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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Burke, Mike; Sims, Kate; Anderson, Signe; FirtzSimons, Crystal; Hewins, Jessie
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2013

    When the school year ends, millions of low-income children lose access to the school breakfasts and lunches they rely on during the school year. The federal Summer Nutrition Programs—the Summer Food Service Program (SFSP) and the National School Lunch Program (NSLP)—are designed to replace the regular school year programs, providing low-income children access to the nutritious meals they need to keep hunger at bay and remain healthy throughout the summer. The meals provided through the Summer Nutrition Programs also play an important role in drawing children into educational, enrichment, and recreational programming that keep them learning, engaged, active, safe, and moving during school vacation. (author abstract)

    When the school year ends, millions of low-income children lose access to the school breakfasts and lunches they rely on during the school year. The federal Summer Nutrition Programs—the Summer Food Service Program (SFSP) and the National School Lunch Program (NSLP)—are designed to replace the regular school year programs, providing low-income children access to the nutritious meals they need to keep hunger at bay and remain healthy throughout the summer. The meals provided through the Summer Nutrition Programs also play an important role in drawing children into educational, enrichment, and recreational programming that keep them learning, engaged, active, safe, and moving during school vacation. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Fantuzzo, John; LeBoeuf, Whitney; Brumley, Benjamin; Perlman, Staci
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2013

    Child homelessness and educational well-being is an area of national research that requires more precise investigation to address mixed findings. The aim of this study was to extend the investigation of the relations between homelessness and educational well-being by determining if timing and frequency of homeless episodes are differentially associated with children's academic and classroom engagement outcomes. This investigation used a comprehensive research model to study the effects of these homeless episode characteristics within a large urban student cohort. Additionally, this study accounted for co-occurring early risk factors. Findings indicated that having a first homeless episode in early childhood was associated with non-proficiency in mathematics and academic engagement problems. Also more frequent homeless episodes were related to truancy in third grade. These results stress the importance of early intervention for homeless children and underscore the need to further understand the variation in young children's homeless experiences. (author abstract)

    Child homelessness and educational well-being is an area of national research that requires more precise investigation to address mixed findings. The aim of this study was to extend the investigation of the relations between homelessness and educational well-being by determining if timing and frequency of homeless episodes are differentially associated with children's academic and classroom engagement outcomes. This investigation used a comprehensive research model to study the effects of these homeless episode characteristics within a large urban student cohort. Additionally, this study accounted for co-occurring early risk factors. Findings indicated that having a first homeless episode in early childhood was associated with non-proficiency in mathematics and academic engagement problems. Also more frequent homeless episodes were related to truancy in third grade. These results stress the importance of early intervention for homeless children and underscore the need to further understand the variation in young children's homeless experiences. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Aber, J. Lawrence; Grannis, Kerry Searle; Owen, Stephanie; Sawhill, Isabel V.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2013

    This study uses data from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Kindergarten Class of 1998-1999 (ECLS-K) to analyze competencies that children need to master by the end of elementary school, the extent to which they are doing so, what might be done to improve their performance, and how this might affect their ultimate ability to earn a living and their chances of being middle class by middle age. Both academic skills and socio-emotional skills contribute to core competency. We measure core competence at age eleven using five outcomes: math skills, reading skills, self-regulation, behavior problems, and physical health. (author introduction)

    This study uses data from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Kindergarten Class of 1998-1999 (ECLS-K) to analyze competencies that children need to master by the end of elementary school, the extent to which they are doing so, what might be done to improve their performance, and how this might affect their ultimate ability to earn a living and their chances of being middle class by middle age. Both academic skills and socio-emotional skills contribute to core competency. We measure core competence at age eleven using five outcomes: math skills, reading skills, self-regulation, behavior problems, and physical health. (author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Zill, Nicholas; Furstenberg, Frank Jr.; Peterson, James; Moore, Kristin
    Reference Type: Dataset
    Year: 1990

    Description: The National Survey of Children (NSC) was designed to assess the physical, social, and psychological well-being of American children, to develop a national profile of the way children in the United States live, to permit analysis of the relationships between the conditions of children's lives and measures of child development, and to examine the effects of marital disruption on the development of children and on the operation of single and multi-parent families. Information is provided on the child's well-being, family, experiences with family disruption, behavior, physical health, and mental health.

    Population: Children between the ages of seven and 11, or born between September 1, 1964 and December 31, 1969, living in households in the 48 contiguous states.

    Periodicity: Data collected and available for all three waves – 1976, 1981, 1987.

    Additional relevant topics covered in this dataset: Child development, fertility, family structure.

    (Information adapted from the...

    Description: The National Survey of Children (NSC) was designed to assess the physical, social, and psychological well-being of American children, to develop a national profile of the way children in the United States live, to permit analysis of the relationships between the conditions of children's lives and measures of child development, and to examine the effects of marital disruption on the development of children and on the operation of single and multi-parent families. Information is provided on the child's well-being, family, experiences with family disruption, behavior, physical health, and mental health.

    Population: Children between the ages of seven and 11, or born between September 1, 1964 and December 31, 1969, living in households in the 48 contiguous states.

    Periodicity: Data collected and available for all three waves – 1976, 1981, 1987.

    Additional relevant topics covered in this dataset: Child development, fertility, family structure.

    (Information adapted from the publisher)

    For more information, please see the Compendium of Family-Self Sufficiency Databases.

  • Individual Author: Magnuson, Katherine A.
    Reference Type: SSRC Products
    Year: 2012

    On December 6, 2012, the Self-Sufficiency Research Clearinghouse (SSRC) hosted the Early Care and Education: Self-Sufficiency Implications for Parents and Children Webinar featuring Dr. Katherine Magnuson. During the Webinar, Dr. Magnuson provided an overview of government-funded early education initiatives and discussed empirical evidence about the effectiveness of programs in promoting family economic self-sufficiency as well as school readiness. Policy and research recommendations for parents and children were also discussed.

    Dr. Magnuson was the first Emerging Scholar, and was featured from October-December 2012. Dr. Magnuson, an Associate Professor of Social Work at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

    An interactive question and answer session followed the formal presentation and this document provides a record of that dialogue. The recording from the Webinar as well as more information on Dr. Magnuson and her work can be found here. The transcript from Dr. Magnuson's Webinar can...

    On December 6, 2012, the Self-Sufficiency Research Clearinghouse (SSRC) hosted the Early Care and Education: Self-Sufficiency Implications for Parents and Children Webinar featuring Dr. Katherine Magnuson. During the Webinar, Dr. Magnuson provided an overview of government-funded early education initiatives and discussed empirical evidence about the effectiveness of programs in promoting family economic self-sufficiency as well as school readiness. Policy and research recommendations for parents and children were also discussed.

    Dr. Magnuson was the first Emerging Scholar, and was featured from October-December 2012. Dr. Magnuson, an Associate Professor of Social Work at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

    An interactive question and answer session followed the formal presentation and this document provides a record of that dialogue. The recording from the Webinar as well as more information on Dr. Magnuson and her work can be found here. The transcript from Dr. Magnuson's Webinar can be found here. Dr. Magnuson's PowerPoint from the Webinar can be found here.

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