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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Bryant, Rhonda T.
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2013

    CLASP and the Scholars Network on Black Masculinity collaborated to host a joint working session on May 2-3, 2013. This meeting attracted 32 nationally recognized researchers and policy advocates, representing 25 institutions of higher education, research organizations, national membership organizations, national policy organizations, civil rights groups, and foundations interested in this issue. The convening had three objectives: 1.To develop formal and meaningful relationships between researchers and national policy advocates; 2.To connect research findings to national, state, and local policy discussions that support solutions to the dropout and employment crisis for middle school, high school, and out-of-school black males; 3.To reach consensus and focus efforts on activities over the next two years that advance policy solutions for employment and dropout prevention and recovery for middle school, high school, and out-of-school black males. (author abstract)

    CLASP and the Scholars Network on Black Masculinity collaborated to host a joint working session on May 2-3, 2013. This meeting attracted 32 nationally recognized researchers and policy advocates, representing 25 institutions of higher education, research organizations, national membership organizations, national policy organizations, civil rights groups, and foundations interested in this issue. The convening had three objectives: 1.To develop formal and meaningful relationships between researchers and national policy advocates; 2.To connect research findings to national, state, and local policy discussions that support solutions to the dropout and employment crisis for middle school, high school, and out-of-school black males; 3.To reach consensus and focus efforts on activities over the next two years that advance policy solutions for employment and dropout prevention and recovery for middle school, high school, and out-of-school black males. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Brooks, Jennifer; Duran, Angela; Medina, Jennifer
    Reference Type: Report, Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2013

    The workforce development and asset-building fields share the goal of ensuring individuals have the tools to participate in, contribute to and benefit from the mainstream economy. Yet although they share a goal, each field approaches the challenge from a different angle. In general, workforce development providers help individuals navigate and succeed in the labor market by providing a range of services that build skills and human capital and connect them to jobs. A successful outcome for a workforce program is when a customer obtains steady employment that provides adequate income, and ideally, a promising career path. Asset-building providers, by contrast, focus on helping individuals navigate and succeed in the financial marketplace by providing a range of services that help individuals make the most of their income in both the short and long terms. These services, which focus on improving financial capability, helping individuals access appropriate and affordable financial products, building savings and avoiding predatory practices, are designed to help individuals build...

    The workforce development and asset-building fields share the goal of ensuring individuals have the tools to participate in, contribute to and benefit from the mainstream economy. Yet although they share a goal, each field approaches the challenge from a different angle. In general, workforce development providers help individuals navigate and succeed in the labor market by providing a range of services that build skills and human capital and connect them to jobs. A successful outcome for a workforce program is when a customer obtains steady employment that provides adequate income, and ideally, a promising career path. Asset-building providers, by contrast, focus on helping individuals navigate and succeed in the financial marketplace by providing a range of services that help individuals make the most of their income in both the short and long terms. These services, which focus on improving financial capability, helping individuals access appropriate and affordable financial products, building savings and avoiding predatory practices, are designed to help individuals build financial resilience that can help during times of crisis and build a nest egg that supports future goals. This guide is designed to explore the possibilities for workforce development agencies to integrate asset-building strategies into their already-robust programming to maximize the overall effectiveness of their programs. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Karpman, Michael
    Reference Type: Report, Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2013

    National League of Cities has published a new report highlighting promising city efforts to improve the lives of children, youth and families in communities with populations below 75,000. "Municipal Leadership for Children and Families in Small and Mid-Sized Cities" provides a rich array of strategies shared by local officials representing more than 40 cities and towns across the country. The report combines in-depth case studies of comprehensive family strengthening efforts in Rapid City, S.D., and Manchester, Conn. with a set of shorter city practices categorized by topic area that highlight local action in a broad range of areas. (author abstract)

    National League of Cities has published a new report highlighting promising city efforts to improve the lives of children, youth and families in communities with populations below 75,000. "Municipal Leadership for Children and Families in Small and Mid-Sized Cities" provides a rich array of strategies shared by local officials representing more than 40 cities and towns across the country. The report combines in-depth case studies of comprehensive family strengthening efforts in Rapid City, S.D., and Manchester, Conn. with a set of shorter city practices categorized by topic area that highlight local action in a broad range of areas. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Bettinger, Eric P.; Boatman, Angela; Long, Bridget Terry
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2013

    Low rates of college completion are a major problem in the United States. Less than 60 percent of students at four-year colleges graduate within six years, and at some colleges, the graduation rate is less than 10 percent. Additionally, many students enter higher education ill-prepared to comprehend college-level course material. Some estimates suggest that only one-third of high school graduates finish ready for college work; the proportion is even lower among older students. Colleges have responded to the poor preparation of incoming students by placing approximately 35 to 40 percent of entering freshmen into remedial or developmental courses, along with providing academic supports such as summer bridge programs, learning communities, academic counseling, and tutoring, as well as student supports such as financial aid and child care. Eric Bettinger, Angela Boatman, and Bridget Terry Long describe the role, costs, and impact of these college remediation and academic support programs.

