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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Muennig, Peter; Rosen, Zohn; Wilde, Ty
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2013

    During the 1990s reforms to the US welfare system introduced new time limits on people’s eligibility to receive public assistance. These limits were developed to encourage welfare recipients to seek employment. Little is known about how such social policy programs may have affected participants’ health. We explored whether the Florida Family Transition Program randomized trial, a welfare reform experiment, led to long-term changes in mortality among participants. The Florida program included a 24–36-month time limit for welfare participation, intensive job training, and placement assistance. We linked 3,224 participants from the experiment to 17–18 years of prospective mortality follow-up data and found that participants in the program experienced a 16 percent higher mortality rate than recipients of traditional welfare. If our results are generalizable to national welfare reform efforts, they raise questions about whether the cost savings associated with welfare reform justify the additional loss of life. (author abstract)

    During the 1990s reforms to the US welfare system introduced new time limits on people’s eligibility to receive public assistance. These limits were developed to encourage welfare recipients to seek employment. Little is known about how such social policy programs may have affected participants’ health. We explored whether the Florida Family Transition Program randomized trial, a welfare reform experiment, led to long-term changes in mortality among participants. The Florida program included a 24–36-month time limit for welfare participation, intensive job training, and placement assistance. We linked 3,224 participants from the experiment to 17–18 years of prospective mortality follow-up data and found that participants in the program experienced a 16 percent higher mortality rate than recipients of traditional welfare. If our results are generalizable to national welfare reform efforts, they raise questions about whether the cost savings associated with welfare reform justify the additional loss of life. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Rosenbaum, Sara
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2013

    The article discusses the state of Medicaid in the wake of the U.S. Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA), with particular focus on the prospects for further healthcare reform given the political landscapes surrounding the program. It states that Medicaid was largely transformed by the ACA, but needs further reform to be part of a comprehensive national plan to provide universal health insurance coverage. It adds that the potential decline of Medicaid will be a strong political determination than a program driven mainly by health policy. (author abstract)

    The article discusses the state of Medicaid in the wake of the U.S. Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA), with particular focus on the prospects for further healthcare reform given the political landscapes surrounding the program. It states that Medicaid was largely transformed by the ACA, but needs further reform to be part of a comprehensive national plan to provide universal health insurance coverage. It adds that the potential decline of Medicaid will be a strong political determination than a program driven mainly by health policy. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Russinova, Zlatka; Rogers, E. Sally; Ellison, Marsha Langer; Bloch, Philippe; Lyass, Asya; Wewiorski, Nancy
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2013

    This study explored the predictors of financial self-sufficiency among Social Security beneficiaries with psychiatric disabilities. The study was conducted with individuals who were either past or current disability beneficiaries and who had sustained competitive employment as evidenced by their involvement in a longitudinal investigation on sustained employment among persons with serious mental illnesses. We conducted an exploratory cross-sectional study employing a survey methodology to determine what factors were associated with participants' capacity to leave the Social Security disability rolls due to gainful employment. We used a stepwise approach to data analysis to explore the association of demographic, clinical, vocational and motivational factors with financial self-sufficiency. Results suggested that individuals with higher occupational status, higher levels of proactive coping and without medical comorbidities were more likely to terminate Social Security disability benefits and achieve financial self-sufficiency due to gainful employment. Study findings can inform...

    This study explored the predictors of financial self-sufficiency among Social Security beneficiaries with psychiatric disabilities. The study was conducted with individuals who were either past or current disability beneficiaries and who had sustained competitive employment as evidenced by their involvement in a longitudinal investigation on sustained employment among persons with serious mental illnesses. We conducted an exploratory cross-sectional study employing a survey methodology to determine what factors were associated with participants' capacity to leave the Social Security disability rolls due to gainful employment. We used a stepwise approach to data analysis to explore the association of demographic, clinical, vocational and motivational factors with financial self-sufficiency. Results suggested that individuals with higher occupational status, higher levels of proactive coping and without medical comorbidities were more likely to terminate Social Security disability benefits and achieve financial self-sufficiency due to gainful employment. Study findings can inform the development of innovative interventions targeting these malleable predictors associated with financial self-sufficiency among persons with psychiatric disabilities. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Finkelstein, Amy; Taubman, Sarah; Wright, Bill; Bernstein, Mira; Gruber, Jonathan; Newhouse, Joseph P.; Allen, Heidi; Baicker, Katherine
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2012

    In 2008, a group of uninsured low-income adults in Oregon was selected by lottery to be given the chance to apply for Medicaid. This lottery provides an opportunity to gauge the effects of expanding access to public health insurance on the health care use, financial strain, and health of low-income adults using a randomized controlled design. In the year after random assignment, the treatment group selected by the lottery was about 25 percentage points more likely to have insurance than the control group that was not selected. We find that in this first year, the treatment group had substantively and statistically significantly higher health care utilization (including primary and preventive care as well as hospitalizations), lower out-of-pocket medical expenditures and medical debt (including fewer bills sent to collection), and better self-reported physical and mental health than the control group. (author abstract)

    In 2008, a group of uninsured low-income adults in Oregon was selected by lottery to be given the chance to apply for Medicaid. This lottery provides an opportunity to gauge the effects of expanding access to public health insurance on the health care use, financial strain, and health of low-income adults using a randomized controlled design. In the year after random assignment, the treatment group selected by the lottery was about 25 percentage points more likely to have insurance than the control group that was not selected. We find that in this first year, the treatment group had substantively and statistically significantly higher health care utilization (including primary and preventive care as well as hospitalizations), lower out-of-pocket medical expenditures and medical debt (including fewer bills sent to collection), and better self-reported physical and mental health than the control group. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Han, Wen-Jui; Huang, Chien-Chung; Williams, Margaret
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2013

    Using data from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study (N = 2904), we investigated whether maternal work schedules were associated with Child Protective Services (CPS) involvement and child maltreatment indicators during the first five years of a child's life. We further examined if this association could be explained by demographic characteristics, child care arrangements, maternal health and social supports, economic and hardship characteristics, and parenting practices. Finally, we examined if this association differed by context (i.e., maternal marital status, maternal education, and family income-to-needs ratio). Our regression results indicate significant associations between maternal shift work and mother-reported CPS involvement and mother-reported psychological aggression behaviors. Economic and hardship characteristics explained some of the significant association between maternal shift work and CPS involvement. Economic and hardship characteristics and parenting practices also explained some of the significant association between maternal shift work and...

    Using data from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study (N = 2904), we investigated whether maternal work schedules were associated with Child Protective Services (CPS) involvement and child maltreatment indicators during the first five years of a child's life. We further examined if this association could be explained by demographic characteristics, child care arrangements, maternal health and social supports, economic and hardship characteristics, and parenting practices. Finally, we examined if this association differed by context (i.e., maternal marital status, maternal education, and family income-to-needs ratio). Our regression results indicate significant associations between maternal shift work and mother-reported CPS involvement and mother-reported psychological aggression behaviors. Economic and hardship characteristics explained some of the significant association between maternal shift work and CPS involvement. Economic and hardship characteristics and parenting practices also explained some of the significant association between maternal shift work and psychological aggression behaviors. The obtained significant associations were more pronounced for mothers who were not married, who were high school graduates, and whose family income was either below or near poverty. We discuss the broader social factors associated with employment demands and childcare arrangements. (author abstract)

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