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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Glynn, Sarah Jane; Farrell, Jane; Wu, Nancy
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2013

    In his 2013 State of the Union address, President Barack Obama made a historic pledge to provide universal, high-quality pre-K education to our nation’s children. He chose to make this one of his administration’s priorities with good reason: Early childhood education has myriad benefits, including better, more equitable long-term outcomes for children of divergent economic backgrounds. Moreover, investments in these programs help cultivate a future workforce, secure long-term economic competitiveness, and develop our nation’s future leaders. Universal high-quality pre-K and child care would also throw a much-needed raft to families across America that are struggling to stay afloat while footing costly child care bills, missing work to provide care, or sending their children—our nation’s future innovators and workforce—to low-quality care centers.(author abstract)

    In his 2013 State of the Union address, President Barack Obama made a historic pledge to provide universal, high-quality pre-K education to our nation’s children. He chose to make this one of his administration’s priorities with good reason: Early childhood education has myriad benefits, including better, more equitable long-term outcomes for children of divergent economic backgrounds. Moreover, investments in these programs help cultivate a future workforce, secure long-term economic competitiveness, and develop our nation’s future leaders. Universal high-quality pre-K and child care would also throw a much-needed raft to families across America that are struggling to stay afloat while footing costly child care bills, missing work to provide care, or sending their children—our nation’s future innovators and workforce—to low-quality care centers.(author abstract)

  • Individual Author: National Women's Law Center
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2012

    As most states gradually begin to recover economically after several years in which their budgets were under tremendous strain, a number of the states are taking this opportunity to make or consider new investments in early care and education. These states recognize that early care and education will advance their short- and longterm economic prosperity by enabling parents to work and giving children the strong start they need to succeed in school and ultimately contribute to the workforce. Unfortunately, a few states have looked to cut child care and early education. Cutting these services reduces families’ access to the stable, high-quality child care that encourages children’s learning and development. Additionally, these cuts prevent child care programs from filling their classrooms, forcing them to lay off staff or close their doors entirely. (author abstract)

    As most states gradually begin to recover economically after several years in which their budgets were under tremendous strain, a number of the states are taking this opportunity to make or consider new investments in early care and education. These states recognize that early care and education will advance their short- and longterm economic prosperity by enabling parents to work and giving children the strong start they need to succeed in school and ultimately contribute to the workforce. Unfortunately, a few states have looked to cut child care and early education. Cutting these services reduces families’ access to the stable, high-quality child care that encourages children’s learning and development. Additionally, these cuts prevent child care programs from filling their classrooms, forcing them to lay off staff or close their doors entirely. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Bryant, Rhonda T.
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2013

    CLASP and the Scholars Network on Black Masculinity collaborated to host a joint working session on May 2-3, 2013. This meeting attracted 32 nationally recognized researchers and policy advocates, representing 25 institutions of higher education, research organizations, national membership organizations, national policy organizations, civil rights groups, and foundations interested in this issue. The convening had three objectives: 1.To develop formal and meaningful relationships between researchers and national policy advocates; 2.To connect research findings to national, state, and local policy discussions that support solutions to the dropout and employment crisis for middle school, high school, and out-of-school black males; 3.To reach consensus and focus efforts on activities over the next two years that advance policy solutions for employment and dropout prevention and recovery for middle school, high school, and out-of-school black males. (author abstract)

    CLASP and the Scholars Network on Black Masculinity collaborated to host a joint working session on May 2-3, 2013. This meeting attracted 32 nationally recognized researchers and policy advocates, representing 25 institutions of higher education, research organizations, national membership organizations, national policy organizations, civil rights groups, and foundations interested in this issue. The convening had three objectives: 1.To develop formal and meaningful relationships between researchers and national policy advocates; 2.To connect research findings to national, state, and local policy discussions that support solutions to the dropout and employment crisis for middle school, high school, and out-of-school black males; 3.To reach consensus and focus efforts on activities over the next two years that advance policy solutions for employment and dropout prevention and recovery for middle school, high school, and out-of-school black males. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Burke, Mike; Sims, Kate; Anderson, Signe; FirtzSimons, Crystal; Hewins, Jessie
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2013

    When the school year ends, millions of low-income children lose access to the school breakfasts and lunches they rely on during the school year. The federal Summer Nutrition Programs—the Summer Food Service Program (SFSP) and the National School Lunch Program (NSLP)—are designed to replace the regular school year programs, providing low-income children access to the nutritious meals they need to keep hunger at bay and remain healthy throughout the summer. The meals provided through the Summer Nutrition Programs also play an important role in drawing children into educational, enrichment, and recreational programming that keep them learning, engaged, active, safe, and moving during school vacation. (author abstract)

    When the school year ends, millions of low-income children lose access to the school breakfasts and lunches they rely on during the school year. The federal Summer Nutrition Programs—the Summer Food Service Program (SFSP) and the National School Lunch Program (NSLP)—are designed to replace the regular school year programs, providing low-income children access to the nutritious meals they need to keep hunger at bay and remain healthy throughout the summer. The meals provided through the Summer Nutrition Programs also play an important role in drawing children into educational, enrichment, and recreational programming that keep them learning, engaged, active, safe, and moving during school vacation. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Wauchope, Barbara; Jaffee, Elenor; Lyons, Kristen; Lutz, Aimee Delaney
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2013

    The information in this New Hampshire Kids Count Cities Data Book is primarily a story about children living in these large communities. However; to ensure we describe children from across the state, we include several smaller, more rural towns as well.

    The NH Kids Count Cities Data Book expands on the 2010/2011 New Hampshire Kids Count Data Book which reported state and county level data. This book focuses on fourteen cities and towns in our state reporting on 24 indicators of child well-being. Together these two New Hampshire publications provide a nuanced perspective of Granite State children and young adults, portraying areas of accomplishment as well as areas of need among the children and families of our state.(author abstract)

    The information in this New Hampshire Kids Count Cities Data Book is primarily a story about children living in these large communities. However; to ensure we describe children from across the state, we include several smaller, more rural towns as well.

    The NH Kids Count Cities Data Book expands on the 2010/2011 New Hampshire Kids Count Data Book which reported state and county level data. This book focuses on fourteen cities and towns in our state reporting on 24 indicators of child well-being. Together these two New Hampshire publications provide a nuanced perspective of Granite State children and young adults, portraying areas of accomplishment as well as areas of need among the children and families of our state.(author abstract)

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