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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Russinova, Zlatka; Rogers, E. Sally; Ellison, Marsha Langer; Bloch, Philippe; Lyass, Asya; Wewiorski, Nancy
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2013

    This study explored the predictors of financial self-sufficiency among Social Security beneficiaries with psychiatric disabilities. The study was conducted with individuals who were either past or current disability beneficiaries and who had sustained competitive employment as evidenced by their involvement in a longitudinal investigation on sustained employment among persons with serious mental illnesses. We conducted an exploratory cross-sectional study employing a survey methodology to determine what factors were associated with participants' capacity to leave the Social Security disability rolls due to gainful employment. We used a stepwise approach to data analysis to explore the association of demographic, clinical, vocational and motivational factors with financial self-sufficiency. Results suggested that individuals with higher occupational status, higher levels of proactive coping and without medical comorbidities were more likely to terminate Social Security disability benefits and achieve financial self-sufficiency due to gainful employment. Study findings can inform...

    This study explored the predictors of financial self-sufficiency among Social Security beneficiaries with psychiatric disabilities. The study was conducted with individuals who were either past or current disability beneficiaries and who had sustained competitive employment as evidenced by their involvement in a longitudinal investigation on sustained employment among persons with serious mental illnesses. We conducted an exploratory cross-sectional study employing a survey methodology to determine what factors were associated with participants' capacity to leave the Social Security disability rolls due to gainful employment. We used a stepwise approach to data analysis to explore the association of demographic, clinical, vocational and motivational factors with financial self-sufficiency. Results suggested that individuals with higher occupational status, higher levels of proactive coping and without medical comorbidities were more likely to terminate Social Security disability benefits and achieve financial self-sufficiency due to gainful employment. Study findings can inform the development of innovative interventions targeting these malleable predictors associated with financial self-sufficiency among persons with psychiatric disabilities. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Lubin, Andrea; Deka, Devajyoti
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2012

    Transportation barriers are often cited as the primary reason for the discrepancy in employment rate between persons with disabilities and others. Yet little information is available about the transportation barriers and needs of persons with disabilities who are searching for employment. The primary objective of this descriptive paper is to share valuable information from a unique survey of persons with disabilities who are actively searching for employment in New Jersey. The paper examines the role of public transportation in providing job access to persons with disabilities. It provides information and insights on the availability, usage, needs, barriers, and perceptions of the survey respondents about different public transit modes, and discusses the implications for agencies that provide public and human services transportation. The research shows that despite frequent utilization of public transportation by job-seeking persons with disabilities, many are dissatisfied with public transportation. While satisfaction seems to be high regarding ADA-compliant vehicle equipment,...

    Transportation barriers are often cited as the primary reason for the discrepancy in employment rate between persons with disabilities and others. Yet little information is available about the transportation barriers and needs of persons with disabilities who are searching for employment. The primary objective of this descriptive paper is to share valuable information from a unique survey of persons with disabilities who are actively searching for employment in New Jersey. The paper examines the role of public transportation in providing job access to persons with disabilities. It provides information and insights on the availability, usage, needs, barriers, and perceptions of the survey respondents about different public transit modes, and discusses the implications for agencies that provide public and human services transportation. The research shows that despite frequent utilization of public transportation by job-seeking persons with disabilities, many are dissatisfied with public transportation. While satisfaction seems to be high regarding ADA-compliant vehicle equipment, many are dissatisfied with the level of transit service and environmental barriers between homes and transit stations/stops. It can be inferred from the results that a multitude of strategies will be needed to address the travel needs and barriers of job-seeking persons with disabilities in the state. In addition to assisting human services transportation planning and providing insights to vocational rehabilitation counselors, the observations in the study will be used to lay down the framework for more rigorous research on transportation needs and barriers of persons with disabilities. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Cortes, Alvaro; Lam, Ken; Fein, David
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2008

    In 1998, public housing agencies (PHAs) were given considerable discretion to select tenants on the basis of local PHA preferences rather than on old federal preferences for households experiencing housing-related hardships. Many PHAs have adopted other categorical preferences. As a result, the demographic profile and household composition of public housing tenants have changed. These changes have important implications for the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development’s Housing Choice Voucher Program (HCVP), because past research has found that household characteristics and location factors significantly affect a household’s length of stay in the program. The study described in this article uses administrative data to explore the factors associated with a household’s length of stay in the HCVP. The study focuses on the degree to which the presence of children of varying ages affects a household’s length of stay in the program and the degree to which older children, as a potential source of childcare, may mitigate a longer duration of housing assistance. The study also...

