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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: Cortes, Alvaro; Lam, Ken; Fein, David
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2008

    In 1998, public housing agencies (PHAs) were given considerable discretion to select tenants on the basis of local PHA preferences rather than on old federal preferences for households experiencing housing-related hardships. Many PHAs have adopted other categorical preferences. As a result, the demographic profile and household composition of public housing tenants have changed. These changes have important implications for the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development’s Housing Choice Voucher Program (HCVP), because past research has found that household characteristics and location factors significantly affect a household’s length of stay in the program. The study described in this article uses administrative data to explore the factors associated with a household’s length of stay in the HCVP. The study focuses on the degree to which the presence of children of varying ages affects a household’s length of stay in the program and the degree to which older children, as a potential source of childcare, may mitigate a longer duration of housing assistance. The study also...

    In 1998, public housing agencies (PHAs) were given considerable discretion to select tenants on the basis of local PHA preferences rather than on old federal preferences for households experiencing housing-related hardships. Many PHAs have adopted other categorical preferences. As a result, the demographic profile and household composition of public housing tenants have changed. These changes have important implications for the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development’s Housing Choice Voucher Program (HCVP), because past research has found that household characteristics and location factors significantly affect a household’s length of stay in the program. The study described in this article uses administrative data to explore the factors associated with a household’s length of stay in the HCVP. The study focuses on the degree to which the presence of children of varying ages affects a household’s length of stay in the program and the degree to which older children, as a potential source of childcare, may mitigate a longer duration of housing assistance. The study also explores the degree to which the disability status of the household head or children affects a household’s length of stay in the program. The study’s main finding is that the presence of an infant or a toddler increases a household’s length of stay in the HCVP, after controlling for an array of household and location characteristics, but the presence of other children in the same household attenuates this effect. Conversely, the study finds that the presence of teenagers, especially male teenagers, magnifies this effect. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Gould-Werth, Alix; Shaefer, H. Luke
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2012

    Among unemployed workers, the less educated and racial and ethnic minorities are less likely than the highly educated and White non-Hispanics to apply for and to receive unemployment insurance benefits; those who are less educated are also far more likely to perceive themselves as ineligible for benefits for monetary reasons. (author abstract)

    Among unemployed workers, the less educated and racial and ethnic minorities are less likely than the highly educated and White non-Hispanics to apply for and to receive unemployment insurance benefits; those who are less educated are also far more likely to perceive themselves as ineligible for benefits for monetary reasons. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: McConnell, Sheena; Ohls, James
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2001

    The Food Stamp Program is a cornerstone of America’s federally administered nutrition assistance to those in need. While the program serves a predominantly urban population, nearly a quarter of food stamp recipients live in rural areas and they receive just under a quarter of all food stamp benefits. In a recent study of rural-urban differences in food stamp participation, researchers found that the number of people eligible to receive food stamps declined in both urban and rural areas between 1996 and 1998. However, the participation rate—the proportion of people eligible for food stamps who participate in the program—declined in urban areas, but not in rural areas. (author abstract)

    The Food Stamp Program is a cornerstone of America’s federally administered nutrition assistance to those in need. While the program serves a predominantly urban population, nearly a quarter of food stamp recipients live in rural areas and they receive just under a quarter of all food stamp benefits. In a recent study of rural-urban differences in food stamp participation, researchers found that the number of people eligible to receive food stamps declined in both urban and rural areas between 1996 and 1998. However, the participation rate—the proportion of people eligible for food stamps who participate in the program—declined in urban areas, but not in rural areas. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Kim, Jeounghee; Joo, Myungkook
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2009

    How much did single mothers on Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) work after welfare reform? Has their work participation stopped increasing recently? Since the U.S. Federal Government established mandatory work requirements for most TANF recipients and minimum annual work participation rates for States in the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act (PRWORA) of 1996, welfare recipients' participation in work-related activities became the central issue among both policymakers and researchers. Under the law, an adult TANF recipient generally is required to participate in "core" and "supplementary" work activities for at least 30 hours per week. In response to PRWORA's requirement that recipients participate in work-related activities, there was a dramatic increase in adult welfare recipients' work activities, and the share of adults on Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) or TANF who were engaged in work-related activities for at least 1 hour per week in a typical month rose from 22.4 percent in 1996 to 43.1 percent in 2001. Many...

    How much did single mothers on Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) work after welfare reform? Has their work participation stopped increasing recently? Since the U.S. Federal Government established mandatory work requirements for most TANF recipients and minimum annual work participation rates for States in the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act (PRWORA) of 1996, welfare recipients' participation in work-related activities became the central issue among both policymakers and researchers. Under the law, an adult TANF recipient generally is required to participate in "core" and "supplementary" work activities for at least 30 hours per week. In response to PRWORA's requirement that recipients participate in work-related activities, there was a dramatic increase in adult welfare recipients' work activities, and the share of adults on Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) or TANF who were engaged in work-related activities for at least 1 hour per week in a typical month rose from 22.4 percent in 1996 to 43.1 percent in 2001. Many supporters of welfare reform viewed this increase in work participation as strong evidence of the success of PRWORA. In 2002, however, the weekly work participation rate decreased to 41.7 percent and then went to 41.2 percent in 2003 as the country's economy struggled to recover from the 2001 recession.

    This study finds that when consistent measures are used to calculate data on paid employment and other work-related activities of single mothers on TANF, the resulting rates of employment and participation in work-related activities are higher than those initially reported. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Lino, Mark
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 1998

    A large proportion of the poor in the United States is composed of single mothers and their children. Many of these women receive partial child support payment or none at all. Welfare reform legislation has, therefore, focused on child support payment enforcement. However, the economic well-being of single-parent families can be improved only if child support payments are paid on a regular basis and reflect the cost of raising children. Comparing USDA estimates of expenditures on children with average full child support payments, which represent average child support awards, shows that these full payments cover a small proportion of the total cost of raising children. Therefore, to improve the economic well-being of single-mother families, child support enforcement plus child support awards that reflect the cost of raising children are needed. (author abstract)

     

    A large proportion of the poor in the United States is composed of single mothers and their children. Many of these women receive partial child support payment or none at all. Welfare reform legislation has, therefore, focused on child support payment enforcement. However, the economic well-being of single-parent families can be improved only if child support payments are paid on a regular basis and reflect the cost of raising children. Comparing USDA estimates of expenditures on children with average full child support payments, which represent average child support awards, shows that these full payments cover a small proportion of the total cost of raising children. Therefore, to improve the economic well-being of single-mother families, child support enforcement plus child support awards that reflect the cost of raising children are needed. (author abstract)

     

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