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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: Turner, Margery Austin; Santos, Robert; Levy, Diane K.; Wissoker, Douglas A.; Aranda, Claudia; Pitingolo, Rob
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2013

    For much of the twentieth century, discrimination by private real estate agents and rental property owners helped establish and sustain stark patterns of housing and neighborhood inequality. Beginning in the late 1970s, the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) has rigorously monitored trends in racial and ethnic discrimination in both rental and sales markets approximately once each decade through a series of nationwide paired-testing studies. This summary report presents findings from the fourth such study, which applied paired-testing methodology in 28 metropolitan areas to measure the incidence and forms of discrimination experienced by black, Hispanic, and Asian renters and homebuyers.

    When well-qualified minority homeseekers contact housing providers to inquire about recently advertised housing units, they generally are just as likely as equally qualified white homeseekers to get an appointment and learn about at least one available housing unit. However, when differences in treatment occur, white homeseekers are more likely to be favored than minorities...

    For much of the twentieth century, discrimination by private real estate agents and rental property owners helped establish and sustain stark patterns of housing and neighborhood inequality. Beginning in the late 1970s, the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) has rigorously monitored trends in racial and ethnic discrimination in both rental and sales markets approximately once each decade through a series of nationwide paired-testing studies. This summary report presents findings from the fourth such study, which applied paired-testing methodology in 28 metropolitan areas to measure the incidence and forms of discrimination experienced by black, Hispanic, and Asian renters and homebuyers.

    When well-qualified minority homeseekers contact housing providers to inquire about recently advertised housing units, they generally are just as likely as equally qualified white homeseekers to get an appointment and learn about at least one available housing unit. However, when differences in treatment occur, white homeseekers are more likely to be favored than minorities. Most important, minority homeseekers are told about and shown fewer homes and apartments than whites. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Toldson, Ivory A. ; Crowell, Candice
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2012

    The purpose of this project is to provide an analysis of policy issues affecting middle school and high school-aged boys and young men of color in the areas of education, health, and pathways to employment. This policy scan and subsequent recommendations will provide valuable background knowledge to inform the future direction of policy efforts for the target population. In addition, findings from this analysis will be used to inform the framing of future policy discussions and implementation at the national, state, and local level. CLASP designed four surveys to gather data about policies and programming affecting men and boys of color. Participants were instructed to select a survey to complete based on their area of expertise. If participants had expertise in multiple areas, they were encouraged to complete multiple surveys. The target audience included anyone involved with providing services, programming, research, or policy on education, employment, and health for males of color. The four surveys included: (1) Middle School Aged Boys; (2) High School Aged Young Men; (3)...

    The purpose of this project is to provide an analysis of policy issues affecting middle school and high school-aged boys and young men of color in the areas of education, health, and pathways to employment. This policy scan and subsequent recommendations will provide valuable background knowledge to inform the future direction of policy efforts for the target population. In addition, findings from this analysis will be used to inform the framing of future policy discussions and implementation at the national, state, and local level. CLASP designed four surveys to gather data about policies and programming affecting men and boys of color. Participants were instructed to select a survey to complete based on their area of expertise. If participants had expertise in multiple areas, they were encouraged to complete multiple surveys. The target audience included anyone involved with providing services, programming, research, or policy on education, employment, and health for males of color. The four surveys included: (1) Middle School Aged Boys; (2) High School Aged Young Men; (3) Health; and (4) Out-of-School Young Men. Each survey consisted of demographic questions that detailed participants' sex, city and state of residence, industry, and position type. Ten issues were listed for participants to rank according to their level of importance. Volunteers were then asked to answer open-ended/qualitative questions about the top three issues they chose. The open-ended questions included assessing whether they knew of local or national agencies working to address the issues and whether policy supported initiatives around those issues. Survey results are presented. Transcript of Telephone interviews is appended. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Mora, Marie T.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2011

    Using public-use data from the 2009 American Community Survey, this study analyzes poverty rates among Hispanic and Asian adults while considering “fractionalized” immigrant generations: Generation 1.75 (those who migrated to the U.S. before the age of six), Generation 1.5 (those who migrated at between the ages of 6-18 and acquired some of their primary or secondary education in the U.S.), and Generation 1.0 (those who migrated after completing all of their primary and secondary education abroad). Consistent with other studies on immigrant/native poverty differentials, first generation immigrants in both groups were significantly more likely to be impoverished than U.S. natives. However, Generation 1.75, and to a lesser extent, Generation 1.5 Hispanic adults had significantly lower poverty rates than their U.S.-born counterparts, while Generation 1.75 and 1.5 Asian adults had similar poverty rates as U.S.-born Asians. Differences in socioeconomic, demographic, and geographic characteristics do not fully explain these differences. Such findings indicate that poverty reduction...

