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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Heinrich, Carolyn J.; Smeeding, Timothy M.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2014

    This policy brief, the second of two drawn from the IRP and CHASP conference on "Building Human Capital and Economic Potential," examines the special challenges of people with less than a high school diploma, ex-offenders, and young single mothers and policy options to address them. (author abstract)

    This policy brief, the second of two drawn from the IRP and CHASP conference on "Building Human Capital and Economic Potential," examines the special challenges of people with less than a high school diploma, ex-offenders, and young single mothers and policy options to address them. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Russinova, Zlatka; Rogers, E. Sally; Ellison, Marsha Langer; Bloch, Philippe; Lyass, Asya; Wewiorski, Nancy
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2013

    This study explored the predictors of financial self-sufficiency among Social Security beneficiaries with psychiatric disabilities. The study was conducted with individuals who were either past or current disability beneficiaries and who had sustained competitive employment as evidenced by their involvement in a longitudinal investigation on sustained employment among persons with serious mental illnesses. We conducted an exploratory cross-sectional study employing a survey methodology to determine what factors were associated with participants' capacity to leave the Social Security disability rolls due to gainful employment. We used a stepwise approach to data analysis to explore the association of demographic, clinical, vocational and motivational factors with financial self-sufficiency. Results suggested that individuals with higher occupational status, higher levels of proactive coping and without medical comorbidities were more likely to terminate Social Security disability benefits and achieve financial self-sufficiency due to gainful employment. Study findings can inform...

    This study explored the predictors of financial self-sufficiency among Social Security beneficiaries with psychiatric disabilities. The study was conducted with individuals who were either past or current disability beneficiaries and who had sustained competitive employment as evidenced by their involvement in a longitudinal investigation on sustained employment among persons with serious mental illnesses. We conducted an exploratory cross-sectional study employing a survey methodology to determine what factors were associated with participants' capacity to leave the Social Security disability rolls due to gainful employment. We used a stepwise approach to data analysis to explore the association of demographic, clinical, vocational and motivational factors with financial self-sufficiency. Results suggested that individuals with higher occupational status, higher levels of proactive coping and without medical comorbidities were more likely to terminate Social Security disability benefits and achieve financial self-sufficiency due to gainful employment. Study findings can inform the development of innovative interventions targeting these malleable predictors associated with financial self-sufficiency among persons with psychiatric disabilities. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: De Marco, Allison
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2012

    During the Great Recession the US experienced its longest and worst recession since the Great Depression, evidenced by high unemployment, unprecedented job losses, and long-term unemployment. Particularly hard hit, in North Carolina the unemployment rate remained higher for longer than the four previous recessions (NC Employment Security Commission, 2011). This study uses data from the North Carolina sample of the Family Life Project, a representative sample of predominantly low-income, rural families oversampled for African American and low income families, to examine how the economic downturn impacted residents’ employment in the rural South and how those conditions are related to economic strain and food insecurity. There is a comparative dearth of information available on rural poverty, however, it is critical to address these issues because of disproportionate rates of poverty and limited access to services in low wealth, rural communities. We use NC data from the 36-month home visit, collected 7/06 – 10/07, to capture conditions prior to the recession and the 58-month home...

    During the Great Recession the US experienced its longest and worst recession since the Great Depression, evidenced by high unemployment, unprecedented job losses, and long-term unemployment. Particularly hard hit, in North Carolina the unemployment rate remained higher for longer than the four previous recessions (NC Employment Security Commission, 2011). This study uses data from the North Carolina sample of the Family Life Project, a representative sample of predominantly low-income, rural families oversampled for African American and low income families, to examine how the economic downturn impacted residents’ employment in the rural South and how those conditions are related to economic strain and food insecurity. There is a comparative dearth of information available on rural poverty, however, it is critical to address these issues because of disproportionate rates of poverty and limited access to services in low wealth, rural communities. We use NC data from the 36-month home visit, collected 7/06 – 10/07, to capture conditions prior to the recession and the 58-month home visit, collected 7/08 – 12/09, to capture conditions during the recession. During the recession 36% of these NC families reported a major employment change (starting/stopping a job, major changes in responsibilities, such as a promotion/demotion, significant change in hours); 23.5% went from working a standard to a nonstandard shift (evening, night, and rotating); while over 10% saw their employment become less stable, moving from permanent to temporary jobs. In regression analysis, maternal education and rurality predicted work distress. Work distress was related to increased economic strain and lead to increased use TANF, SNAP, and Unemployment Insurance. Social support and SNAP use buffered experiences of food insecurity. This knowledge will enable policy-makers to make more informed decisions about how to modify policies and programs to better match the situations present in these communities.  (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Livermore, Gina; Stapleton, David; Roche, Allison
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2009

