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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Aikens, Nikki; Klein, Ashley Kopak; Tarullo, Louisa; West, Jerry
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2013

    This report describes the family backgrounds and developmental outcomes of children as they completed the program and also describes progress in children’s outcomes between Head Start entry and exit. It focuses on the population of children who entered Head Start for the first time in fall 2009 and completed one or two years of the program in spring 2010 or spring 2011 before entering kindergarten. This report on children’s kindergarten readiness is the third in a series of reports describing data from the 2009 cohort of the Head Start Family and Child Experiences Survey (FACES 2009). Previous FACES 2009 reports described the characteristics of children and their families and programs as they entered Head Start in fall 2009 and at the end of one year in the program. (Author abstract)

    This report describes the family backgrounds and developmental outcomes of children as they completed the program and also describes progress in children’s outcomes between Head Start entry and exit. It focuses on the population of children who entered Head Start for the first time in fall 2009 and completed one or two years of the program in spring 2010 or spring 2011 before entering kindergarten. This report on children’s kindergarten readiness is the third in a series of reports describing data from the 2009 cohort of the Head Start Family and Child Experiences Survey (FACES 2009). Previous FACES 2009 reports described the characteristics of children and their families and programs as they entered Head Start in fall 2009 and at the end of one year in the program. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Werner, Alan; Rappaport, Catherine D.; Stuart, Jennifer B.; Lewis, Jennifer
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2013

    In recent years workforce development and welfare reform policy and programs, as well as the nation’s technical and community colleges, have been faced increasingly with the challenge of preparing low-income individuals with limited vocational skills and work experience for better-paying jobs requiring post-secondary training. Career pathways (CP) programs have developed over the past decade as a comprehensive framework of adult developmental and vocational education and supportive services designed to address this challenge. They represent a potential structural change in the system of vocational training for their target populations. Most of the Health Profession Opportunity Grants (HPOG) programs have implemented workforce development programs that include many, if not all, of the essential components of the CP framework. This report reviews selected research studies on CP program design, implementation, outcomes and impacts. It is intended to inform the design of an implementation, systems and outcomes evaluation of HPOG. This evaluation (referred to as the HPOG National...

    In recent years workforce development and welfare reform policy and programs, as well as the nation’s technical and community colleges, have been faced increasingly with the challenge of preparing low-income individuals with limited vocational skills and work experience for better-paying jobs requiring post-secondary training. Career pathways (CP) programs have developed over the past decade as a comprehensive framework of adult developmental and vocational education and supportive services designed to address this challenge. They represent a potential structural change in the system of vocational training for their target populations. Most of the Health Profession Opportunity Grants (HPOG) programs have implemented workforce development programs that include many, if not all, of the essential components of the CP framework. This report reviews selected research studies on CP program design, implementation, outcomes and impacts. It is intended to inform the design of an implementation, systems and outcomes evaluation of HPOG. This evaluation (referred to as the HPOG National Implementation Evaluation) is being designed to address the following major research questions:

    • • How are health professions training programs being implemented across the grantee sites?
    • • What changes to the service delivery system are associated with program implementation?
    • • What individual-level outputs and outcomes occur (for example: recruitment, enrollment, retention, completion, certification, job entry, employment retention and advancement, and earnings)?
    • • What can be learned about how best to implement these programs for this population (what implementation and/or systems components are related to program outputs and outcomes)?
    • • What key components appear necessary or contribute to the success of these programs?

