Skip to main content
Back to Top

SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

  • Conduct a search and filter parameters as desired.
  • "Check" the box next to the resources for which you would like a citation.
  • Select "Download Selected Citation" at the top of the Library Search Page.
  • Select your export style:
    • Text File.
    • RIS Format.
    • APA format.
  • Select submit and download your citations.

The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Byrne, Thomas; Fargo, Jamison D.; Montgomery, Ann Elizabeth; Roberts, Christopher P.; Culhane, Dennis P.; Kane, Vincent
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2015

    Objective: This study examined veterans' responses to the Veterans Health Administration's (VHA's) universal screen for homelessness and risk of homelessness during the first 12 months of implementation.

    Methods: We calculated the baseline annual frequency of homelessness and risk of homelessness among all veterans who completed an initial screen during the study period. We measured changes in housing status among veterans who initially screened positive and then completed a follow-up screen, assessed factors associated with such changes, and identified distinct risk profiles of veterans who completed a follow-up screen.

    Results: More than 4 million veterans completed an initial screen; 1.8% (n=77,621) screened positive for homelessness or risk of homelessness. Of those who initially screened positive for either homelessness or risk of homelessness and who completed a second screen during the study period, 85.0% (n=15,060) resolved their housing instability prior to their second screen. Age, sex, race, VHA eligibility, and screening location were all associated with...

    Objective: This study examined veterans' responses to the Veterans Health Administration's (VHA's) universal screen for homelessness and risk of homelessness during the first 12 months of implementation.

    Methods: We calculated the baseline annual frequency of homelessness and risk of homelessness among all veterans who completed an initial screen during the study period. We measured changes in housing status among veterans who initially screened positive and then completed a follow-up screen, assessed factors associated with such changes, and identified distinct risk profiles of veterans who completed a follow-up screen.

    Results: More than 4 million veterans completed an initial screen; 1.8% (n=77,621) screened positive for homelessness or risk of homelessness. Of those who initially screened positive for either homelessness or risk of homelessness and who completed a second screen during the study period, 85.0% (n=15,060) resolved their housing instability prior to their second screen. Age, sex, race, VHA eligibility, and screening location were all associated with changes in housing stability. We identified four distinct risk profiles for veterans with ongoing housing instability.

    Conclusion: To address homelessness among veterans, efforts should include increased and targeted engagement of veterans experiencing persistent housing instability. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Heflin, Colleen; Miller, Kathleen
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2012

    Given the recent economic crisis and the accompanying funding cuts across social service programs, it is helpful to observe the geographic distribution of demographic characteristics and economic conditions that together create a human service needs profile. The authors provide a conceptual framework for a systematic analysis of county characteristics and demonstrate that rural areas of America have higher levels of needs and more complex needs than do metropolitan areas. This suggests that human service strategies that are successful in metropolitan areas may not translate well to nonmetropolitan areas. (Author abstract)

    Given the recent economic crisis and the accompanying funding cuts across social service programs, it is helpful to observe the geographic distribution of demographic characteristics and economic conditions that together create a human service needs profile. The authors provide a conceptual framework for a systematic analysis of county characteristics and demonstrate that rural areas of America have higher levels of needs and more complex needs than do metropolitan areas. This suggests that human service strategies that are successful in metropolitan areas may not translate well to nonmetropolitan areas. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Rosen, Marc I.; Ablondi, Karen; Black, Anne C.; Mueller, Lisa; Serowik, Kristin L.; Martino, Steve; Hur Mobo, Ben; Rosenheck, Robert A.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2014

    Objective:

    This study's objective was to determine the efficacy of benefits counseling in a clinical trial. There has been concern that disability payments for psychiatric disorders reduce incentives for employment and rehabilitation. Benefits counseling, with education about opportunities to work and the financial implications of work on receipt of disability benefits, may counter these disincentives.

    Methods:

    This single-blind, six-month randomized clinical trial enrolled 84 veterans who had applied for service-connected compensation for a psychiatric condition. Veterans were randomly assigned to either four sessions of benefits counseling or of a control condition involving orientation to the U.S Department of Veterans Affairs health care system and services. Days of paid work and work-related activities were assessed at follow-up visits by using a timeline follow-back calendar.

    Results:

    Veterans assigned to benefits counseling worked for pay for significantly more days than did veterans in...

    Objective:

    This study's objective was to determine the efficacy of benefits counseling in a clinical trial. There has been concern that disability payments for psychiatric disorders reduce incentives for employment and rehabilitation. Benefits counseling, with education about opportunities to work and the financial implications of work on receipt of disability benefits, may counter these disincentives.

    Methods:

    This single-blind, six-month randomized clinical trial enrolled 84 veterans who had applied for service-connected compensation for a psychiatric condition. Veterans were randomly assigned to either four sessions of benefits counseling or of a control condition involving orientation to the U.S Department of Veterans Affairs health care system and services. Days of paid work and work-related activities were assessed at follow-up visits by using a timeline follow-back calendar.

    Results:

    Veterans assigned to benefits counseling worked for pay for significantly more days than did veterans in the control group (effect size=.69, p<.05), reflecting an average of three more days of paid employment during the 28 days preceding the six-month follow-up. Benefits counseling was associated with increased use of mental health services, but this correlation did not mediate the effect of benefits counseling on working.

    Conclusions:

    Barriers to employment associated with disability payments are remediable with basic counseling. More research is needed to understand the active ingredient of this counseling and to strengthen the intervention. (Author abstract)