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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Green, Gary
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2006

    Job training is an important factor in enhancing the economic well-being of workers. Technological advances, especially with computers, have led to dramatic improvements over the past decade or so in productivity and the demand for skilled workers. There are concerns, however, that many workers will be left behind in the shift toward a more “high-tech” economy. In particular, the persistence of gender and racial differences in earnings raises concerns that some workers may not be receiving enough training to be successful in the new economy.

    Along with the shift in demand for skilled workers, there has been a relatively important shift in how and where job training takes place. Historically, public policy has focused on developing training programs for workers in educational institutions and other organizations outside the workplace. Over the years these programs, especially for disadvantaged workers, proliferated and there was little coherence to the federal, and state, programs that were available. These programs have become more streamlined and coordinated through the...

    Job training is an important factor in enhancing the economic well-being of workers. Technological advances, especially with computers, have led to dramatic improvements over the past decade or so in productivity and the demand for skilled workers. There are concerns, however, that many workers will be left behind in the shift toward a more “high-tech” economy. In particular, the persistence of gender and racial differences in earnings raises concerns that some workers may not be receiving enough training to be successful in the new economy.

    Along with the shift in demand for skilled workers, there has been a relatively important shift in how and where job training takes place. Historically, public policy has focused on developing training programs for workers in educational institutions and other organizations outside the workplace. Over the years these programs, especially for disadvantaged workers, proliferated and there was little coherence to the federal, and state, programs that were available. These programs have become more streamlined and coordinated through the Workforce Investment Act, which establishes regional boards to coordinate training activities.

    There also has been a growing recognition that workers learn best in the their work environment. Numerous institutional innovations, such as youth apprenticeships, school-to-work programs, and others have placed much greater emphasis on experiential learning. Research on training also has focused increasingly on formal training offered by employers and the obstacles employers face in provided general training to their workforce.

    In this paper I examine the willingness of employers to provide formal training to women and minorities. The analysis focuses on the role of firm, worker and job characteristics in the receipt of job training. (author)

  • Individual Author: Swanson, Josephine A. ; Olson, Christine M. ; Miller, Emily O. ; Lawrence, Frances C.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2008

    Much of the research on low-income families, welfare, and self-sufficiency has focused on urban populations. Further, many of the studies on informal or social support available to and accessed by low-income families addressed needs such as childcare, transportation, money, or housing and did not focus on food issues. This paper focuses on how formal government food assistance programs and informal supports are utilized by rural low-income families as they work to meet their food needs. Drawing on interviews from the multi-state ‘‘Rural Families Speak’’ project, we examine food security in relation to the use of formal and informal supports. Additional analyses address how mothers view and describe their use of support to meet food needs. (author abstract)

    Much of the research on low-income families, welfare, and self-sufficiency has focused on urban populations. Further, many of the studies on informal or social support available to and accessed by low-income families addressed needs such as childcare, transportation, money, or housing and did not focus on food issues. This paper focuses on how formal government food assistance programs and informal supports are utilized by rural low-income families as they work to meet their food needs. Drawing on interviews from the multi-state ‘‘Rural Families Speak’’ project, we examine food security in relation to the use of formal and informal supports. Additional analyses address how mothers view and describe their use of support to meet food needs. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Arsneault, Shelly
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2006

    This piece argues that the very nature of rural poverty and the communities in which the rural poor live influence the administration of welfare programs that were designed to address urban poverty. Using in-depth interviews with case managers in urban and rural Kentucky along with statistical analysis from Kentucky's 120 counties, this study shows the very real challenges faced by administrators and highlights the challenges faced in both rural and urban communities. Importantly for public administration, resource constraints, the number of clientele served, geographic distances, and sense of community differently affect the implementation of welfare policy by place. The author suggests that because of the unique aspects of rural poverty, the welfare poor in rural communities may be best served by rules that emphasize local program variation. (author abstract)

