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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: Bose, Pablo Shiladitya
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2013

    The theory and practice of sustainability involve engaging a delicate balance between often competing interests, usually defined in terms of the ecological, economic, and social arenas. The complexities apparent in balancing such tensions become especially evident if we consider transportation equity, specifically in the context of urban planning and managing both population growth and demographic change. This paper examines issues of access, transportation, and sustainability – in its myriad forms – for refugees settling in Vermont. With relatively homogenous populations and a lack of resettlement services common to many traditional immigrant destinations, small towns in Vermont present a particular challenge for refugees arriving from diverse locations in Africa, Asia, and the Middle East. Drawing on the extant literature regarding sustainable transportation, spatial mismatch, accessibility, and environmental justice, this paper details the results of a community-based project using surveys and key informant interviews in order to explore the transportation...

    The theory and practice of sustainability involve engaging a delicate balance between often competing interests, usually defined in terms of the ecological, economic, and social arenas. The complexities apparent in balancing such tensions become especially evident if we consider transportation equity, specifically in the context of urban planning and managing both population growth and demographic change. This paper examines issues of access, transportation, and sustainability – in its myriad forms – for refugees settling in Vermont. With relatively homogenous populations and a lack of resettlement services common to many traditional immigrant destinations, small towns in Vermont present a particular challenge for refugees arriving from diverse locations in Africa, Asia, and the Middle East. Drawing on the extant literature regarding sustainable transportation, spatial mismatch, accessibility, and environmental justice, this paper details the results of a community-based project using surveys and key informant interviews in order to explore the transportation experiences and challenges faced by refugees in Vermont. In particular, the paper looks at gaps that refugees have identified in existing infrastructure as well as modes and hierarchies of transportation choice. Additionally, the paper examines the attempt to include refugee perspectives in regional transportation planning initiatives, including one county's federally supported sustainable communities plan. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Painter, Gary; Yu, Zhou
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2012

    Research has documented that immigrants have moved in large numbers to almost every metropolitan area and select rural areas in the country (e.g., Lichter and Johnson 2009; Painter and Yu 2010). In the midst of these demographic shifts, the country has experienced a profound recession. To date, there has been little research on the impact of the recession on immigrants across the country. Using the 2006 and 2009 American Community Survey microdata, we assess how the recent economic crisis has affected immigrants with respect to three housing outcomes (residential mobility, homeownership, and household formation) to compare housing outcomes at two important time points in the recent economic cycle. The results suggest the early impact of the recession has not been as severe on immigrants as one might expect. In particular, the places where immigrant populations are newest have not experienced reductions in homeownership as those in the large immigrant gateways. Even in the established gateways, the decline in homeownership has been smaller for immigrants than for native-born...

    Research has documented that immigrants have moved in large numbers to almost every metropolitan area and select rural areas in the country (e.g., Lichter and Johnson 2009; Painter and Yu 2010). In the midst of these demographic shifts, the country has experienced a profound recession. To date, there has been little research on the impact of the recession on immigrants across the country. Using the 2006 and 2009 American Community Survey microdata, we assess how the recent economic crisis has affected immigrants with respect to three housing outcomes (residential mobility, homeownership, and household formation) to compare housing outcomes at two important time points in the recent economic cycle. The results suggest the early impact of the recession has not been as severe on immigrants as one might expect. In particular, the places where immigrant populations are newest have not experienced reductions in homeownership as those in the large immigrant gateways. Even in the established gateways, the decline in homeownership has been smaller for immigrants than for native-born households. Regression results suggest that the negative impacts from the recession are strongest in the gateway metropolitan areas, and that after controlling for residence in the hardest hit areas, changes in unemployment rates and increases in metropolitan level default rates have a negative impact on homeownership rates. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Lieberman, Charles J.; Lindler, Vanessa; O’Brien-Strain, Margaret
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2002

    Child-only cases represent about 40 percent of California’s TANF caseload. In counties that have experienced especially high caseload reductions, such as San Mateo and Santa Clara Counties in the San Francisco Bay Area, child-only cases represent half or more of the total CalWORKs (California TANF program) caseload. The citizen children of undocumented parents make up as many as 40 percent of the child-only caseload. These families are very similar to aided adult families, in that there are needy parents in the household who are able to work but currently do not earn enough to support their families. Yet because the parents are barred from receiving assistance, these families rely on lower grants and are not able to access the services available to other families. This report explores the characteristics and well-being of such undocumented immigrant child-only cases in San Mateo and Santa Clara Counties. Building on previous work on TANF leavers in these counties, The SPHERE Institute surveyed the parents of almost 800 citizen children who were currently and formerly aided on...

