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SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

  • Conduct a search and filter parameters as desired.
  • "Check" the box next to the resources for which you would like a citation.
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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Johnson, Anna D.; Martin, Anne; Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2013

    The federal child-care subsidy program represents one of the government’s largest investments in early care and education. Using data from the nationally representative Early Childhood Longitudinal Study–Birth Cohort, this study examines associations, among subsidy-eligible families, between child-care subsidy receipt when children are 4 years old and a range of school readiness outcomes in kindergarten (sample n=1,400). Findings suggest that subsidy receipt in preschool is not directly linked to subsequent reading or social-emotional skills. However, subsidy receipt predicted lower math scores among children attending community-based centers. Supplementary analyses revealed that subsidies predicted greater use of center care, but this association did not appear to affect school readiness. (author abstract)

    The federal child-care subsidy program represents one of the government’s largest investments in early care and education. Using data from the nationally representative Early Childhood Longitudinal Study–Birth Cohort, this study examines associations, among subsidy-eligible families, between child-care subsidy receipt when children are 4 years old and a range of school readiness outcomes in kindergarten (sample n=1,400). Findings suggest that subsidy receipt in preschool is not directly linked to subsequent reading or social-emotional skills. However, subsidy receipt predicted lower math scores among children attending community-based centers. Supplementary analyses revealed that subsidies predicted greater use of center care, but this association did not appear to affect school readiness. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Ziliak, James P.; Hokayem, Charles; Hardy, Bradley
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2008

    The purpose of this report is to provide a selective survey of the literature on the economic consequences of child care for recipient families, and to relate the results to families residing in Kentucky using data from the Annual Social and Economic Study in the Current Population Survey. The survey is selective both because of its exclusive focus on child care research by economists and because the literature is vast even within economics such that only articles deemed to be important contributions to the labor supply and child care literature are included. There are extensive literatures on child care in the fields of social work and sociology, but in a bid to narrow the focus on the types of questions and methodologies employed this survey excludes this research. The implication is that certain topics relating to child care quality and child well being that are more prominent in social work and sociology research will receive scant attention. Instead the focus will be on the labor-market implications of child care, which tends to be the primary domain of child care research...

    The purpose of this report is to provide a selective survey of the literature on the economic consequences of child care for recipient families, and to relate the results to families residing in Kentucky using data from the Annual Social and Economic Study in the Current Population Survey. The survey is selective both because of its exclusive focus on child care research by economists and because the literature is vast even within economics such that only articles deemed to be important contributions to the labor supply and child care literature are included. There are extensive literatures on child care in the fields of social work and sociology, but in a bid to narrow the focus on the types of questions and methodologies employed this survey excludes this research. The implication is that certain topics relating to child care quality and child well being that are more prominent in social work and sociology research will receive scant attention. Instead the focus will be on the labor-market implications of child care, which tends to be the primary domain of child care research in economics. The restriction to key contributions in economics is based both on objective criteria such as prominence of the article in the profession, as well as our own personal biases regarding methodology and topic. A more comprehensive review of the economics of child care is found in Blau. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Paulsell, Diane
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2001

    Discussion about the extent to which the government could and should invest in the child care market has increased among policymakers. This report summarizes a conference convened by ASPE to engage a multidisciplinary group of economists, developmental psychologists, child care researchers, and policy analysts in a dialogue about the rationale for public investment in quality child care. (author abstract)

    Discussion about the extent to which the government could and should invest in the child care market has increased among policymakers. This report summarizes a conference convened by ASPE to engage a multidisciplinary group of economists, developmental psychologists, child care researchers, and policy analysts in a dialogue about the rationale for public investment in quality child care. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Magnuson, Katherine A.
    Reference Type: SSRC Products
    Year: 2012

    On December 6, 2012, the Self-Sufficiency Research Clearinghouse (SSRC) hosted the Early Care and Education: Self-Sufficiency Implications for Parents and Children Webinar featuring Dr. Katherine Magnuson. During the Webinar, Dr. Magnuson provided an overview of government-funded early education initiatives and discussed empirical evidence about the effectiveness of programs in promoting family economic self-sufficiency as well as school readiness. Policy and research recommendations for parents and children were also discussed.

    Dr. Magnuson was the first Emerging Scholar, and was featured from October-December 2012. Dr. Magnuson, an Associate Professor of Social Work at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

    An interactive question and answer session followed the formal presentation and this document provides a record of that dialogue. The recording from the Webinar as well as more information on Dr. Magnuson and her work can be found here. The transcript from Dr. Magnuson's Webinar can...

    On December 6, 2012, the Self-Sufficiency Research Clearinghouse (SSRC) hosted the Early Care and Education: Self-Sufficiency Implications for Parents and Children Webinar featuring Dr. Katherine Magnuson. During the Webinar, Dr. Magnuson provided an overview of government-funded early education initiatives and discussed empirical evidence about the effectiveness of programs in promoting family economic self-sufficiency as well as school readiness. Policy and research recommendations for parents and children were also discussed.

    Dr. Magnuson was the first Emerging Scholar, and was featured from October-December 2012. Dr. Magnuson, an Associate Professor of Social Work at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

    An interactive question and answer session followed the formal presentation and this document provides a record of that dialogue. The recording from the Webinar as well as more information on Dr. Magnuson and her work can be found here. The transcript from Dr. Magnuson's Webinar can be found here. Dr. Magnuson's PowerPoint from the Webinar can be found here.

  • Individual Author: Magnuson, Katherine A.
    Reference Type: SSRC Products
    Year: 2012

    On December 6, 2012, the Self-Sufficiency Research Clearinghouse (SSRC) hosted the Early Care and Education: Self-Sufficiency Implications for Parents and Children Webinar featuring Dr. Katherine Magnuson. During the Webinar, Dr. Magnuson provided an overview of government-funded early education initiatives and discussed empirical evidence about the effectiveness of programs in promoting family economic self-sufficiency as well as school readiness. Policy and research recommendations for parents and children were also discussed.

    Dr. Magnuson was the first Emerging Scholar, and was featured from October-December 2012. Dr. Magnuson, an Associate Professor of Social Work at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

    This document is the PowerPoint for the Webinar. The Webinar recording as well as more information on Dr. Magnuson and her work can be found here. The transcript from Dr. Magnuson's Webinar can be found...

    On December 6, 2012, the Self-Sufficiency Research Clearinghouse (SSRC) hosted the Early Care and Education: Self-Sufficiency Implications for Parents and Children Webinar featuring Dr. Katherine Magnuson. During the Webinar, Dr. Magnuson provided an overview of government-funded early education initiatives and discussed empirical evidence about the effectiveness of programs in promoting family economic self-sufficiency as well as school readiness. Policy and research recommendations for parents and children were also discussed.

    Dr. Magnuson was the first Emerging Scholar, and was featured from October-December 2012. Dr. Magnuson, an Associate Professor of Social Work at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

    This document is the PowerPoint for the Webinar. The Webinar recording as well as more information on Dr. Magnuson and her work can be found here. The transcript from Dr. Magnuson's Webinar can be found here. A record of the question and answer session from Dr. Magnuson's Webinar can be found here.

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