    This literature review essay includes a section on CP program design and implementation, a section on outcome and impact studies and a section summarizing the implications of the research literature for the HPOG National Implementation Evaluation design. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Meit, Michael; Levintow, Sara; Langerman, Heather; Meyer, Katherine; Gilbert, Tess; Hafford, Carol; Knudson, Alana; Hernandez, Aleena; Carino, Theresa; Allis, Paul
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2013

    This brief discusses the academic and social supportive services that students in the Tribal HPOG program are receiving to support their participation, retention and advancement in their trainings. It provides an overview of Tribal HPOG and the supportive services offered; how supportive services meet students’ needs; and promising approaches in delivering supportive services. The brief is part of a series of briefs being developed by the Tribal HPOG evaluation team, comprised of NORC at the University of Chicago, Red Star Innovations and the National Indian Health Board (NIHB). (author abstract)

    This brief discusses the academic and social supportive services that students in the Tribal HPOG program are receiving to support their participation, retention and advancement in their trainings. It provides an overview of Tribal HPOG and the supportive services offered; how supportive services meet students’ needs; and promising approaches in delivering supportive services. The brief is part of a series of briefs being developed by the Tribal HPOG evaluation team, comprised of NORC at the University of Chicago, Red Star Innovations and the National Indian Health Board (NIHB). (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: McDaniel, Marla; Pergamit, Michael R.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2013

    Young adults formerly in foster care are less likely to be employed or enrolled in college at age 19 than their same-age peers nationally, contributing to greater economic instability in their early adult years. Social workers, educators, and policymakers question whether youth are adequately prepared for work but have difficulty assessing their job preparedness. This brief, prepared by the Urban Institute, uses data collected as part of the Multi-Site Evaluation of Foster Youth Programs to examine: 1) how youth in foster care rate their preparedness for work at age 17, and 2) whether their assessments accurately predict education and employment two years later. The results indicated that a high sense of job preparedness, particularly when combined with high reading skills, was associated with more employment and college enrollment among young adults currently and formerly in foster care. (author abstract)

    Young adults formerly in foster care are less likely to be employed or enrolled in college at age 19 than their same-age peers nationally, contributing to greater economic instability in their early adult years. Social workers, educators, and policymakers question whether youth are adequately prepared for work but have difficulty assessing their job preparedness. This brief, prepared by the Urban Institute, uses data collected as part of the Multi-Site Evaluation of Foster Youth Programs to examine: 1) how youth in foster care rate their preparedness for work at age 17, and 2) whether their assessments accurately predict education and employment two years later. The results indicated that a high sense of job preparedness, particularly when combined with high reading skills, was associated with more employment and college enrollment among young adults currently and formerly in foster care. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Elliott, Diana; Thomas, Hannah; Wilson, Denise; Sattelmeyer, Sarah
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2014

    Beginning with an overview of the measures and state of economic mobility in America, this session, moderated by Sarah Sattelmeyer (The Pew Charitable Trusts), will address three key questions related to mobility, specifically: Do all Americans enjoy equal opportunity at birth, regardless of the financial and economic status of their parents? What factors help propel someone up the economic ladder or push them down? What role should public policy play in promoting economic mobility?

    • Mobility and the Metropolis: How Communities Factor into Economic Mobility

    Diana Elliott (The Pew Charitable Trusts)

    • Hard Choices: Navigating the Economic Shock of Unemployment

    Hannah Thomas (Brandeis University)

    • Why Do Some Americans Leave the Bottom of the Economic Ladder, But Not Others?

    Denise Wilson (Independent Contractor) (conference program description)

    These presentations were given at the 2014 Welfare Research and Evaluation Conference (WREC).

    Beginning with an overview of the measures and state of economic mobility in America, this session, moderated by Sarah Sattelmeyer (The Pew Charitable Trusts), will address three key questions related to mobility, specifically: Do all Americans enjoy equal opportunity at birth, regardless of the financial and economic status of their parents? What factors help propel someone up the economic ladder or push them down? What role should public policy play in promoting economic mobility?

    • Mobility and the Metropolis: How Communities Factor into Economic Mobility

    Diana Elliott (The Pew Charitable Trusts)

    • Hard Choices: Navigating the Economic Shock of Unemployment

    Hannah Thomas (Brandeis University)

    • Why Do Some Americans Leave the Bottom of the Economic Ladder, But Not Others?

    Denise Wilson (Independent Contractor) (conference program description)

    These presentations were given at the 2014 Welfare Research and Evaluation Conference (WREC).

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