for this. For instance, our findings point to the possibility that many private kinship care families do not take-up cash assistance because they do not know...

    Many children in private kinship care arrangements live in families that endure financial hardships. Even though these families are eligible for TANF child-only grants, only one in five receives cash assistance. The purpose of this study is to better understand the take-up of cash assistance for this group. Using national level data, we explore the relationships among child and caregiver characteristics and the receipt of cash assistance. We provide evidence that disadvantaged families are more likely to receive cash assistance than less disadvantaged families. For example, older caregivers and those with less education have higher take-up rates than their counterparts. Similarly, being poor and having received welfare in the past increase the likelihood that assistance is received. Nonetheless, it is important to note that take-up rates are low compared to other social programs. Our results suggest some possible reasons for this. For instance, our findings point to the possibility that many private kinship care families do not take-up cash assistance because they do not know that they are eligible for it through the TANF program. This suggests that outreach may improve participation. It also raises the issue of whether the receipt of cash assistance could be improved if benefits were provided through a program other than TANF. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Blair, Kevin D.; Taylor, David B.; Rivera, Craig J.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2009

    This article presents the results from 77 interviews with kinship caregivers participating in the child-only component of the TANF program. The authors interviewed caregivers using the Strengths and Stressors Tracking Device (SSTD). Key findings include: most caregivers and their families possess significant strengths that can be used in a strengths-based approach to case management; environmental stress—an acknowledged ecological correlate with potential for abuse and neglect—is an area of strength; and permanency planning and long-term stability of the kinship care situation should be a major focus of social services and case managers. This research offers a valuable contribution to child welfare and kinship care literature because it provides evidence-based research to demonstrate the significant strengths in a caregiving population. (author abstract)

    This article presents the results from 77 interviews with kinship caregivers participating in the child-only component of the TANF program. The authors interviewed caregivers using the Strengths and Stressors Tracking Device (SSTD). Key findings include: most caregivers and their families possess significant strengths that can be used in a strengths-based approach to case management; environmental stress—an acknowledged ecological correlate with potential for abuse and neglect—is an area of strength; and permanency planning and long-term stability of the kinship care situation should be a major focus of social services and case managers. This research offers a valuable contribution to child welfare and kinship care literature because it provides evidence-based research to demonstrate the significant strengths in a caregiving population. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Nelson, Justine G.; Gibson, Priscilla A.; Bauer, Jean W.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2010

    Several U.S. social policies identify kinship care as the preferred out-of-home placement. However, financial assistance to defray the cost of kinship caregiving is limited. One option is the child-only welfare grant. This study investigates kinship households' eligibility for, utilization of, and educational benefits associated with these grants. Most kinship households are eligible for these grants, which in 2003 provided a median monthly benefit of $227. However, analysis of National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health data indicates that few eligible kinship households receive the grants. Regression analysis indicates that an increase in this amount of monthly household income during adolescence is associated with a 7% greater likelihood of kinship youth graduating from high school. (author abstract)

    Several U.S. social policies identify kinship care as the preferred out-of-home placement. However, financial assistance to defray the cost of kinship caregiving is limited. One option is the child-only welfare grant. This study investigates kinship households' eligibility for, utilization of, and educational benefits associated with these grants. Most kinship households are eligible for these grants, which in 2003 provided a median monthly benefit of $227. However, analysis of National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health data indicates that few eligible kinship households receive the grants. Regression analysis indicates that an increase in this amount of monthly household income during adolescence is associated with a 7% greater likelihood of kinship youth graduating from high school. (author abstract)

Sort by

Topical Area(s)

Popular Searches

Source

Year

Year ranges from 1999 to 2016

Reference Type

Research Methodology

Geographic Focus

Target Populations