    Using public-use data from the 2009 American Community Survey, this study analyzes poverty rates among Hispanic and Asian adults while considering “fractionalized” immigrant generations: Generation 1.75 (those who migrated to the U.S. before the age of six), Generation 1.5 (those who migrated at between the ages of 6-18 and acquired some of their primary or secondary education in the U.S.), and Generation 1.0 (those who migrated after completing all of their primary and secondary education abroad). Consistent with other studies on immigrant/native poverty differentials, first generation immigrants in both groups were significantly more likely to be impoverished than U.S. natives. However, Generation 1.75, and to a lesser extent, Generation 1.5 Hispanic adults had significantly lower poverty rates than their U.S.-born counterparts, while Generation 1.75 and 1.5 Asian adults had similar poverty rates as U.S.-born Asians. Differences in socioeconomic, demographic, and geographic characteristics do not fully explain these differences. Such findings indicate that poverty reduction policies might be more effective if they go beyond considering broad classifications of race/ethnicity and birthplace, incorporating at a minimum the timing of migration among foreign-born in their lifecycles. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Riccio, James A.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 1999

    The Jobs-Plus Community Revitalization Initiative for Public Housing Families (Jobs-Plus, for short) grew out of The Rockefeller Foundation's interest in sponsoring community-building initiatives that feature employment as both the central goal and the driving force for transforming poor neighborhoods. The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development joined The Rockefeller Foundation in its efforts, and MDRC agreed to manage Jobs-Plus and conduct a comprehensive evaluation of its implementation, costs, and effectiveness. The first in a series of documents that detail that evaluation, this report describes the main components of the program and outlines operations at the eight housing developments (in seven cities) that were selected as sites in March 1997. It also explores key aspects of Jobs-Plus, including the formation of agency and community organization partnerships around an employment agenda and the feasibility of providing services, incentives, and supports for work at saturation levels within a community. (author abstract)

    The Jobs-Plus Community Revitalization Initiative for Public Housing Families (Jobs-Plus, for short) grew out of The Rockefeller Foundation's interest in sponsoring community-building initiatives that feature employment as both the central goal and the driving force for transforming poor neighborhoods. The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development joined The Rockefeller Foundation in its efforts, and MDRC agreed to manage Jobs-Plus and conduct a comprehensive evaluation of its implementation, costs, and effectiveness. The first in a series of documents that detail that evaluation, this report describes the main components of the program and outlines operations at the eight housing developments (in seven cities) that were selected as sites in March 1997. It also explores key aspects of Jobs-Plus, including the formation of agency and community organization partnerships around an employment agenda and the feasibility of providing services, incentives, and supports for work at saturation levels within a community. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Mayer, Neil S.; Piven, Matt
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2012

    Mortgage foreclosure has been a central component of the current recession, as an outcome of the economic and housing market crisis and as a cause of the recession’s depth and continuation. The foreclosure problem has hit people of color particularly hard. A key question is whether people of color and other vulnerable populations are receiving assistance in proportion to their shares among those in mortgage difficulty. Using public data on the Home Affordable Modification Program (HAMP), this study finds that race, ethnicity, gender, and income have very little impact on homeowners’ direct participation in and net benefits from HAMP. (author abstract)

    Mortgage foreclosure has been a central component of the current recession, as an outcome of the economic and housing market crisis and as a cause of the recession’s depth and continuation. The foreclosure problem has hit people of color particularly hard. A key question is whether people of color and other vulnerable populations are receiving assistance in proportion to their shares among those in mortgage difficulty. Using public data on the Home Affordable Modification Program (HAMP), this study finds that race, ethnicity, gender, and income have very little impact on homeowners’ direct participation in and net benefits from HAMP. (author abstract)

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