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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: Edelman, Peter B.; Holzer, Harry J.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2013

    In this paper we will briefly review recent trends in employment outcomes for disadvantaged youth, focusing specifically on those who have become "disconnected" from school and the labor market, and why these trends have occurred. We then review a range of policy prescriptions that might improve those outcomes. These policies include: 1) Efforts to enhance education and employment outcomes, both among in-school youth who are at risk of dropping out and becoming disconnected as well as out-of-school youth who have already done so; 2) Policies to increase earnings and incent more labor force participation among youth, such as expanding the eligibility of childless adults (and especially non-custodial parents) for the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC); and 3) Specific policies to reduce barriers to employment faced by ex-offenders and non-custodial parents (NCPs). We also consider policies that target the demand side of the labor market, in efforts to spur the willingness of employers to hire these young people and perhaps to improve the quality of jobs available to them.  (author...

    In this paper we will briefly review recent trends in employment outcomes for disadvantaged youth, focusing specifically on those who have become "disconnected" from school and the labor market, and why these trends have occurred. We then review a range of policy prescriptions that might improve those outcomes. These policies include: 1) Efforts to enhance education and employment outcomes, both among in-school youth who are at risk of dropping out and becoming disconnected as well as out-of-school youth who have already done so; 2) Policies to increase earnings and incent more labor force participation among youth, such as expanding the eligibility of childless adults (and especially non-custodial parents) for the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC); and 3) Specific policies to reduce barriers to employment faced by ex-offenders and non-custodial parents (NCPs). We also consider policies that target the demand side of the labor market, in efforts to spur the willingness of employers to hire these young people and perhaps to improve the quality of jobs available to them.  (author abstract)

    Also published as IRP Discussion Paper 1412-13.

  • Individual Author: Saunders, Correne; Kolupanowich, Nick; Born, Catherine
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2012

    This report is the first in a series that describes various aspects of the RISE initiative (Reaching Independence and Stability through Employment) and the persons placed in a work activity in the RISE era. Specifically, this report presents a foundational overview of a sample of more than 10,000 individuals who began an organized work activity between January 2009 and June 2010. (author abstract)

    This report is the first in a series that describes various aspects of the RISE initiative (Reaching Independence and Stability through Employment) and the persons placed in a work activity in the RISE era. Specifically, this report presents a foundational overview of a sample of more than 10,000 individuals who began an organized work activity between January 2009 and June 2010. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Hall, Lauren; Kim, Hae Jung; Passarella, Letitia; Born, Catherine
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2012

    Federal law as well as Maryland law requires a quadrennial, case-level review of the application of quantitative child support guidelines when establishing or modifying support obligations. These reviews are meant to identify areas of policy or practice where enhancements might be needed. Most importantly, these reviews are intended to evaluate if the financial needs of children are being impartially and equitably addressed through consistent application of the guidelines. Child support is an important income source, perhaps especially for low-income families where its receipt can add as much as 20 percent to the income of single parents (Nicoli, Logan, Born, 2012). The significance of child support to the larger population and to local economies is evident from the fact that $26.5 billion in child support was collected nationally and distributed on behalf of more than 17 million children in 2010.

    Members of the Maryland General Assembly are well aware of the importance of child support in the lives of their constituents. They also understand the importance of the public...

    Federal law as well as Maryland law requires a quadrennial, case-level review of the application of quantitative child support guidelines when establishing or modifying support obligations. These reviews are meant to identify areas of policy or practice where enhancements might be needed. Most importantly, these reviews are intended to evaluate if the financial needs of children are being impartially and equitably addressed through consistent application of the guidelines. Child support is an important income source, perhaps especially for low-income families where its receipt can add as much as 20 percent to the income of single parents (Nicoli, Logan, Born, 2012). The significance of child support to the larger population and to local economies is evident from the fact that $26.5 billion in child support was collected nationally and distributed on behalf of more than 17 million children in 2010.

    Members of the Maryland General Assembly are well aware of the importance of child support in the lives of their constituents. They also understand the importance of the public child support program operated by the Child Support Enforcement Administration (CSEA) of the Department of Human Resources (DHR) in partnership with local child support programs, the judiciary, and local Departments of Social Services. Due to the legislature’s long-standing interest in the public child support program, it requires that a written report be submitted to it describing the methodology and findings of the mandatory, periodic case review projects.

