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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Glynn, Sarah Jane; Farrell, Jane; Wu, Nancy
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2013

    In his 2013 State of the Union address, President Barack Obama made a historic pledge to provide universal, high-quality pre-K education to our nation’s children. He chose to make this one of his administration’s priorities with good reason: Early childhood education has myriad benefits, including better, more equitable long-term outcomes for children of divergent economic backgrounds. Moreover, investments in these programs help cultivate a future workforce, secure long-term economic competitiveness, and develop our nation’s future leaders. Universal high-quality pre-K and child care would also throw a much-needed raft to families across America that are struggling to stay afloat while footing costly child care bills, missing work to provide care, or sending their children—our nation’s future innovators and workforce—to low-quality care centers.(author abstract)

    In his 2013 State of the Union address, President Barack Obama made a historic pledge to provide universal, high-quality pre-K education to our nation’s children. He chose to make this one of his administration’s priorities with good reason: Early childhood education has myriad benefits, including better, more equitable long-term outcomes for children of divergent economic backgrounds. Moreover, investments in these programs help cultivate a future workforce, secure long-term economic competitiveness, and develop our nation’s future leaders. Universal high-quality pre-K and child care would also throw a much-needed raft to families across America that are struggling to stay afloat while footing costly child care bills, missing work to provide care, or sending their children—our nation’s future innovators and workforce—to low-quality care centers.(author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Denk, Oliver; Hagemann, Robert P.; Lenain, Patrick; Somma, Valentin
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2013

    Income inequality and relative poverty in the United States are among the highest in the OECD and have substantially increased over the past decades. These developments have been associated with a number of other worrying statistics, including low intergenerational social mobility and weak real income growth for many households. A more inclusive pattern of growth would require less pronounced gaps in outcomes and opportunities across social groups and a broader sharing of the benefits of growth. The present paper analyses the causes of US income inequality and relative poverty in an OECD context, especially the role of the tax-and-transfer system, and suggests public policies to promote inclusive growth. To a significant degree, high income inequality is attributable to the large dispersion of earned income, which should be addressed by reforming education, so as to provide disadvantaged students with the skills needed to fully realise their potential. In addition, taxes and transfers contribute less to income redistribution than in other OECD countries. If well designed, reforms...

    Income inequality and relative poverty in the United States are among the highest in the OECD and have substantially increased over the past decades. These developments have been associated with a number of other worrying statistics, including low intergenerational social mobility and weak real income growth for many households. A more inclusive pattern of growth would require less pronounced gaps in outcomes and opportunities across social groups and a broader sharing of the benefits of growth. The present paper analyses the causes of US income inequality and relative poverty in an OECD context, especially the role of the tax-and-transfer system, and suggests public policies to promote inclusive growth. To a significant degree, high income inequality is attributable to the large dispersion of earned income, which should be addressed by reforming education, so as to provide disadvantaged students with the skills needed to fully realise their potential. In addition, taxes and transfers contribute less to income redistribution than in other OECD countries. If well designed, reforms that promote inclusive growth could also help reduce the market distortions resulting from the current tax-and-transfer system. In particular, phasing out personal and corporate tax expenditures that disproportionately benefit high earners would lower income inequality and improve resource allocation. As well, social transfers could be more effective in alleviating poverty through better targeting of the truly needy while reducing administrative complexity. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: National Skills Coalition
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2013

    Comprehensive immigration reform has tremendous economic potential for individuals and the nation as a whole and will result in far-reaching changes to the labor market. In order to create economic growth and opportunity, though, the legislation must include an equally ambitious, integrated investment in skills—far greater than what is currently proposed. There will likely be a significant increase in demand for adult education by currently undocumented immigrants, not to mention the already existing unmet need for English language, adult literacy, and skills training for U.S. citizens. The proposal currently under consideration is insufficient to meet these growing programmatic demands. With support from the Ford Foundation, NSC has worked with local and national partners with expertise in workforce development, adult education and immigrant integration, to develop this proposal for a skills strategy that would dramatically increase the amount and impact of resources available for skills training – for immigrant and native-born workers – without increasing the cost of...

    Comprehensive immigration reform has tremendous economic potential for individuals and the nation as a whole and will result in far-reaching changes to the labor market. In order to create economic growth and opportunity, though, the legislation must include an equally ambitious, integrated investment in skills—far greater than what is currently proposed. There will likely be a significant increase in demand for adult education by currently undocumented immigrants, not to mention the already existing unmet need for English language, adult literacy, and skills training for U.S. citizens. The proposal currently under consideration is insufficient to meet these growing programmatic demands. With support from the Ford Foundation, NSC has worked with local and national partners with expertise in workforce development, adult education and immigrant integration, to develop this proposal for a skills strategy that would dramatically increase the amount and impact of resources available for skills training – for immigrant and native-born workers – without increasing the cost of comprehensive immigration reform. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Wandner, Stephen A.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2013

    Based on surveys of state workforce and unemployment insurance (UI) administrators, this study examines how the public workforce system responded to declining funding after the Great Recession. Funding for workforce programs declined sharply, while demand for services remained high. Most states did not supplement federal funding. Instead, they reduced the number of workers served, changed the mix of services offered, and replaced training and more intensive services with less intensive services. UI programs continued paying benefits, but because program administration did not keep pace with benefit payments, states responded by reducing UI staffing and increasing automation. (author abstract)

    Based on surveys of state workforce and unemployment insurance (UI) administrators, this study examines how the public workforce system responded to declining funding after the Great Recession. Funding for workforce programs declined sharply, while demand for services remained high. Most states did not supplement federal funding. Instead, they reduced the number of workers served, changed the mix of services offered, and replaced training and more intensive services with less intensive services. UI programs continued paying benefits, but because program administration did not keep pace with benefit payments, states responded by reducing UI staffing and increasing automation. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: National Women's Law Center
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2012

    As most states gradually begin to recover economically after several years in which their budgets were under tremendous strain, a number of the states are taking this opportunity to make or consider new investments in early care and education. These states recognize that early care and education will advance their short- and longterm economic prosperity by enabling parents to work and giving children the strong start they need to succeed in school and ultimately contribute to the workforce. Unfortunately, a few states have looked to cut child care and early education. Cutting these services reduces families’ access to the stable, high-quality child care that encourages children’s learning and development. Additionally, these cuts prevent child care programs from filling their classrooms, forcing them to lay off staff or close their doors entirely. (Author abstract)

    As most states gradually begin to recover economically after several years in which their budgets were under tremendous strain, a number of the states are taking this opportunity to make or consider new investments in early care and education. These states recognize that early care and education will advance their short- and longterm economic prosperity by enabling parents to work and giving children the strong start they need to succeed in school and ultimately contribute to the workforce. Unfortunately, a few states have looked to cut child care and early education. Cutting these services reduces families’ access to the stable, high-quality child care that encourages children’s learning and development. Additionally, these cuts prevent child care programs from filling their classrooms, forcing them to lay off staff or close their doors entirely. (Author abstract)

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