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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Ziol-Guest, Kathleen M.; McKenna, Claire C.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2013

    This study assesses the consequences of housing instability during the first 5 years of a child's life for a host of school readiness outcomes. Using data from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study (n = 2,810), this study examines the relation between multiple moves and children's language and literacy and behavior problems at age 5. The moderating role of poverty is further tested in this relation. The findings show that moving three or more times in a child's first 5 years is significantly associated with increases in attention problems, and internalizing and externalizing behavior, but only among poor children. (author abstract)

    This study assesses the consequences of housing instability during the first 5 years of a child's life for a host of school readiness outcomes. Using data from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study (n = 2,810), this study examines the relation between multiple moves and children's language and literacy and behavior problems at age 5. The moderating role of poverty is further tested in this relation. The findings show that moving three or more times in a child's first 5 years is significantly associated with increases in attention problems, and internalizing and externalizing behavior, but only among poor children. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Cenegy, Laura Freeman; Brewer, Mackenzie
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2013

    This paper reviews the research of the past two decades that addresses the relationship between family structure and early child health outcomes. Specifically, we focus on family structure’s influence on child health during pregnancy, birth, and infancy. We briefly summarize the most pervasive changes to family structure in the US during recent decades and discuss how early child health is linked to future outcomes for children and adults. We review research that highlights the mechanisms linking family structure to early child health and identify key risk and protective factors for children from the prenatal period through infancy. We conclude with a critical assessment of current policy efforts to strengthen families and make recommendations for how best to address this issue for America’s families going forward. (author abstract)

    This paper reviews the research of the past two decades that addresses the relationship between family structure and early child health outcomes. Specifically, we focus on family structure’s influence on child health during pregnancy, birth, and infancy. We briefly summarize the most pervasive changes to family structure in the US during recent decades and discuss how early child health is linked to future outcomes for children and adults. We review research that highlights the mechanisms linking family structure to early child health and identify key risk and protective factors for children from the prenatal period through infancy. We conclude with a critical assessment of current policy efforts to strengthen families and make recommendations for how best to address this issue for America’s families going forward. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Kreider, Brent; Pepper, John V.; Roy, Manan
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2012

    The Women, Infants, and Children Program (WIC) is considered a crucial component of the social safety net in the United States, yet there is limited supporting evidence on the effects of WIC on the nutritional well-being and food security of infants and young children. Two key identification problems have been especially difficult to address. First, the decision to take up WIC is endogenous as households are not randomly assigned to the program; recipients are likely to differ from nonrecipients in unobserved ways (e.g., prior health) that are related to associated outcomes. Second, survey respondents often fail to report receiving public assistance, and the existing literature has uncovered substantial degrees of systematic misclassification of WIC participation. Using data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), we apply recently developed partial identification methodologies to jointly account for these two identification problems in a single framework. Under relatively weak assumptions, we find that WIC reduces the prevalence of child food...

    The Women, Infants, and Children Program (WIC) is considered a crucial component of the social safety net in the United States, yet there is limited supporting evidence on the effects of WIC on the nutritional well-being and food security of infants and young children. Two key identification problems have been especially difficult to address. First, the decision to take up WIC is endogenous as households are not randomly assigned to the program; recipients are likely to differ from nonrecipients in unobserved ways (e.g., prior health) that are related to associated outcomes. Second, survey respondents often fail to report receiving public assistance, and the existing literature has uncovered substantial degrees of systematic misclassification of WIC participation. Using data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), we apply recently developed partial identification methodologies to jointly account for these two identification problems in a single framework. Under relatively weak assumptions, we find that WIC reduces the prevalence of child food insecurity by at least 5.5 percentage points and very low food security by at least 1.5 percentage points. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Paulsell, Diane
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2001

    Discussion about the extent to which the government could and should invest in the child care market has increased among policymakers. This report summarizes a conference convened by ASPE to engage a multidisciplinary group of economists, developmental psychologists, child care researchers, and policy analysts in a dialogue about the rationale for public investment in quality child care. (author abstract)

    Discussion about the extent to which the government could and should invest in the child care market has increased among policymakers. This report summarizes a conference convened by ASPE to engage a multidisciplinary group of economists, developmental psychologists, child care researchers, and policy analysts in a dialogue about the rationale for public investment in quality child care. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Paulsell, Diane; Cohen, Julie; Stieglitz, Ali; Lurie-Hurvitz, Erica; Fenichel, Emily; Kisker, Ellen
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2002

    Describes promising strategies for building community collaborations and partnerships, as well as preliminary themes that may be helpful for programs, communities, and policymakers interested in developing, implementing, and supporting child care partnerships. Focusing on Early Head Start, the authors note that many partnerships have succeeded in expanding access and improving quality, although challenges remain, especially when state licensing requirements differ from partners' performance standards. Achieving and maintaining continuity of care has also been challenging. (author abstract)

    Describes promising strategies for building community collaborations and partnerships, as well as preliminary themes that may be helpful for programs, communities, and policymakers interested in developing, implementing, and supporting child care partnerships. Focusing on Early Head Start, the authors note that many partnerships have succeeded in expanding access and improving quality, although challenges remain, especially when state licensing requirements differ from partners' performance standards. Achieving and maintaining continuity of care has also been challenging. (author abstract)

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