    This report is in fulfillment of the required 2012 quadrennial legislative report. The report covers the calendar years of 2007 through 2010. The research described herein was carried out by the Family Welfare Research and Training Group at the University of Maryland, School of Social Work on behalf of CSEA-DHR, as have been all prior quadrennial reviews. Report findings are based on the review of court orders and their associated guidelines worksheets for a stratified, random sample of 5,340 Maryland child support cases with new or modified support orders between January 1, 2007 and December 31, 2010. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Ratliff, Pamela P.
    Reference Type: Thesis
    Year: 2012

    The purpose of this study was to investigate (a) non-custodial, low-income fathers' level of knowledge of child support enforcement policy, procedures, and rules; (b) their level of involvement in the family court system; and (c) the relationship between non-custodial, low-income fathers' knowledge of the procedures of the child support enforcement system and compliance with court child support orders. The investigation employed a descriptive-survey research design. The sample (n = 25) was randomly selected from a population of noncustodial, low-income fathers enrolled in a welfare-to-work training project in South Carolina. Data were collected from the sample using a valid and reliable survey titled Knowledge of Child Support Enforcement Policy and Procedures or KCSEPP. Data were analyzed to respond to seven quantitative research questions. The data showed that the level of knowledge fathers had about child support policies and procedures was generally low; and their level of involvement in the family court system, due to non-compliance with child support orders, revealed a high...

    The purpose of this study was to investigate (a) non-custodial, low-income fathers' level of knowledge of child support enforcement policy, procedures, and rules; (b) their level of involvement in the family court system; and (c) the relationship between non-custodial, low-income fathers' knowledge of the procedures of the child support enforcement system and compliance with court child support orders. The investigation employed a descriptive-survey research design. The sample (n = 25) was randomly selected from a population of noncustodial, low-income fathers enrolled in a welfare-to-work training project in South Carolina. Data were collected from the sample using a valid and reliable survey titled Knowledge of Child Support Enforcement Policy and Procedures or KCSEPP. Data were analyzed to respond to seven quantitative research questions. The data showed that the level of knowledge fathers had about child support policies and procedures was generally low; and their level of involvement in the family court system, due to non-compliance with child support orders, revealed a high degree of negative involvement. Results also revealed that there was no difference in the level of knowledge of child support enforcement policy and procedures for fathers who were in compliance with child support orders and those who were not in compliance. Ultimately, the study confirmed that educating fathers about child support policy and procedures is a strategy that should be explored further for its usefulness in informing non-custodial, low-income fathers' decision making regarding legal and financial obligations to their children. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Craigie, Terry-Ann
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2010

    When parents engage in childbearing with more than one partner or multi-partnered fertility, this gives rise to a complex family system with strong implications for transfers to children. This study therefore seeks to measure the effect of multi-partnered fertility on formal and informal child support transfers, specifically to non-marital children. Using data from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study (FFCWS), the study goes beyond previous works by isolating causal effects of male and female multi-partnered fertility as well as highlighting sample selection bias induced by mothers non-randomly selecting into formal and informal child support arrangements. I find that in general, the probability of receiving formal and/or informal child support contributions decline as the number of children a parent has with more than one partner rises. However, the study only confirms a causal adverse relationship for multi-partnered fathers. Using the endogenous switching regression to correct for sample selection bias, the model illustrates that mothers with formal...

    When parents engage in childbearing with more than one partner or multi-partnered fertility, this gives rise to a complex family system with strong implications for transfers to children. This study therefore seeks to measure the effect of multi-partnered fertility on formal and informal child support transfers, specifically to non-marital children. Using data from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study (FFCWS), the study goes beyond previous works by isolating causal effects of male and female multi-partnered fertility as well as highlighting sample selection bias induced by mothers non-randomly selecting into formal and informal child support arrangements. I find that in general, the probability of receiving formal and/or informal child support contributions decline as the number of children a parent has with more than one partner rises. However, the study only confirms a causal adverse relationship for multi-partnered fathers. Using the endogenous switching regression to correct for sample selection bias, the model illustrates that mothers with formal child support agreements receive higher transfers than other mothers would have, had they acquired formal child support orders. Hence, mothers select the type of child support arrangement for which they comparative advantage. These findings underscore the need to revisit child support policies for complex families. (author abstract)

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