    In 1998, public housing agencies (PHAs) were given considerable discretion to select tenants on the basis of local PHA preferences rather than on old federal preferences for households experiencing housing-related hardships. Many PHAs have adopted other categorical preferences. As a result, the demographic profile and household composition of public housing tenants have changed. These changes have important implications for the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development’s Housing Choice Voucher Program (HCVP), because past research has found that household characteristics and location factors significantly affect a household’s length of stay in the program. The study described in this article uses administrative data to explore the factors associated with a household’s length of stay in the HCVP. The study focuses on the degree to which the presence of children of varying ages affects a household’s length of stay in the program and the degree to which older children, as a potential source of childcare, may mitigate a longer duration of housing assistance. The study also explores the degree to which the disability status of the household head or children affects a household’s length of stay in the program. The study’s main finding is that the presence of an infant or a toddler increases a household’s length of stay in the HCVP, after controlling for an array of household and location characteristics, but the presence of other children in the same household attenuates this effect. Conversely, the study finds that the presence of teenagers, especially male teenagers, magnifies this effect. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Santiago, Catherine DeCarlo; Kaltman, Stacey; Miranda, Jeanne
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2013

    Poverty is associated with an increased risk for psychological problems. Even with this increased risk for mental health problems and need for care, many low-income adults and families do not receive treatment because of logistical, attitudinal, and systemic barriers. Despite significant barriers to obtaining care, research suggests that low-income individuals show significant benefit from evidence-based mental healthcare. In this article, we review the link between poverty and mental health, common barriers to obtaining mental health services, and treatment studies that have been conducted with low-income groups. Finally, we discuss the implications of the research reviewed and offer recommendations for clinicians working with low-income children or adults, highlighting the importance of evidence-based care, extensive outreach, and empathic respect. (author abstract)

    Poverty is associated with an increased risk for psychological problems. Even with this increased risk for mental health problems and need for care, many low-income adults and families do not receive treatment because of logistical, attitudinal, and systemic barriers. Despite significant barriers to obtaining care, research suggests that low-income individuals show significant benefit from evidence-based mental healthcare. In this article, we review the link between poverty and mental health, common barriers to obtaining mental health services, and treatment studies that have been conducted with low-income groups. Finally, we discuss the implications of the research reviewed and offer recommendations for clinicians working with low-income children or adults, highlighting the importance of evidence-based care, extensive outreach, and empathic respect. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Wittenburg, David; Fraker, Thomas; Stapleton, David; Thornton, Craig; Gregory, Jesse; Mamun, Arif
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2007

    This paper presents estimates of Ticket to Work's (TTW) impacts on service enrollment, earnings, and benefit amounts during the first two years of program implementation in Phases 1 and 2 states. We estimated impacts using a longitudinal fixed effects model that tracked changes in outcomes of 4.7 million beneficiaries with disabilities covering the period from the year before the Phase 1 Ticket mailing in 2001 and continuing through the end of 2003. Our impact estimates indicate that TTW had a small impact on promoting service enrollment during the first year of TTW rollout. We find no compelling evidence that TTW affected beneficiary earnings and benefits during its first two years. Our impact findings for all outcomes are consistent with the expectation that changes in service enrollment would occur before changes in either earnings or benefit receipt. Additionally, the relatively small size of the service enrollment impacts is consistent with the low TTW participation rate, which was less than 1 percent during the first year of the rollout in Phase 1. Given the anticipated...

    This paper presents estimates of Ticket to Work's (TTW) impacts on service enrollment, earnings, and benefit amounts during the first two years of program implementation in Phases 1 and 2 states. We estimated impacts using a longitudinal fixed effects model that tracked changes in outcomes of 4.7 million beneficiaries with disabilities covering the period from the year before the Phase 1 Ticket mailing in 2001 and continuing through the end of 2003. Our impact estimates indicate that TTW had a small impact on promoting service enrollment during the first year of TTW rollout. We find no compelling evidence that TTW affected beneficiary earnings and benefits during its first two years. Our impact findings for all outcomes are consistent with the expectation that changes in service enrollment would occur before changes in either earnings or benefit receipt. Additionally, the relatively small size of the service enrollment impacts is consistent with the low TTW participation rate, which was less than 1 percent during the first year of the rollout in Phase 1. Given the anticipated timing of impacts and the relatively small size of the service enrollment impacts, it is not surprising that we find no compelling evidence of subsequent impacts on earnings and benefit amounts at this early stage. (author abstract)

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