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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Curran, Laura
    Year: 2003

    In recent years social welfare policies and practices have increasingly addressed men's roles as fathers. The landmark welfare reform legislation, the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996 (PRWORA) (P.L. 104-193), contains significant revisions in child support legislation. Rapid growth has occurred in the number of social services programs working with fathers. This article introduces social workers to these policy and practice initiatives. Through a critical review of research and descriptive programmatic material, this article considers the mixed implications of these policy and practice interventions for family well-being and recommends future directions for policy and practice.(author abstract)

    In recent years social welfare policies and practices have increasingly addressed men's roles as fathers. The landmark welfare reform legislation, the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996 (PRWORA) (P.L. 104-193), contains significant revisions in child support legislation. Rapid growth has occurred in the number of social services programs working with fathers. This article introduces social workers to these policy and practice initiatives. Through a critical review of research and descriptive programmatic material, this article considers the mixed implications of these policy and practice interventions for family well-being and recommends future directions for policy and practice.(author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Camasso, Michael J.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2003

    This study examines life quality perceptions and changes in these perceptions for a sample of aid to families with dependent children (AFDC) women (N = 78) where homelessness led to their participation in publicly funded transitional housing. Questionnaires were administered to these women at three times: upon their entry into the program, 3 to 5 months after entry, and 3 to 5 months after graduation. Panel data were analyzed using static score and conditional change autoregressive models. Results of these analyses indicate that this type of serial crisis intervention program can change perceptions of life quality positively, with the change especially apparent among women with lower preprogram dissatisfaction levels. Findings are interpreted within the framework of system inertia proposed by James Coleman. (author abstract)

    This study examines life quality perceptions and changes in these perceptions for a sample of aid to families with dependent children (AFDC) women (N = 78) where homelessness led to their participation in publicly funded transitional housing. Questionnaires were administered to these women at three times: upon their entry into the program, 3 to 5 months after entry, and 3 to 5 months after graduation. Panel data were analyzed using static score and conditional change autoregressive models. Results of these analyses indicate that this type of serial crisis intervention program can change perceptions of life quality positively, with the change especially apparent among women with lower preprogram dissatisfaction levels. Findings are interpreted within the framework of system inertia proposed by James Coleman. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Gurmu, Shiferaw; Ihlanfeldt, Keith R.; Smith, William J.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2008

    We study the factors affecting the employment probability of temporary assistance for needy families (TANF) recipients using recent quarterly panel data from Atlanta, Georgia. A central focus of our study is to determine whether the TANF recipient's proximity to job opportunity and the availability of childcare affect her probability of full-time employment. Both static and dynamic models of employment choice are estimated that control for unobserved individual effects. We estimate models separately for a sub-sample of TANF recipients living in public housing, whose residential locations can be considered exogenously determined. We find substantial evidence that individuals and family characteristics (such as, the education of the recipient and the number of children and adults in her family) are important determinants of the employment probability of welfare recipients. On the other hand, location related variables are found to be relatively unimportant. (author abstract)

    This article is based on a...

    We study the factors affecting the employment probability of temporary assistance for needy families (TANF) recipients using recent quarterly panel data from Atlanta, Georgia. A central focus of our study is to determine whether the TANF recipient's proximity to job opportunity and the availability of childcare affect her probability of full-time employment. Both static and dynamic models of employment choice are estimated that control for unobserved individual effects. We estimate models separately for a sub-sample of TANF recipients living in public housing, whose residential locations can be considered exogenously determined. We find substantial evidence that individuals and family characteristics (such as, the education of the recipient and the number of children and adults in her family) are important determinants of the employment probability of welfare recipients. On the other hand, location related variables are found to be relatively unimportant. (author abstract)

    This article is based on a working paper published by the University of Kentucky Center for Poverty Research.

  • Individual Author: Barrera-Osorio, Felipe; Bertrand, Marianne; Linden, Leigh; Perez-Calle, Francisco
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2011

    Using a student level randomization, we compare three education-based conditional cash transfers designs: a standard design, a design where part of the monthly transfers are postponed until children have to re-enroll in school, and a design that lowers the reward for attendance but incentivizes graduation and tertiary enrollment. The two nonstandard designs significantly increase enrollment rates at both the secondary and tertiary levels while delivering the same attendance gains as the standard design. Postponing some of the attendance transfers to the time of re-enrollment appears particularly effective for the most at-risk children. (author abstract)

    Using a student level randomization, we compare three education-based conditional cash transfers designs: a standard design, a design where part of the monthly transfers are postponed until children have to re-enroll in school, and a design that lowers the reward for attendance but incentivizes graduation and tertiary enrollment. The two nonstandard designs significantly increase enrollment rates at both the secondary and tertiary levels while delivering the same attendance gains as the standard design. Postponing some of the attendance transfers to the time of re-enrollment appears particularly effective for the most at-risk children. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Wight, Vanessa; Kaushal, Neeraj; Waldfogel, Jane; Garfinkel, Irwin
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2014

    This paper examines the association between poverty and food insecurity among children, using two different definitions of poverty – the official poverty measure (OPM) and the new supplemental poverty measure (SPM) of the Census Bureau, which is based on a more inclusive definition of family resources and needs. Our analysis is based on data from the 2001–2011 Current Population Survey and shows that food insecurity and very low food security among children decline as income-to-needs ratio increases. The point estimates show that the associations are stronger as measured by the new supplemental measure of income-to-needs ratio than when estimated through the official measure. Statistical tests reject the hypothesis that poor households' odds of experiencing low food security are the same whether the SPM or OPM measure is used; but the tests do not reject the hypothesis when very low food security is the outcome. (author abstract)

    This article was based on a previously published working paper from...

    This paper examines the association between poverty and food insecurity among children, using two different definitions of poverty – the official poverty measure (OPM) and the new supplemental poverty measure (SPM) of the Census Bureau, which is based on a more inclusive definition of family resources and needs. Our analysis is based on data from the 2001–2011 Current Population Survey and shows that food insecurity and very low food security among children decline as income-to-needs ratio increases. The point estimates show that the associations are stronger as measured by the new supplemental measure of income-to-needs ratio than when estimated through the official measure. Statistical tests reject the hypothesis that poor households' odds of experiencing low food security are the same whether the SPM or OPM measure is used; but the tests do not reject the hypothesis when very low food security is the outcome. (author abstract)

    This article was based on a previously published working paper from the University of Kentucky Center for Poverty Research.

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