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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Adams, Gina; McDaniel, Marla
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2012

    Smaller immigrant communities can face barriers to participating in prekindergarten programs, in particular lack of knowledge about the program, language barriers and enrollment logistics. Community-based organizations working with these communities can support outreach efforts and play a role in overcoming all of these barriers. This study presents findings from focus groups of a number of community-based organizations working with smaller immigrant populations in the Chicago metro area, and identifies a number of strategies that could be employed to support prekindergarten participation among immigrant families. (author abstract)

    Smaller immigrant communities can face barriers to participating in prekindergarten programs, in particular lack of knowledge about the program, language barriers and enrollment logistics. Community-based organizations working with these communities can support outreach efforts and play a role in overcoming all of these barriers. This study presents findings from focus groups of a number of community-based organizations working with smaller immigrant populations in the Chicago metro area, and identifies a number of strategies that could be employed to support prekindergarten participation among immigrant families. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Adams, Gina; McDaniel, Marla
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2012

    A key measure of success of state prekindergarten initiatives is their ability to reach and serve children who are likely to face challenges in school. This study adds to our understanding of the challenges faced by immigrant children and families in Chicago, Illinois, by focusing on the extent to which families from smaller immigrant communities - particularly Pakistani, Nigerian, Vietnamese, Polish, and Haitian families-face barriers in accessing the Illinois prekindergarten program. Based on focus groups with parents and interviews with prekindergarten providers, this study finds a number of barriers, including lack of knowledge, language barriers, and logistical challenges around enrollment. (author abstract)

    A key measure of success of state prekindergarten initiatives is their ability to reach and serve children who are likely to face challenges in school. This study adds to our understanding of the challenges faced by immigrant children and families in Chicago, Illinois, by focusing on the extent to which families from smaller immigrant communities - particularly Pakistani, Nigerian, Vietnamese, Polish, and Haitian families-face barriers in accessing the Illinois prekindergarten program. Based on focus groups with parents and interviews with prekindergarten providers, this study finds a number of barriers, including lack of knowledge, language barriers, and logistical challenges around enrollment. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation (ASPE)
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2010

    The Hispanic Healthy Marriage Initiative is a focused strategy to address the unique cultural, linguistic, demographic, and socioeconomic needs of a growing population of Hispanic children and families in the United States.

    The Administration for Children and Families (ACF) and the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation (ASPE), within the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), funded the Hispanic Healthy Marriage Initiative (HHMI) Grantee Implementation Evaluation to learn how relationship and marriage education programs serving primarily Hispanic individuals and couples are marketing services and developing culturally appropriate materials and programming for diverse Hispanic populations. This study represents an implementation evaluation, not an impact evaluation.

     *OPRE managed, funded by ASPE.

    The Hispanic Healthy Marriage Initiative is a focused strategy to address the unique cultural, linguistic, demographic, and socioeconomic needs of a growing population of Hispanic children and families in the United States.

    The Administration for Children and Families (ACF) and the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation (ASPE), within the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), funded the Hispanic Healthy Marriage Initiative (HHMI) Grantee Implementation Evaluation to learn how relationship and marriage education programs serving primarily Hispanic individuals and couples are marketing services and developing culturally appropriate materials and programming for diverse Hispanic populations. This study represents an implementation evaluation, not an impact evaluation.

     *OPRE managed, funded by ASPE.

  • Individual Author: Roth, Benjamin J.; Gonzales, Roberto G.; Lesniewski, Jacob
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2015

    Just as more poor people in America now live in suburbs than in primary cities, immigrants are more likely to live in suburbs than in the urban core. This study examines the nonprofit safety net in select Chicago suburban municipalities to assess the capacity and accessibility of these service providers relative to the location and need of low-income immigrants. We identify differences between immigrant service providers and mainstream organizations, particularly their willingness and ability to reach out to and serve immigrants and to analyze their role as mediating institutions. (Author abstract)

    Just as more poor people in America now live in suburbs than in primary cities, immigrants are more likely to live in suburbs than in the urban core. This study examines the nonprofit safety net in select Chicago suburban municipalities to assess the capacity and accessibility of these service providers relative to the location and need of low-income immigrants. We identify differences between immigrant service providers and mainstream organizations, particularly their willingness and ability to reach out to and serve immigrants and to analyze their role as mediating institutions. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Cifuentes, Mauricio
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2004

    The author, a novice social worker at a program for Mexican immigrants in Chicago, describes the needs of his clients through personal anecdotes. Through these anecdotes, he shows how multiple, interconnected problems keep his clients from reaching their potential. He also describes his clients’ strength and resilience in the face of their challenges, and how his organization (Programa C.I.E.L.O) helps them by addressing multiple barriers.

    The author, a novice social worker at a program for Mexican immigrants in Chicago, describes the needs of his clients through personal anecdotes. Through these anecdotes, he shows how multiple, interconnected problems keep his clients from reaching their potential. He also describes his clients’ strength and resilience in the face of their challenges, and how his organization (Programa C.I.E.L.O) helps them by addressing multiple barriers.

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