Skip to main content
Back to Top

SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

  • Conduct a search and filter parameters as desired.
  • "Check" the box next to the resources for which you would like a citation.
  • Select "Download Selected Citation" at the top of the Library Search Page.
  • Select your export style:
    • Text File.
    • RIS Format.
    • APA format.
  • Select submit and download your citations.

The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Werner, Alan; Rappaport, Catherine D.; Stuart, Jennifer B.; Lewis, Jennifer
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2013

    In recent years workforce development and welfare reform policy and programs, as well as the nation’s technical and community colleges, have been faced increasingly with the challenge of preparing low-income individuals with limited vocational skills and work experience for better-paying jobs requiring post-secondary training. Career pathways (CP) programs have developed over the past decade as a comprehensive framework of adult developmental and vocational education and supportive services designed to address this challenge. They represent a potential structural change in the system of vocational training for their target populations. Most of the Health Profession Opportunity Grants (HPOG) programs have implemented workforce development programs that include many, if not all, of the essential components of the CP framework. This report reviews selected research studies on CP program design, implementation, outcomes and impacts. It is intended to inform the design of an implementation, systems and outcomes evaluation of HPOG. This evaluation (referred to as the HPOG National...

    In recent years workforce development and welfare reform policy and programs, as well as the nation’s technical and community colleges, have been faced increasingly with the challenge of preparing low-income individuals with limited vocational skills and work experience for better-paying jobs requiring post-secondary training. Career pathways (CP) programs have developed over the past decade as a comprehensive framework of adult developmental and vocational education and supportive services designed to address this challenge. They represent a potential structural change in the system of vocational training for their target populations. Most of the Health Profession Opportunity Grants (HPOG) programs have implemented workforce development programs that include many, if not all, of the essential components of the CP framework. This report reviews selected research studies on CP program design, implementation, outcomes and impacts. It is intended to inform the design of an implementation, systems and outcomes evaluation of HPOG. This evaluation (referred to as the HPOG National Implementation Evaluation) is being designed to address the following major research questions:

    • • How are health professions training programs being implemented across the grantee sites?
    • • What changes to the service delivery system are associated with program implementation?
    • • What individual-level outputs and outcomes occur (for example: recruitment, enrollment, retention, completion, certification, job entry, employment retention and advancement, and earnings)?
    • • What can be learned about how best to implement these programs for this population (what implementation and/or systems components are related to program outputs and outcomes)?
    • • What key components appear necessary or contribute to the success of these programs?

    This literature review essay includes a section on CP program design and implementation, a section on outcome and impact studies and a section summarizing the implications of the research literature for the HPOG National Implementation Evaluation design. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Bettinger, Eric P.; Boatman, Angela; Long, Bridget Terry
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2013

    Low rates of college completion are a major problem in the United States. Less than 60 percent of students at four-year colleges graduate within six years, and at some colleges, the graduation rate is less than 10 percent. Additionally, many students enter higher education ill-prepared to comprehend college-level course material. Some estimates suggest that only one-third of high school graduates finish ready for college work; the proportion is even lower among older students. Colleges have responded to the poor preparation of incoming students by placing approximately 35 to 40 percent of entering freshmen into remedial or developmental courses, along with providing academic supports such as summer bridge programs, learning communities, academic counseling, and tutoring, as well as student supports such as financial aid and child care. Eric Bettinger, Angela Boatman, and Bridget Terry Long describe the role, costs, and impact of these college remediation and academic support programs.

    According to a growing body of research, the effects of remedial courses are considerably...

    Low rates of college completion are a major problem in the United States. Less than 60 percent of students at four-year colleges graduate within six years, and at some colleges, the graduation rate is less than 10 percent. Additionally, many students enter higher education ill-prepared to comprehend college-level course material. Some estimates suggest that only one-third of high school graduates finish ready for college work; the proportion is even lower among older students. Colleges have responded to the poor preparation of incoming students by placing approximately 35 to 40 percent of entering freshmen into remedial or developmental courses, along with providing academic supports such as summer bridge programs, learning communities, academic counseling, and tutoring, as well as student supports such as financial aid and child care. Eric Bettinger, Angela Boatman, and Bridget Terry Long describe the role, costs, and impact of these college remediation and academic support programs.