    According to a growing body of research, the effects of remedial courses are considerably...

    Low rates of college completion are a major problem in the United States. Less than 60 percent of students at four-year colleges graduate within six years, and at some colleges, the graduation rate is less than 10 percent. Additionally, many students enter higher education ill-prepared to comprehend college-level course material. Some estimates suggest that only one-third of high school graduates finish ready for college work; the proportion is even lower among older students. Colleges have responded to the poor preparation of incoming students by placing approximately 35 to 40 percent of entering freshmen into remedial or developmental courses, along with providing academic supports such as summer bridge programs, learning communities, academic counseling, and tutoring, as well as student supports such as financial aid and child care. Eric Bettinger, Angela Boatman, and Bridget Terry Long describe the role, costs, and impact of these college remediation and academic support programs.

    According to a growing body of research, the effects of remedial courses are considerably nuanced. The courses appear to help or hinder students differently by state, institution, background, and academic preparedness. The mixed findings from earlier research have raised questions ranging from whether remedial programs, on average, improve student academic outcomes to which types of programs are most effective. Administrators, practitioners, and policy makers are responding by redesigning developmental courses and searching for ways to implement effective remediation programs more broadly. In addition, recent research suggests that colleges may be placing too many students into remedial courses unnecessarily, suggesting the need for further examining the placement processes used to assign students to remedial courses.

    The authors expand the scope of remediation research by discussing other promising areas of academic support commonly offered by colleges, including advising, tutoring, and mentoring programs, as well as supports that target the competing responsibilities of students, namely caring for dependents and balancing employment with schoolwork. They conclude that the limited resources of institutions and equally limited funds of students make it imperative for postsecondary institutions to improve student academic supports and other services. (author abstract)

     

  • Individual Author: Jacobson, Louis; LaLonde, Robert J.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2013

    Training programs provide opportunities for low-income individuals to qualify for better jobs and enter the middle class. These programs also provide opportunities for workers who lost long-held jobs to qualify for new positions that can offset a substantial fraction of their earnings losses. Although millions of workers seek out career and technical training options in the pursuit of financial security and better lives, many ultimately choose programs that do not suit their needs. Some individuals do not complete their training programs, some find that their new skills do not match the needs of local employers, while many others, uncertain of the outcomes, hesitate to invest time and money into training programs altogether. Too many workers are making poor choices in training, but fortunately, this problem can be resolved by helping workers select programs that they are more likely to complete and that are more likely to raise their earnings potential. This paper proposes a state-by-state solution, relying on a competitive framework to encourage states to help prospective...

    Training programs provide opportunities for low-income individuals to qualify for better jobs and enter the middle class. These programs also provide opportunities for workers who lost long-held jobs to qualify for new positions that can offset a substantial fraction of their earnings losses. Although millions of workers seek out career and technical training options in the pursuit of financial security and better lives, many ultimately choose programs that do not suit their needs. Some individuals do not complete their training programs, some find that their new skills do not match the needs of local employers, while many others, uncertain of the outcomes, hesitate to invest time and money into training programs altogether. Too many workers are making poor choices in training, but fortunately, this problem can be resolved by helping workers select programs that they are more likely to complete and that are more likely to raise their earnings potential. This paper proposes a state-by-state solution, relying on a competitive framework to encourage states to help prospective trainees make better-informed choices. The plan will increase the return on training investments by developing the data and measures necessary to provide the information prospective trainees need, by presenting the information in user-friendly “report cards,” by providing help for prospective trainees to use the information effectively, and by creating incentives for states to implement permanent information systems once they prove cost-effective. Using a mix of online systems coupled with assistance from career counselors, the ultimate goal of this proposal is to provide unambiguous evidence about how information systems can improve training outcomes for prospective trainees. With the earnings divide between skilled and unskilled workers at a historic high, it is imperative that we raise overall workforce skills in order to enhance America’s competitiveness and ensure economic growth for all Americans. (author abstract)

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