    Child-only cases represent about 40 percent of California’s TANF caseload. In counties that have experienced especially high caseload reductions, such as San Mateo and Santa Clara Counties in the San Francisco Bay Area, child-only cases represent half or more of the total CalWORKs (California TANF program) caseload. The citizen children of undocumented parents make up as many as 40 percent of the child-only caseload. These families are very similar to aided adult families, in that there are needy parents in the household who are able to work but currently do not earn enough to support their families. Yet because the parents are barred from receiving assistance, these families rely on lower grants and are not able to access the services available to other families. This report explores the characteristics and well-being of such undocumented immigrant child-only cases in San Mateo and Santa Clara Counties. Building on previous work on TANF leavers in these counties, The SPHERE Institute surveyed the parents of almost 800 citizen children who were currently and formerly aided on child-only CalWORKs cases. Comparing these findings to results from an earlier study of aided-adult leavers (citizens or legal immigrants), we review the demographic characteristics, the employment status, the economic circumstances and other measures of well-being for both the child-only and aided-adult cases. Finally, we assess which characteristics appear to be associated with exiting the child-only caseload for these families. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Greenberg, Mark ; Haskins, Ron ; Fremstad, Shawn
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2004

    Policymakers and analysts agree on the need to improve the well-being of children in immigrant families in the United States—for example, in the areas of public benefits, education, and economic mobility—but disagree about how to address the problems. The authors of this policy brief are no exception. Ron Haskins, Senior Fellow at the Brookings Institution and Senior Editor of The Future of Children, seconds the decision of Congress in the 1996 welfare reform law to make noncitizens ineligible for public assistance and Medicaid. He emphasizes the need to tie public benefits for immigrant families to work through such policies as education and training and the earned income tax credit for families with children. Mark Greenberg, Director of Policy at the Center for Law and Social Policy, and Shawn Fremstad, Deputy Director of the Welfare and Income Support Division at the Center for Budget and Policy Priorities, argue that noncitizen families should have the same eligibility for public assistance as citizen families and support greater financial aid for early childhood education...

    Policymakers and analysts agree on the need to improve the well-being of children in immigrant families in the United States—for example, in the areas of public benefits, education, and economic mobility—but disagree about how to address the problems. The authors of this policy brief are no exception. Ron Haskins, Senior Fellow at the Brookings Institution and Senior Editor of The Future of Children, seconds the decision of Congress in the 1996 welfare reform law to make noncitizens ineligible for public assistance and Medicaid. He emphasizes the need to tie public benefits for immigrant families to work through such policies as education and training and the earned income tax credit for families with children. Mark Greenberg, Director of Policy at the Center for Law and Social Policy, and Shawn Fremstad, Deputy Director of the Welfare and Income Support Division at the Center for Budget and Policy Priorities, argue that noncitizen families should have the same eligibility for public assistance as citizen families and support greater financial aid for early childhood education and other forms of schooling. The hope of all three authors, however, is that researchers and public officials will continue to search for common ground to improve life for children of immigrant families, most of whom will grow up as Americans. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Andrews, Nancy; Erickson, David
    Reference Type: Book Chapter/Book
    Year: 2012

    One in six Americans now lives in poverty — the highest level in half a century. Poverty has spread beyond cities to suburbs and rural communities and is being transferred from one generation to the next. At the same time, we know more about what it takes to build vibrant communities and to help people lead healthy, productive lives. We also know that expanding access to affordable housing, good schools, transportation, jobs, and even supermarkets and parks, can mean better health and life outcomes for people and revitalize whole communities.

    Investing in What Works for America’s Communities is a new book that calls on leaders from the public, private, and nonprofit sectors to build on what we know is working to move the needle on poverty. The book’s impressive list of authors represents a broad range of sectors including federal agencies, philanthropy, housing academia, health, and the private sector. This collection of essays provides dozens of innovative ideas that can bring new opportunities to America’s struggling communities. It calls on leaders, from the...

    One in six Americans now lives in poverty — the highest level in half a century. Poverty has spread beyond cities to suburbs and rural communities and is being transferred from one generation to the next. At the same time, we know more about what it takes to build vibrant communities and to help people lead healthy, productive lives. We also know that expanding access to affordable housing, good schools, transportation, jobs, and even supermarkets and parks, can mean better health and life outcomes for people and revitalize whole communities.

