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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families
    Reference Type: Regulation
    Year: 2004

    ACF is issuing final regulations to implement direct funding to Indian Tribes and Tribal organizations under section 455(f) of the Social Security Act (the Act). Section 455(f) of the Act authorizes direct funding of Tribal Child Support Enforcement (IV-D) programs meeting requirements contained in the statute and established by the Secretary of HHS by regulation. These regulations address these requirements and related provisions, and provide guidance to Tribes and Tribal organizations on how to apply for and, upon approval, receive direct funding for the operation of Tribal IV-D programs. (author abstract)

    69 Fed. Reg. 16638 (2004).

     

    ACF is issuing final regulations to implement direct funding to Indian Tribes and Tribal organizations under section 455(f) of the Social Security Act (the Act). Section 455(f) of the Act authorizes direct funding of Tribal Child Support Enforcement (IV-D) programs meeting requirements contained in the statute and established by the Secretary of HHS by regulation. These regulations address these requirements and related provisions, and provide guidance to Tribes and Tribal organizations on how to apply for and, upon approval, receive direct funding for the operation of Tribal IV-D programs. (author abstract)

    69 Fed. Reg. 16638 (2004).

     

  • Individual Author: Berman, Jacqueline; Coffee-Borden, Brandon
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2011

    The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (the Recovery Act) used various strategies to redress unemployment challenges experienced by disadvantaged youth. The Employment and Training Administration (ETA) in the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) received $1.2 billion for youth training and employment services.  ETA allocated about $17.8 million of these funds to Indian and Native American (INA) youth through the INA Supplemental Youth Services Program.  INA grantees were encouraged to use these funds to provide employment experiences to youth in summer 2009 and summer 2010.  INA grantees responded by building on existing summer youth employment programs to extend services to additional youth, including older youth, and create new program components as appropriate and needed.

    This report describes the context in which programs for the INA Summer Youth Employment Initiative were created and provides a detailed discussion of how grantees used their Recovery Act funds to implement programs to serve youth in their communities.  The analysis is...

    The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (the Recovery Act) used various strategies to redress unemployment challenges experienced by disadvantaged youth. The Employment and Training Administration (ETA) in the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) received $1.2 billion for youth training and employment services.  ETA allocated about $17.8 million of these funds to Indian and Native American (INA) youth through the INA Supplemental Youth Services Program.  INA grantees were encouraged to use these funds to provide employment experiences to youth in summer 2009 and summer 2010.  INA grantees responded by building on existing summer youth employment programs to extend services to additional youth, including older youth, and create new program components as appropriate and needed.

    This report describes the context in which programs for the INA Summer Youth Employment Initiative were created and provides a detailed discussion of how grantees used their Recovery Act funds to implement programs to serve youth in their communities.  The analysis is based on INA grantees’ performance measure data and qualitative data collected during site visits to a purposive sample of five diverse grantees in five states.  This report also highlights key findings and innovations grantees made to better serve youth. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Bush, Janet
    Reference Type: Thesis
    Year: 2009

    The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between fertility and household economy on Montana’s Northern Plains. Low fertility and outmigration in European American communities have led to dramatic depopulation of the region. At the same time, isolated Indian reservations in the area have grown in population due to high fertility and return migration.

    A mixed methods research approach was used to explore the relationship between fertility and social acceptance of communal household economic strategies. Census data and birth records described differences in fertility and household economy between European American and Native American populations in six Plains Indian reservation counties; inferential tests demonstrated patterns of variation among fertility and economic variables in 37 rural counties. Qualitative ethnographic data were collected in two representative communities, one predominately European American and one predominately Native American, documenting individual beliefs and actions that reflected and reinforced community themes of ideal fertility...

    The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between fertility and household economy on Montana’s Northern Plains. Low fertility and outmigration in European American communities have led to dramatic depopulation of the region. At the same time, isolated Indian reservations in the area have grown in population due to high fertility and return migration.

    A mixed methods research approach was used to explore the relationship between fertility and social acceptance of communal household economic strategies. Census data and birth records described differences in fertility and household economy between European American and Native American populations in six Plains Indian reservation counties; inferential tests demonstrated patterns of variation among fertility and economic variables in 37 rural counties. Qualitative ethnographic data were collected in two representative communities, one predominately European American and one predominately Native American, documenting individual beliefs and actions that reflected and reinforced community themes of ideal fertility.

    Findings delineated value constellations that supported culturally specific fertility ideals. European American informants idealized delayed parenthood, childrearing within a nuclear family setting, household self-sufficiency, and avoidance of public assistance. In contrast, Native American informants idealized early parenthood, childrearing within an extended family setting, mutually dependent extended family households, and acceptance of tribal assistance without stigmatization.