    According to a growing body of research, the effects of remedial courses are considerably nuanced. The courses appear to help or hinder students differently by state, institution, background, and academic preparedness. The mixed findings from earlier research have raised questions ranging from whether remedial programs, on average, improve student academic outcomes to which types of programs are most effective. Administrators, practitioners, and policy makers are responding by redesigning developmental courses and searching for ways to implement effective remediation programs more broadly. In addition, recent research suggests that colleges may be placing too many students into remedial courses unnecessarily, suggesting the need for further examining the placement processes used to assign students to remedial courses.

    The authors expand the scope of remediation research by discussing other promising areas of academic support commonly offered by colleges, including advising, tutoring, and mentoring programs, as well as supports that target the competing responsibilities of students, namely caring for dependents and balancing employment with schoolwork. They conclude that the limited resources of institutions and equally limited funds of students make it imperative for postsecondary institutions to improve student academic supports and other services. (author abstract)

     

  • Individual Author: Cox, Ron
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2012

    Eradicating poverty in the United States has eluded policymakers, researchers, and analysts for the past 50 years. After initial decreases  during the 1960s and early 1970s, poverty rates have remained stubbornly stable, wavering from 11% to 15% of the population (Gabe, 2012). Government programs have largely met with only limited success despite investing billions of dollars each year. Recently, a conceptual framework that more seamlessly integrates community and government agencies to form a comprehensive effort against poverty has gained momentum (Kania & Kramer, 2011). Informing this effort have been research findings from the social sciences that have established the decline of two-parent families through divorce and unwed childbearing as an underlying causal agent of poverty. Fueled by these findings, lawmakers made the promotion of healthy marriages and responsible fatherhood a central component of the 1996 Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity (PRWORA). This research brief examines the rationale behind a framework of integration, the effectiveness of healthy...

    Eradicating poverty in the United States has eluded policymakers, researchers, and analysts for the past 50 years. After initial decreases  during the 1960s and early 1970s, poverty rates have remained stubbornly stable, wavering from 11% to 15% of the population (Gabe, 2012). Government programs have largely met with only limited success despite investing billions of dollars each year. Recently, a conceptual framework that more seamlessly integrates community and government agencies to form a comprehensive effort against poverty has gained momentum (Kania & Kramer, 2011). Informing this effort have been research findings from the social sciences that have established the decline of two-parent families through divorce and unwed childbearing as an underlying causal agent of poverty. Fueled by these findings, lawmakers made the promotion of healthy marriages and responsible fatherhood a central component of the 1996 Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity (PRWORA). This research brief examines the rationale behind a framework of integration, the effectiveness of healthy marriage and as an intervention, and recent attempts to integrate healthy marriage and relationship education into Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) programs. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Golden, Olivia ; McDaniel, Marla; Loprest, Pamela J.; Stanczyk, Alexandra
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2013

    Considerable research attention has been devoted to low-income mothers disconnected from both work and welfare. This body of work has rarely highlighted disconnected mothers' roles as parents and has remained virtually silent about the experiences and well-being of their children. This paper synthesizes research findings to show that many of the circumstances disconnected mothers face pose major risks to children's development and potentially serious consequences for children. We describe potential interventions to help disconnected families by increasing and stabilizing family income, enhancing parenting skills, supporting children directly, and reaching out to disconnected mothers who are not citizens. (author abstract)

    Considerable research attention has been devoted to low-income mothers disconnected from both work and welfare. This body of work has rarely highlighted disconnected mothers' roles as parents and has remained virtually silent about the experiences and well-being of their children. This paper synthesizes research findings to show that many of the circumstances disconnected mothers face pose major risks to children's development and potentially serious consequences for children. We describe potential interventions to help disconnected families by increasing and stabilizing family income, enhancing parenting skills, supporting children directly, and reaching out to disconnected mothers who are not citizens. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Johnson, Clifford; Lopez, Ana Carricchi
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 1997

    A comprehensive examination of research findings on past and current efforts to create publicly-funded jobs for disadvantaged adults and youth. This synthesis of the research literature presents six lessons to guide the development of future job creation efforts. These lessons are supplemented by two-page summaries of findings from evaluations of ten particularly prominent or interesting job creation models and a list of selected research references.
    (author abstract)

    A comprehensive examination of research findings on past and current efforts to create publicly-funded jobs for disadvantaged adults and youth. This synthesis of the research literature presents six lessons to guide the development of future job creation efforts. These lessons are supplemented by two-page summaries of findings from evaluations of ten particularly prominent or interesting job creation models and a list of selected research references.
    (author abstract)

Sort by

Topical Area(s)

Popular Searches

Source

Year

Year ranges from 1991 to 2018

Reference Type

Research Methodology

Geographic Focus

Target Populations