    This piece argues that the very nature of rural poverty and the communities in which the rural poor live influence the administration of welfare programs that were designed to address urban poverty. Using in-depth interviews with case managers in urban and rural Kentucky along with statistical analysis from Kentucky's 120 counties, this study shows the very real challenges faced by administrators and highlights the challenges faced in both rural and urban communities. Importantly for public administration, resource constraints, the number of clientele served, geographic distances, and sense of community differently affect the implementation of welfare policy by place. The author suggests that because of the unique aspects of rural poverty, the welfare poor in rural communities may be best served by rules that emphasize local program variation. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Bush, Janet
    Reference Type: Thesis
    Year: 2009

    The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between fertility and household economy on Montana’s Northern Plains. Low fertility and outmigration in European American communities have led to dramatic depopulation of the region. At the same time, isolated Indian reservations in the area have grown in population due to high fertility and return migration.

    A mixed methods research approach was used to explore the relationship between fertility and social acceptance of communal household economic strategies. Census data and birth records described differences in fertility and household economy between European American and Native American populations in six Plains Indian reservation counties; inferential tests demonstrated patterns of variation among fertility and economic variables in 37 rural counties. Qualitative ethnographic data were collected in two representative communities, one predominately European American and one predominately Native American, documenting individual beliefs and actions that reflected and reinforced community themes of ideal fertility...

    The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between fertility and household economy on Montana’s Northern Plains. Low fertility and outmigration in European American communities have led to dramatic depopulation of the region. At the same time, isolated Indian reservations in the area have grown in population due to high fertility and return migration.

    A mixed methods research approach was used to explore the relationship between fertility and social acceptance of communal household economic strategies. Census data and birth records described differences in fertility and household economy between European American and Native American populations in six Plains Indian reservation counties; inferential tests demonstrated patterns of variation among fertility and economic variables in 37 rural counties. Qualitative ethnographic data were collected in two representative communities, one predominately European American and one predominately Native American, documenting individual beliefs and actions that reflected and reinforced community themes of ideal fertility.

    Findings delineated value constellations that supported culturally specific fertility ideals. European American informants idealized delayed parenthood, childrearing within a nuclear family setting, household self-sufficiency, and avoidance of public assistance. In contrast, Native American informants idealized early parenthood, childrearing within an extended family setting, mutually dependent extended family households, and acceptance of tribal assistance without stigmatization.

    Analyses of state and tribal TANF programs and teen pregnancy prevention initiatives illustrate culturally specific approaches to public policy that influence fertility behaviors. State and federal programs reinforce dominant culture ideals of delayed parenthood and nuclear family self-sufficiency; they pathologize Native American patterns of family formation by removing parenthood from the context of community. Some tribes have assumed administration of TANF and adapted the program in order to preserve traditional childrearing practices and maintain family-building systems. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Fletcher, Cynthia Needles; Garasky, Steven; Jensen, Helen H.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2002

    This paper uses a new dataset, the Iowa Transportation and Employment Survey, to examine transportation-related barriers to employment among households in a 5-county area that includes a small metropolitan county, two counties adjacent to the metro area, and two rural nonadjacent counties. Human capital barriers and transportation problems are significantly greater among low-income compared to other households, and among low-income nonworking adults compared to their employed counterparts. A two-stage multivariate analysis suggests that human capital, transportation resources and barriers, and location are predictors of employment and wages. (Author abstract)

    This paper uses a new dataset, the Iowa Transportation and Employment Survey, to examine transportation-related barriers to employment among households in a 5-county area that includes a small metropolitan county, two counties adjacent to the metro area, and two rural nonadjacent counties. Human capital barriers and transportation problems are significantly greater among low-income compared to other households, and among low-income nonworking adults compared to their employed counterparts. A two-stage multivariate analysis suggests that human capital, transportation resources and barriers, and location are predictors of employment and wages. (Author abstract)

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