    Analyses of state and tribal TANF programs and teen pregnancy prevention initiatives illustrate culturally specific approaches to public policy that influence fertility behaviors. State and federal programs reinforce dominant culture ideals of delayed parenthood and nuclear family self-sufficiency; they pathologize Native American patterns of family formation by removing parenthood from the context of community. Some tribes have assumed administration of TANF and adapted the program in order to preserve traditional childrearing practices and maintain family-building systems. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Cole, Patricia; Buel, Sarah M.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2000

    This paper looks at family violence and its impact upon the transition from welfare to work under the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families Program (TANF) established by the 1996 welfare reform. Recommendations are presented which encourages advocates and others to increase their involvement in welfare reform and other initiatives that target families living in extreme poverty. The paper addressed two primary issues. First, working within the TANF and welfare to work systems were discussed in order to identify and assist women in violent partnerships. And, second, helping low-income women gain employment and other necessary assistance so they are able to support themselves and escape the violent situation their poverty had perpetuated. Insights offered included: (1) women in extremely low-income households are much more likely to be victims of violence than women in higher-income households; (2) traditional mainstream approaches to helping battered women are often ineffective; and (3) it is impossible to separate women’s experiences with and responses to partner violence from...

    This paper looks at family violence and its impact upon the transition from welfare to work under the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families Program (TANF) established by the 1996 welfare reform. Recommendations are presented which encourages advocates and others to increase their involvement in welfare reform and other initiatives that target families living in extreme poverty. The paper addressed two primary issues. First, working within the TANF and welfare to work systems were discussed in order to identify and assist women in violent partnerships. And, second, helping low-income women gain employment and other necessary assistance so they are able to support themselves and escape the violent situation their poverty had perpetuated. Insights offered included: (1) women in extremely low-income households are much more likely to be victims of violence than women in higher-income households; (2) traditional mainstream approaches to helping battered women are often ineffective; and (3) it is impossible to separate women’s experiences with and responses to partner violence from the impact of poverty and other oppressions in their lives. The paper emphasized the Family Violence Option (FVO) allowing States to exempt TANF recipients from workforce participation if it would escalate domestic violence, impede escape from domestic violence, or result in sanctions against women as a result of domestic violence. Several insights were gained on how to reach and assist women in dealing with violent relationships that included: (1) services need to be located at or near TANF offices; (2) programs need to be race conscious, being both sensitive and responsive to different cultural experiences and values in order to achieve program participation; (3) basic survival needs, such as housing, food, clothing, or health care must be resolved before or as part of the work around family violence issues; and (4) assistance must be offered to increase their safety while in the abusive relationship. Several recommendations were offered as to how women in poverty who suffer from domestic violence should be treated that included: (1) providing pre- and post- employment education and training; (2) providing services necessary to gain and maintain living-wage employment; and (3) providing ongoing support in the areas of housing, child care, food stamps, and health care for those unable to get and keep jobs that have adequate wages and benefits. Welfare reform is seen as having brought attention to many battered women previously overlooked. Creating effective solutions is viewed as necessary to allow them to be both safe and financially secure. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Pickering, Kathleen
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2000

    The premise of current welfare policies is that recipients are avoiding work and that requiring work will end welfare dependency.  Unemployment is equated with labor market inexperience and economic inactivity.  The Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, a poor rural community with high unemployment, contradicts these assumptions.  Many Lakota individuals have off-reservation wage work experience; there simply are not enough local jobs to absorb their human capital.  Lakota households, however, are involved in a complex combination of socially embedded economic activities outside wage work.  Imposing the premises of TANF on Pine Ridge results in indirect pressures toward urban migration and cultural assimilation.  Furthermore, by imposing rigid notions of work, TANF runs the risk of destroying the economic flexibility that makes survival possible for poor households in Pine Ridge.  Welfare and development policies need to reflect the real economies of rural American Indian reservations rather than those of superficially assimilated and economically imagined communities. (author abstract...

    The premise of current welfare policies is that recipients are avoiding work and that requiring work will end welfare dependency.  Unemployment is equated with labor market inexperience and economic inactivity.  The Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, a poor rural community with high unemployment, contradicts these assumptions.  Many Lakota individuals have off-reservation wage work experience; there simply are not enough local jobs to absorb their human capital.  Lakota households, however, are involved in a complex combination of socially embedded economic activities outside wage work.  Imposing the premises of TANF on Pine Ridge results in indirect pressures toward urban migration and cultural assimilation.  Furthermore, by imposing rigid notions of work, TANF runs the risk of destroying the economic flexibility that makes survival possible for poor households in Pine Ridge.  Welfare and development policies need to reflect the real economies of rural American Indian reservations rather than those of superficially assimilated and economically imagined communities. (author abstract)

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