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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Meit, Michael; Levintow, Sara; Langerman, Heather; Meyer, Katherine; Gilbert, Tess; Hafford, Carol; Knudson, Alana; Hernandez, Aleena; Carino, Theresa; Allis, Paul
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2013

    This brief discusses the academic and social supportive services that students in the Tribal HPOG program are receiving to support their participation, retention and advancement in their trainings. It provides an overview of Tribal HPOG and the supportive services offered; how supportive services meet students’ needs; and promising approaches in delivering supportive services. The brief is part of a series of briefs being developed by the Tribal HPOG evaluation team, comprised of NORC at the University of Chicago, Red Star Innovations and the National Indian Health Board (NIHB). (author abstract)

    This brief discusses the academic and social supportive services that students in the Tribal HPOG program are receiving to support their participation, retention and advancement in their trainings. It provides an overview of Tribal HPOG and the supportive services offered; how supportive services meet students’ needs; and promising approaches in delivering supportive services. The brief is part of a series of briefs being developed by the Tribal HPOG evaluation team, comprised of NORC at the University of Chicago, Red Star Innovations and the National Indian Health Board (NIHB). (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Toldson, Ivory A. ; Crowell, Candice
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2012

    The purpose of this project is to provide an analysis of policy issues affecting middle school and high school-aged boys and young men of color in the areas of education, health, and pathways to employment. This policy scan and subsequent recommendations will provide valuable background knowledge to inform the future direction of policy efforts for the target population. In addition, findings from this analysis will be used to inform the framing of future policy discussions and implementation at the national, state, and local level. CLASP designed four surveys to gather data about policies and programming affecting men and boys of color. Participants were instructed to select a survey to complete based on their area of expertise. If participants had expertise in multiple areas, they were encouraged to complete multiple surveys. The target audience included anyone involved with providing services, programming, research, or policy on education, employment, and health for males of color. The four surveys included: (1) Middle School Aged Boys; (2) High School Aged Young Men; (3)...

    The purpose of this project is to provide an analysis of policy issues affecting middle school and high school-aged boys and young men of color in the areas of education, health, and pathways to employment. This policy scan and subsequent recommendations will provide valuable background knowledge to inform the future direction of policy efforts for the target population. In addition, findings from this analysis will be used to inform the framing of future policy discussions and implementation at the national, state, and local level. CLASP designed four surveys to gather data about policies and programming affecting men and boys of color. Participants were instructed to select a survey to complete based on their area of expertise. If participants had expertise in multiple areas, they were encouraged to complete multiple surveys. The target audience included anyone involved with providing services, programming, research, or policy on education, employment, and health for males of color. The four surveys included: (1) Middle School Aged Boys; (2) High School Aged Young Men; (3) Health; and (4) Out-of-School Young Men. Each survey consisted of demographic questions that detailed participants' sex, city and state of residence, industry, and position type. Ten issues were listed for participants to rank according to their level of importance. Volunteers were then asked to answer open-ended/qualitative questions about the top three issues they chose. The open-ended questions included assessing whether they knew of local or national agencies working to address the issues and whether policy supported initiatives around those issues. Survey results are presented. Transcript of Telephone interviews is appended. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Gordon, Anne; Oddo, Vanessa
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2012

    American Indians living on reservations or in other tribal areas (Indian Country) are among the most disadvantaged populations in the United States. The Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010 (HHFKA), section 141, requires the Department of Agriculture (USDA) to report to Congress on the ways that Federal nutrition programs can help overcome child hunger and nutrition problems on Indian reservations. To meet this requirement, this report addresses three questions:

    1. What is the level of food insecurity, obesity, and Type II diabetes1 among American Indian children living in Indian Country?
    2. What is the scope and reach of Federal nutrition programs in Indian Country?
    3. How can the HHFKA improve food security and reduce obesity and diabetes risk among American Indian children living in Indian Country?

    Before addressing these issues, we briefly describe the population of American Indians (AIs) as a whole and those living in Indian Country. We define AIs, in general, as those who report American Indian as their race in the U.S. Census or other national...

    American Indians living on reservations or in other tribal areas (Indian Country) are among the most disadvantaged populations in the United States. The Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010 (HHFKA), section 141, requires the Department of Agriculture (USDA) to report to Congress on the ways that Federal nutrition programs can help overcome child hunger and nutrition problems on Indian reservations. To meet this requirement, this report addresses three questions:

    1. What is the level of food insecurity, obesity, and Type II diabetes1 among American Indian children living in Indian Country?
    2. What is the scope and reach of Federal nutrition programs in Indian Country?
    3. How can the HHFKA improve food security and reduce obesity and diabetes risk among American Indian children living in Indian Country?

    Before addressing these issues, we briefly describe the population of American Indians (AIs) as a whole and those living in Indian Country. We define AIs, in general, as those who report American Indian as their race in the U.S. Census or other national surveys and are not Alaska Natives (ANs). In some instances, however, we report data on AIs and ANs together, as that is all that is available, and ANs are less than 10 percent of the combined group. Whenever not stated otherwise, we use those reporting AI or AN as their only race. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families
    Reference Type: Regulation
    Year: 2004

    ACF is issuing final regulations to implement direct funding to Indian Tribes and Tribal organizations under section 455(f) of the Social Security Act (the Act). Section 455(f) of the Act authorizes direct funding of Tribal Child Support Enforcement (IV-D) programs meeting requirements contained in the statute and established by the Secretary of HHS by regulation. These regulations address these requirements and related provisions, and provide guidance to Tribes and Tribal organizations on how to apply for and, upon approval, receive direct funding for the operation of Tribal IV-D programs. (author abstract)

    69 Fed. Reg. 16638 (2004).

     

    ACF is issuing final regulations to implement direct funding to Indian Tribes and Tribal organizations under section 455(f) of the Social Security Act (the Act). Section 455(f) of the Act authorizes direct funding of Tribal Child Support Enforcement (IV-D) programs meeting requirements contained in the statute and established by the Secretary of HHS by regulation. These regulations address these requirements and related provisions, and provide guidance to Tribes and Tribal organizations on how to apply for and, upon approval, receive direct funding for the operation of Tribal IV-D programs. (author abstract)

    69 Fed. Reg. 16638 (2004).

     

  • Individual Author: Pickering, Kathleen; Mushinski, David; Allen, John
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2006

    Researchers’ and practitioners’ recognition of the importance of community social and cultural relations (“social capital”) to effective implementation of poverty reduction projects and differences in social capital across communities suggest that such projects should be tailored to the types of social capital present in a given community. Drawing upon a data set collected by the Northwest Area Foundation of twelve Native American communities which includes a wide array of questions regarding social capital, this paper evaluates the different types of social capital in each community and considers the implications of that capital for the types of poverty reduction programs which would be effective in each community. We find differences in social capital across the communities in the study, with resulting differing implications for economic development and poverty reduction projects. Our results support observations that social capital is a community-specific phenomenon and must, therefore, be studied at the local level. (author abstract)

    Researchers’ and practitioners’ recognition of the importance of community social and cultural relations (“social capital”) to effective implementation of poverty reduction projects and differences in social capital across communities suggest that such projects should be tailored to the types of social capital present in a given community. Drawing upon a data set collected by the Northwest Area Foundation of twelve Native American communities which includes a wide array of questions regarding social capital, this paper evaluates the different types of social capital in each community and considers the implications of that capital for the types of poverty reduction programs which would be effective in each community. We find differences in social capital across the communities in the study, with resulting differing implications for economic development and poverty reduction projects. Our results support observations that social capital is a community-specific phenomenon and must, therefore, be studied at the local level. (author abstract)

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