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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: National Women's Law Center
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2012

    As most states gradually begin to recover economically after several years in which their budgets were under tremendous strain, a number of the states are taking this opportunity to make or consider new investments in early care and education. These states recognize that early care and education will advance their short- and longterm economic prosperity by enabling parents to work and giving children the strong start they need to succeed in school and ultimately contribute to the workforce. Unfortunately, a few states have looked to cut child care and early education. Cutting these services reduces families’ access to the stable, high-quality child care that encourages children’s learning and development. Additionally, these cuts prevent child care programs from filling their classrooms, forcing them to lay off staff or close their doors entirely. (Author abstract)

    As most states gradually begin to recover economically after several years in which their budgets were under tremendous strain, a number of the states are taking this opportunity to make or consider new investments in early care and education. These states recognize that early care and education will advance their short- and longterm economic prosperity by enabling parents to work and giving children the strong start they need to succeed in school and ultimately contribute to the workforce. Unfortunately, a few states have looked to cut child care and early education. Cutting these services reduces families’ access to the stable, high-quality child care that encourages children’s learning and development. Additionally, these cuts prevent child care programs from filling their classrooms, forcing them to lay off staff or close their doors entirely. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Colvard, Jamie; Schmit, Stephanie
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2012

    All babies need good health, strong families, and positive early learning experiences to foster their healthy intellectual, social, and emotional development. Unfortunately, far too few young children receive the supports they need to build a strong foundation for future growth. Infants and toddlers living in households under great economic stress are more likely to face challenges that negatively impact their development. Research shows that young children growing up in poverty experience poorer health, higher incidence of developmental delays and learning disabilities, hunger, and more reported cases of abuse and neglect compared to their peers. As a result, they are less likely to be successful in school and productive in the labor force as adults. The recent economic recession significantly increased the number of families struggling, and the number of infants and toddlers at risk for these outcomes. In 2010, 1 in 4 children under age 3 was living in poverty (defined as less than 100 percent of the federal poverty level), and almost half were living in low-income families (...

    All babies need good health, strong families, and positive early learning experiences to foster their healthy intellectual, social, and emotional development. Unfortunately, far too few young children receive the supports they need to build a strong foundation for future growth. Infants and toddlers living in households under great economic stress are more likely to face challenges that negatively impact their development. Research shows that young children growing up in poverty experience poorer health, higher incidence of developmental delays and learning disabilities, hunger, and more reported cases of abuse and neglect compared to their peers. As a result, they are less likely to be successful in school and productive in the labor force as adults. The recent economic recession significantly increased the number of families struggling, and the number of infants and toddlers at risk for these outcomes. In 2010, 1 in 4 children under age 3 was living in poverty (defined as less than 100 percent of the federal poverty level), and almost half were living in low-income families (less than 200 percent of the federal poverty level). This represents an increase of 15 percent and 8 percent respectively from just five years earlier. Providing supports to vulnerable infants, toddlers, and their families is essential to putting young children on a path toward healthy development.

    The federal Early Head Start (EHS) program was created in 1994 to address the comprehensive needs of children under age 3 in low-income families and vulnerable low-income pregnant women. In addition to early learning opportunities, EHS’s comprehensive early childhood development programs provide children and families with access to a range of services such as health screenings, referrals and follow-up support, parenting resources, and social services. Research shows that EHS positively impacts children’s cognitive, language, and social-emotional development; family self-sufficiency; and parental support of child development. (author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Paulsell, Diane
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2001

    Discussion about the extent to which the government could and should invest in the child care market has increased among policymakers. This report summarizes a conference convened by ASPE to engage a multidisciplinary group of economists, developmental psychologists, child care researchers, and policy analysts in a dialogue about the rationale for public investment in quality child care. (author abstract)

    Discussion about the extent to which the government could and should invest in the child care market has increased among policymakers. This report summarizes a conference convened by ASPE to engage a multidisciplinary group of economists, developmental psychologists, child care researchers, and policy analysts in a dialogue about the rationale for public investment in quality child care. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Paulsell, Diane; Cohen, Julie; Stieglitz, Ali; Lurie-Hurvitz, Erica; Fenichel, Emily; Kisker, Ellen
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2002

    Describes promising strategies for building community collaborations and partnerships, as well as preliminary themes that may be helpful for programs, communities, and policymakers interested in developing, implementing, and supporting child care partnerships. Focusing on Early Head Start, the authors note that many partnerships have succeeded in expanding access and improving quality, although challenges remain, especially when state licensing requirements differ from partners' performance standards. Achieving and maintaining continuity of care has also been challenging. (author abstract)

    Describes promising strategies for building community collaborations and partnerships, as well as preliminary themes that may be helpful for programs, communities, and policymakers interested in developing, implementing, and supporting child care partnerships. Focusing on Early Head Start, the authors note that many partnerships have succeeded in expanding access and improving quality, although challenges remain, especially when state licensing requirements differ from partners' performance standards. Achieving and maintaining continuity of care has also been challenging. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Magnuson, Katherine A.
    Reference Type: SSRC Products
    Year: 2012

    On December 6, 2012, the Self-Sufficiency Research Clearinghouse (SSRC) hosted the Early Care and Education: Self-Sufficiency Implications for Parents and Children Webinar featuring Dr. Katherine Magnuson. During the Webinar, Dr. Magnuson provided an overview of government-funded early education initiatives and discussed empirical evidence about the effectiveness of programs in promoting family economic self-sufficiency as well as school readiness. Policy and research recommendations for parents and children were also discussed.

    Dr. Magnuson was the first Emerging Scholar, and was featured from October-December 2012. Dr. Magnuson, an Associate Professor of Social Work at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

    An interactive question and answer session followed the formal presentation and this document provides a record of that dialogue. The recording from the Webinar as well as more information on Dr. Magnuson and her work can be found here. The transcript from Dr. Magnuson's Webinar can...

    On December 6, 2012, the Self-Sufficiency Research Clearinghouse (SSRC) hosted the Early Care and Education: Self-Sufficiency Implications for Parents and Children Webinar featuring Dr. Katherine Magnuson. During the Webinar, Dr. Magnuson provided an overview of government-funded early education initiatives and discussed empirical evidence about the effectiveness of programs in promoting family economic self-sufficiency as well as school readiness. Policy and research recommendations for parents and children were also discussed.

    Dr. Magnuson was the first Emerging Scholar, and was featured from October-December 2012. Dr. Magnuson, an Associate Professor of Social Work at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

    An interactive question and answer session followed the formal presentation and this document provides a record of that dialogue. The recording from the Webinar as well as more information on Dr. Magnuson and her work can be found here. The transcript from Dr. Magnuson's Webinar can be found here. Dr. Magnuson's PowerPoint from the Webinar can be found here.

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