    This report presents a profile of all working-age (age 18 to 64) SSI and DI beneficiaries. It is the second in a series of reports that make up the fifth Ticket to Work evaluation report. The report focuses on selected personal characteristics, activities, and outcomes closely associated with employment. The profile is based on data from a recent nationally representative survey of working-age SSI and DI beneficiaries Because of important differences between SSI and DI program eligibility criteria, target populations, and treatment of earnings, we also present separate profiles for SSI-only, DI-only, and concurrent (those receiving both SSI and DI) beneficiaries.

    The period of analysis is prior to SSA’s implementation of new Ticket to Work program regulations in July of 2008, and so reflects experiences under the original Ticket to Work rules. The findings indicate that many SSI and DI beneficiaries were working and engaging in work-preparation activities, and many more saw themselves working in the future. In 2006, about half of all beneficiaries reported having work-...

    This report presents a profile of all working-age (age 18 to 64) SSI and DI beneficiaries. It is the second in a series of reports that make up the fifth Ticket to Work evaluation report. The report focuses on selected personal characteristics, activities, and outcomes closely associated with employment. The profile is based on data from a recent nationally representative survey of working-age SSI and DI beneficiaries Because of important differences between SSI and DI program eligibility criteria, target populations, and treatment of earnings, we also present separate profiles for SSI-only, DI-only, and concurrent (those receiving both SSI and DI) beneficiaries.

    The period of analysis is prior to SSA’s implementation of new Ticket to Work program regulations in July of 2008, and so reflects experiences under the original Ticket to Work rules. The findings indicate that many SSI and DI beneficiaries were working and engaging in work-preparation activities, and many more saw themselves working in the future. In 2006, about half of all beneficiaries reported having work-related goals or expectations, had recently received employment-related services or training, and/or had recently been employed. But the jobs secured by beneficiaries did not pay well in general; nor did they offer much in the way of benefits.

    Although many beneficiaries were working, and many more wanted to work, the findings also indicate that there was a high prevalence of certain characteristics, circumstances, and experiences among beneficiaries that stood between them and employment. Other barriers included the fact that few beneficiaries were aware of the work incentive provisions available in the SSI and DI programs, and most were living in households at or near the federal poverty level. As a result, they and their families relied on means-tested public programs for which eligibility could be jeopardized by earnings. Despite these barriers to employment, the large share of beneficiaries who indicated an interest in employment—either through their actions or expectations—suggests that policies designed to promote and support work might be successful if they can address the wide array of obstacles facing beneficiaries in their attempts to work and contribute to their own independence. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Passarella, Letitia; Born, Catherine
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2013

    The goal of this project was to determine whether clients who self-assess their health as fair or poor are more likely to have barriers than those who rate their health as excellent, very good, or good; and if this was true, what type of barriers do these clients have and what is the effect on welfare use and employment. We found that clients with a fair or poor health rating had more barriers, received more months of cash assistance, were less likely to work, and earned less than those with a more positive assessment of their health. (author abstract)

    The goal of this project was to determine whether clients who self-assess their health as fair or poor are more likely to have barriers than those who rate their health as excellent, very good, or good; and if this was true, what type of barriers do these clients have and what is the effect on welfare use and employment. We found that clients with a fair or poor health rating had more barriers, received more months of cash assistance, were less likely to work, and earned less than those with a more positive assessment of their health. (author abstract)

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