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SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: American Academy of Pediatrics
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2013

    Child health and housing security are closely intertwined, and children without homes are more likely to suffer from chronic disease, hunger, and malnutrition than are children with homes. Homeless children and youth often have significant psychosocial development issues, and their education is frequently interrupted. Given the overall effects that homelessness can have on a child’s health and potential, it is important for pediatricians to recognize the factors that lead to homelessness, understand the ways that homelessness and its causes can lead to poor health outcomes, and when possible, help children and families mitigate some of the effects of homelessness. Through practice change, partnership with community resources, awareness, and advocacy, pediatricians can help optimize the health and well-being of children affected by homelessness. (author abstract)

    Child health and housing security are closely intertwined, and children without homes are more likely to suffer from chronic disease, hunger, and malnutrition than are children with homes. Homeless children and youth often have significant psychosocial development issues, and their education is frequently interrupted. Given the overall effects that homelessness can have on a child’s health and potential, it is important for pediatricians to recognize the factors that lead to homelessness, understand the ways that homelessness and its causes can lead to poor health outcomes, and when possible, help children and families mitigate some of the effects of homelessness. Through practice change, partnership with community resources, awareness, and advocacy, pediatricians can help optimize the health and well-being of children affected by homelessness. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Institute for Children, Poverty, and Homelessness
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2013

    Rapid rehousing or "housing first" has been heralded as the answer to ending family homelessness. New York City has the longest history with using rapid rehousing as a tool for placing homeless families into permanent housing. In this opinion brief, ICPH President and CEO Ralph Nunez points to New York City as a case study and takes a critical look at the long-term impact of federally driven rapid-rehousing policies. The brief raises fundamental questions about the effectiveness of rapid rehousing as a solution when it is used in a one-size-fits all manner.(author abstract)

    Rapid rehousing or "housing first" has been heralded as the answer to ending family homelessness. New York City has the longest history with using rapid rehousing as a tool for placing homeless families into permanent housing. In this opinion brief, ICPH President and CEO Ralph Nunez points to New York City as a case study and takes a critical look at the long-term impact of federally driven rapid-rehousing policies. The brief raises fundamental questions about the effectiveness of rapid rehousing as a solution when it is used in a one-size-fits all manner.(author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Institute for Children, Poverty, and Homelessness
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2015

    More than two decades ago, the Institute for Children, Poverty, and Homelessness (ICPH) was founded to explore the impact of homelessness on families, and especially children, in New York City. Since then, the scope of ICPH’s mission has expanded from one city to the entire United States. What began in 1998 as a report on homelessness in ten cities around the country has led to this publication, The American Almanac of Family Homelessness, exploring the issue across all 50 states.

    This Almanac is the result of three years of intensive review and evaluation, resulting in a comprehensive resource that presents data, policy analysis, and model programs and policies at the national, state, and local levels. It examines not only what we know about family homelessness, but also what we do not know, in order to both encourage the greater use of evidence-based practices and improve data collection.

    The causes of homelessness are varied and complex, and its effects on children and their parents can be devastating. Fortunately, there are a variety of service models and...

    More than two decades ago, the Institute for Children, Poverty, and Homelessness (ICPH) was founded to explore the impact of homelessness on families, and especially children, in New York City. Since then, the scope of ICPH’s mission has expanded from one city to the entire United States. What began in 1998 as a report on homelessness in ten cities around the country has led to this publication, The American Almanac of Family Homelessness, exploring the issue across all 50 states.

    This Almanac is the result of three years of intensive review and evaluation, resulting in a comprehensive resource that presents data, policy analysis, and model programs and policies at the national, state, and local levels. It examines not only what we know about family homelessness, but also what we do not know, in order to both encourage the greater use of evidence-based practices and improve data collection.

    The causes of homelessness are varied and complex, and its effects on children and their parents can be devastating. Fortunately, there are a variety of service models and housing solutions being utilized around the country to not only prevent the occurrence of homelessness, but also mitigate its impact. Unfortunately, we continue to struggle to link each family to the services that best fit its needs. The purpose of this publication is to present relevant information and analysis that will help providers, policymakers, and researchers to serve families most effectively.

    Homeless families have many champions across the country. We would like to take this opportunity to thank the countless providers, government officials, and advocates who aided us over the course of our research. Throughout the Almanac, we have utilized data and insight from state and local stakeholders to supplement publicly available federal sources and documents. Their assistance was essential to understanding the ways in which the needs and challenges of homeless families differ by locality and how providers can successfully tailor programs to their unique environments.

    We hope that you will find the Almanac a useful tool in whatever capacity you serve homeless families with children. Together, we can make sure that every child has a safe, stable home and a path to a brighter future. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Institute for Children, Poverty, & Homelessness
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2013

    Foreclosure and homelessness are linked in the public’s mind. But as shown in “Foreclosures and Homelessness: Understanding the Connection," the latest brief from ICPH, the lack of data collection means that the effects of foreclosures on homelessness are still inconclusive. This ICPH policy brief looks at foreclosures and homelessness in the United States from 2005 to 2011, and provides recommendations to government agencies and researchers for how to better track the number of homeless people who have experienced foreclosure. (author abstract)

    Foreclosure and homelessness are linked in the public’s mind. But as shown in “Foreclosures and Homelessness: Understanding the Connection," the latest brief from ICPH, the lack of data collection means that the effects of foreclosures on homelessness are still inconclusive. This ICPH policy brief looks at foreclosures and homelessness in the United States from 2005 to 2011, and provides recommendations to government agencies and researchers for how to better track the number of homeless people who have experienced foreclosure. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: de Bradley, Ann M. Aviles
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2011

    School districts are faced with the challenge of how best to serve the needs of a growing homeless student population. As the numbers of homeless children and youth continue to rise, it is imperative for educators and others to understand the experiences of unaccompanied homeless youth. A qualitative research project was undertaken to obtain the perspectives of six high school students experiencing homelessness. These perspectives illuminate the various and multiple factors intersecting with student's educational lives. Their narratives uncovered the following themes: (a) Homelessness as a misnomer, (b) Homelessness is not a choice, (c) Caring adults, and (d) Student agency. Their counternarratives challenge adults working with unaccompanied homeless youth to rethink and reimagine the manner in which homelessness is understood and framed; this is especially critical in educational spaces. Schools often are the primary contexts in which youth spend their time and can be instrumental to providing youth experiencing homelessness with the support and resources they identify as being...

    School districts are faced with the challenge of how best to serve the needs of a growing homeless student population. As the numbers of homeless children and youth continue to rise, it is imperative for educators and others to understand the experiences of unaccompanied homeless youth. A qualitative research project was undertaken to obtain the perspectives of six high school students experiencing homelessness. These perspectives illuminate the various and multiple factors intersecting with student's educational lives. Their narratives uncovered the following themes: (a) Homelessness as a misnomer, (b) Homelessness is not a choice, (c) Caring adults, and (d) Student agency. Their counternarratives challenge adults working with unaccompanied homeless youth to rethink and reimagine the manner in which homelessness is understood and framed; this is especially critical in educational spaces. Schools often are the primary contexts in which youth spend their time and can be instrumental to providing youth experiencing homelessness with the support and resources they identify as being critical to their educational engagement and success. (author abstract)

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