    Investing in What Works for America’s Communities is a new book that calls on leaders from the public, private, and nonprofit sectors to build on what we know is working to move the needle on poverty. The book’s impressive list of authors represents a broad range of sectors including federal agencies, philanthropy, housing academia, health, and the private sector. This collection of essays provides dozens of innovative ideas that can bring new opportunities to America’s struggling communities. It calls on leaders, from the public, private, and nonprofit sectors to recognize that they can work smarter and achieve more by working together.

    Table of Contents:

    ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

    FOREWORD : Building Sustainable Communities, Elizabeth A. Duke, Governor, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System

    I COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT: PAST AND PRESENT

    • The Past, Present, and Future of Community Development in the United States, Alexander von Hoffman, Harvard University
    • The Continuing Evolution of American Poverty and Its Implications for Community Development, Alan Berube, Brookings Institution
    • Crossing Over to an Improved Era of Community Development, Eric Belsky, Harvard University and Jennifer Fauth, City of New York

    II OPEN FORUM: VOICES AND OPINIONS FROM LEADERS IN POLICY, THE FIELD, AND ACADEMIA

    FROM LEADERS IN POLICY

    • Fighting Poverty through Community Development, Shaun Donovan, U.S. Secretary of Housing and Urban Development; Arne Duncan, U.S. Secretary of Education; and, Kathleen Sebelius, U.S. Secretary of Health and Human Services

    FROM LEADERS IN THE FIELD

    • America’s Tomorrow: Race, Place, and the Equity Agenda, Angela Glover Blackwell, PolicyLink
    • People Transforming Communities. For Good., Angela Blanchard, Neighborhood Centers, Inc.
    • Future of Community Development: How CDFIs Can Best Ride the Impact Investing Wave, Antony Bugg-Levine, Nonprofit Finance Fund
    • Community Development in Rural America: Collaborative, Regional, and Comprehensive, Cynthia M. Duncan, AGree
    • It Takes a Neighborhood: Purpose Built Communities and Neighborhood Transformation, Shirley Franklin, Purpose Built Communities and David Edwards, IBM Corporation
    • The Future of Community Development, Paul Grogan, The Boston Foundation
    • From Community to Prosperity, Ben Hecht, Living Cities
    • Owning Your Own Job Is a Beautiful Thing: Community Wealth Building in Cleveland, Ohio, Ted Howard, Democracy Collaborative
    • Why Health, Poverty, and Community Development Are Inseparable, Risa Lavizzo-Mourey, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation
    • The World Has Changed and So Must We, Clara Miller, F. B. Heron Foundation
    • Getting to Scale: The Need for a New Model in Housing and Community Development, Sister Lillian Murphy, Mercy Housing and Janet Falk, Mercy Housing
    • What Problem Are We Trying to Solve?, Mark A. Pinsky, Opportunity Finance Network
    • Transit-Oriented Development Is Good Community Development, John Robert Smith, Reconnecting America and Allison Brooks, Reconnecting America
    • Household and Community Financial Stability: Essential and Interconnected, Jennifer Tescher, Center for Financial Services Innovation

    FROM LEADERS IN ACADEMIA

    • Assessing Health Effects of Community Development, Nancy E. Adler, University of California, San Francisco
    • Deep Democracy Is Not Meetings That Last Forever: Community Development Next, Xavier de Souza Briggs, Massachusetts Institute of Technology  and J. Phillip Thompson, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
    • Rules, Not Resources, Mark Calabria, Cato Institute
    • Our History with Concentrated Poverty, Peter Edelman, Georgetown University Law Center
    • Crime and Community Development, Ingrid Gould Ellen, New York University
    • Early Childhood Development: Creating Healthy Communities with Greater Efficiency and Effectiveness, Gabriella Conti, University of Chicago and James J. Heckman, University of Chicago
    • Mobilizing Science to Reduce Intergenerational Poverty, James M. Radner, University of Toronto and Jack P. Shonkoff, Harvard University

    III MAPPING THE FUTURE: SYNTHESIZING THEMES AND

    IDEAS FOR NEXT STEPS

    • Integration and Innovation in a Time of Stress: Doing the Best for People and Place, Ellen Seidman, Visiting Scholar at the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco
    • Routinizing the Extraordinary, David Erickson, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco; Ian Galloway, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco; and, Naomi Cytron, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco
    • Inflection Point: New Vision, New Strategy, New Organization, Nancy O. Andrews, Low Income Investment Fund  and Nicolas Retsinas, Harvard Business School

    (author abstract)

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