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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: National Women's Law Center
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2012

    As most states gradually begin to recover economically after several years in which their budgets were under tremendous strain, a number of the states are taking this opportunity to make or consider new investments in early care and education. These states recognize that early care and education will advance their short- and longterm economic prosperity by enabling parents to work and giving children the strong start they need to succeed in school and ultimately contribute to the workforce. Unfortunately, a few states have looked to cut child care and early education. Cutting these services reduces families’ access to the stable, high-quality child care that encourages children’s learning and development. Additionally, these cuts prevent child care programs from filling their classrooms, forcing them to lay off staff or close their doors entirely. (author abstract)

    As most states gradually begin to recover economically after several years in which their budgets were under tremendous strain, a number of the states are taking this opportunity to make or consider new investments in early care and education. These states recognize that early care and education will advance their short- and longterm economic prosperity by enabling parents to work and giving children the strong start they need to succeed in school and ultimately contribute to the workforce. Unfortunately, a few states have looked to cut child care and early education. Cutting these services reduces families’ access to the stable, high-quality child care that encourages children’s learning and development. Additionally, these cuts prevent child care programs from filling their classrooms, forcing them to lay off staff or close their doors entirely. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Burke, Mike; Sims, Kate; Anderson, Signe; FirtzSimons, Crystal; Hewins, Jessie
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2013

    When the school year ends, millions of low-income children lose access to the school breakfasts and lunches they rely on during the school year. The federal Summer Nutrition Programs—the Summer Food Service Program (SFSP) and the National School Lunch Program (NSLP)—are designed to replace the regular school year programs, providing low-income children access to the nutritious meals they need to keep hunger at bay and remain healthy throughout the summer. The meals provided through the Summer Nutrition Programs also play an important role in drawing children into educational, enrichment, and recreational programming that keep them learning, engaged, active, safe, and moving during school vacation. (author abstract)

    When the school year ends, millions of low-income children lose access to the school breakfasts and lunches they rely on during the school year. The federal Summer Nutrition Programs—the Summer Food Service Program (SFSP) and the National School Lunch Program (NSLP)—are designed to replace the regular school year programs, providing low-income children access to the nutritious meals they need to keep hunger at bay and remain healthy throughout the summer. The meals provided through the Summer Nutrition Programs also play an important role in drawing children into educational, enrichment, and recreational programming that keep them learning, engaged, active, safe, and moving during school vacation. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Fantuzzo, John; LeBoeuf, Whitney; Brumley, Benjamin; Perlman, Staci
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2013

    Child homelessness and educational well-being is an area of national research that requires more precise investigation to address mixed findings. The aim of this study was to extend the investigation of the relations between homelessness and educational well-being by determining if timing and frequency of homeless episodes are differentially associated with children's academic and classroom engagement outcomes. This investigation used a comprehensive research model to study the effects of these homeless episode characteristics within a large urban student cohort. Additionally, this study accounted for co-occurring early risk factors. Findings indicated that having a first homeless episode in early childhood was associated with non-proficiency in mathematics and academic engagement problems. Also more frequent homeless episodes were related to truancy in third grade. These results stress the importance of early intervention for homeless children and underscore the need to further understand the variation in young children's homeless experiences. (author abstract)

    Child homelessness and educational well-being is an area of national research that requires more precise investigation to address mixed findings. The aim of this study was to extend the investigation of the relations between homelessness and educational well-being by determining if timing and frequency of homeless episodes are differentially associated with children's academic and classroom engagement outcomes. This investigation used a comprehensive research model to study the effects of these homeless episode characteristics within a large urban student cohort. Additionally, this study accounted for co-occurring early risk factors. Findings indicated that having a first homeless episode in early childhood was associated with non-proficiency in mathematics and academic engagement problems. Also more frequent homeless episodes were related to truancy in third grade. These results stress the importance of early intervention for homeless children and underscore the need to further understand the variation in young children's homeless experiences. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Aber, J. Lawrence; Grannis, Kerry Searle; Owen, Stephanie; Sawhill, Isabel V.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2013

    This study uses data from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Kindergarten Class of 1998-1999 (ECLS-K) to analyze competencies that children need to master by the end of elementary school, the extent to which they are doing so, what might be done to improve their performance, and how this might affect their ultimate ability to earn a living and their chances of being middle class by middle age. Both academic skills and socio-emotional skills contribute to core competency. We measure core competence at age eleven using five outcomes: math skills, reading skills, self-regulation, behavior problems, and physical health. (author introduction)

    This study uses data from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Kindergarten Class of 1998-1999 (ECLS-K) to analyze competencies that children need to master by the end of elementary school, the extent to which they are doing so, what might be done to improve their performance, and how this might affect their ultimate ability to earn a living and their chances of being middle class by middle age. Both academic skills and socio-emotional skills contribute to core competency. We measure core competence at age eleven using five outcomes: math skills, reading skills, self-regulation, behavior problems, and physical health. (author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Harris, Linda
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2010

    More than a decade ago the Workforce Investment Act of 1998 restructured the youth service delivery system in this country to provide more intensive services of longer duration; to infuse the best of youth development programming; to build the youth service delivery capacity in communities of high poverty; and through youth councils, to introduce more strategic and collaborative approaches to youth programming. These are very important and well intentioned principles that should be retained and strengthened in a reauthorized bill. However, the WIA youth system, for many reasons, has fallen short of what is needed to prepare youth for the 21st century economy.

    In the decade since passage of WIA legislation we have seen a continuation of high dropout rates with nearly one half million youth dropping out annually. Youth employment has been steadily declining with current rate or youth unemployment at lowest level in 60 years. The current economic and unemployment crisis, and slow pace of job recovery suggests that the employment situation for youth Consider that there is an...

    More than a decade ago the Workforce Investment Act of 1998 restructured the youth service delivery system in this country to provide more intensive services of longer duration; to infuse the best of youth development programming; to build the youth service delivery capacity in communities of high poverty; and through youth councils, to introduce more strategic and collaborative approaches to youth programming. These are very important and well intentioned principles that should be retained and strengthened in a reauthorized bill. However, the WIA youth system, for many reasons, has fallen short of what is needed to prepare youth for the 21st century economy.

    In the decade since passage of WIA legislation we have seen a continuation of high dropout rates with nearly one half million youth dropping out annually. Youth employment has been steadily declining with current rate or youth unemployment at lowest level in 60 years. The current economic and unemployment crisis, and slow pace of job recovery suggests that the employment situation for youth Consider that there is an estimated 3.5 to 5 million youth – age 16 to 24- that are out of school and out of work. Yet, in 2007, only 108,418 youth exited WIA title I youth programs. Of those who exited only 27,681 were dropouts. Less than 10% of youth who exited went on to postsecondary education or advanced training. Only 5% of youth who were high school dropouts went on to postsecondary education or advanced training.

    Given the skill demands required for economic competitiveness, more than ever we need a robust youth service infrastructure in this country that will: 1)work in tandem with the secondary system to keep youth who are in high risk situations attached to school, 2) work in concert with other youth serving systems –i.e. Child welfare, juvenile justice – to coordinate transition support for vulnerable youth, 3) outreach to youth who have disengaged from education and labor market pursuits and facilitate their reconnection, and 4) convene workforce, public education, labor, employers, and CBO’s to craft pathways to postsecondary and labor market success. (author introduction)

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