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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Blumberg, Linda J.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2012

    In October 2012, Linda J. Blumberg, an economist and senior fellow at the Health Policy Center of the Urban Institute, presented a seminar at IRP on "Implementation of the Affordable Care Act: Early Experiences in Ten States." Her talk drew a large crowd of faculty and students from across campus over a range of disciplines, and sparked considerable discussion. This brief extends Blumberg's talk to include a look at the pre-reform health care system as well as examination of the ways in which low-income families stand to benefit from the Affordable Care Act (ACA) reforms. (author abstract)

    In October 2012, Linda J. Blumberg, an economist and senior fellow at the Health Policy Center of the Urban Institute, presented a seminar at IRP on "Implementation of the Affordable Care Act: Early Experiences in Ten States." Her talk drew a large crowd of faculty and students from across campus over a range of disciplines, and sparked considerable discussion. This brief extends Blumberg's talk to include a look at the pre-reform health care system as well as examination of the ways in which low-income families stand to benefit from the Affordable Care Act (ACA) reforms. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Liu, Su; Croake, Sarah
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2010

    The Medicaid Buy-In program is a key component of the federal effort to make it easier for people with disabilities to work without losing health benefits. Authorized by the Balanced Budget Act of 1997 (BBA) and the Ticket to Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act of 1999 (Ticket Act), the Buy-In program allows states to expand Medicaid coverage to workers with disabilities whose income and assets would ordinarily make them ineligible for Medicaid. To be eligible for the Buy-In program, an individual must have a disability (as defined by the Social Security Administration, SSA) and earned income, and must meet other financial eligibility requirements established by states. States have some flexibility to customize their Buy-In programs to their unique needs, resources and objectives. As of December 31, 2009, 37 states with a Medicaid Infrastructure Grant (MIG) reported covering slightly more than 150,000 individuals in the Medicaid Buy-In program.

    This issue brief, the eleventh in a series on workers with disabilities, provides an in-depth profile of Buy-In participants...

    The Medicaid Buy-In program is a key component of the federal effort to make it easier for people with disabilities to work without losing health benefits. Authorized by the Balanced Budget Act of 1997 (BBA) and the Ticket to Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act of 1999 (Ticket Act), the Buy-In program allows states to expand Medicaid coverage to workers with disabilities whose income and assets would ordinarily make them ineligible for Medicaid. To be eligible for the Buy-In program, an individual must have a disability (as defined by the Social Security Administration, SSA) and earned income, and must meet other financial eligibility requirements established by states. States have some flexibility to customize their Buy-In programs to their unique needs, resources and objectives. As of December 31, 2009, 37 states with a Medicaid Infrastructure Grant (MIG) reported covering slightly more than 150,000 individuals in the Medicaid Buy-In program.

    This issue brief, the eleventh in a series on workers with disabilities, provides an in-depth profile of Buy-In participants who have severe mental illness and compares their characteristics, employment experiences, and medical expenditures with those of other participants in the program. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Shaefer, H. Luke; Sammons, Elizabeth D.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2009

    The U.S. social safety net exacerbates labor market inequalities rather than ameliorating them. This paper traces this theme within an important historical case study: the emergence of the employer-based health insurance system. Employers became the dominant and tax-preferred provider of health insurance in the United States without any federal legislative action. Understanding how this happened may inform current reform efforts. This case study highlights two important factors. The first is path dependency, discussed by Skocpol (1992) and Pierson (2000). They argue that the ambiguous divisions of power and a pluralistic governance framework favor incremental processes of social policy formation in the United States. The second factor is the divisions within the American workforce (Esping-Andersen, 1990). Divisions by race and sex have often led to disadvantaged workers being left out or underserved by U.S. social welfare policy. (author abstract)

    The U.S. social safety net exacerbates labor market inequalities rather than ameliorating them. This paper traces this theme within an important historical case study: the emergence of the employer-based health insurance system. Employers became the dominant and tax-preferred provider of health insurance in the United States without any federal legislative action. Understanding how this happened may inform current reform efforts. This case study highlights two important factors. The first is path dependency, discussed by Skocpol (1992) and Pierson (2000). They argue that the ambiguous divisions of power and a pluralistic governance framework favor incremental processes of social policy formation in the United States. The second factor is the divisions within the American workforce (Esping-Andersen, 1990). Divisions by race and sex have often led to disadvantaged workers being left out or underserved by U.S. social welfare policy. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Legerski, Elizabeth M.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2012

    The number of uninsured Americans has risen substantially over the last decade. Despite the availability of Medicaid, low-income women are at particularly elevated risk of having no or inadequate health insurance. How does continuity of work, family, and welfare affect low-income women’s health insurance status? A multinomial logistic regression analysis of 1,662 low-income women from the Welfare, Children, and Families: A Three-City Study provides evidence of the consequences of life changes on access to health insurance from 1999–2005. The results show that compared to those with stable welfare, work, and family attachments, new full-time employment actually increases low-income women’s risk of being uninsured as does being underemployed, on welfare, or single for extended periods of time. These findings illustrate how health-care reform must adequately address the complexity of low-income women’s lives—including the ways labor market, state, and family factors interact to create barriers to health insurance—in order to improve access to care under the current U.S. health...

    The number of uninsured Americans has risen substantially over the last decade. Despite the availability of Medicaid, low-income women are at particularly elevated risk of having no or inadequate health insurance. How does continuity of work, family, and welfare affect low-income women’s health insurance status? A multinomial logistic regression analysis of 1,662 low-income women from the Welfare, Children, and Families: A Three-City Study provides evidence of the consequences of life changes on access to health insurance from 1999–2005. The results show that compared to those with stable welfare, work, and family attachments, new full-time employment actually increases low-income women’s risk of being uninsured as does being underemployed, on welfare, or single for extended periods of time. These findings illustrate how health-care reform must adequately address the complexity of low-income women’s lives—including the ways labor market, state, and family factors interact to create barriers to health insurance—in order to improve access to care under the current U.S. health insurance model. (author abstract) 

  • Individual Author: Berenson, Julia; Doty, Michelle M.; Abrams, Melinda K.; Shih, Anthony
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2012

    In the United States, uninsured and low-income adults experience substantial health and health care inequities when compared with insured and higher-income individuals. A new analysis of the Commonwealth Fund 2010 Biennial Health Insurance Survey demonstrates that when low-income adults have both health insurance and a medical home, they are less likely to report cost-related access problems, more likely to be up-to-date with preventive screenings, and report greater satisfaction with the quality of their care. Moreover, the gaps in health care between them and higher-income populations are significantly reduced. The Affordable Care Act includes numerous provisions that will significantly expand health insurance coverage, especially to low-income patients, as well as provisions to promote medical homes. Along with supporting the full implementation of coverage expansions, it will be important for public and private stakeholders to create opportunities that enhance access to medical homes for vulnerable populations. (author abstract)

    In the United States, uninsured and low-income adults experience substantial health and health care inequities when compared with insured and higher-income individuals. A new analysis of the Commonwealth Fund 2010 Biennial Health Insurance Survey demonstrates that when low-income adults have both health insurance and a medical home, they are less likely to report cost-related access problems, more likely to be up-to-date with preventive screenings, and report greater satisfaction with the quality of their care. Moreover, the gaps in health care between them and higher-income populations are significantly reduced. The Affordable Care Act includes numerous provisions that will significantly expand health insurance coverage, especially to low-income patients, as well as provisions to promote medical homes. Along with supporting the full implementation of coverage expansions, it will be important for public and private stakeholders to create opportunities that enhance access to medical homes for vulnerable populations. (author abstract)

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