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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

  • Conduct a search and filter parameters as desired.
  • "Check" the box next to the resources for which you would like a citation.
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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Latimer, Melissa; Plein, Christopher
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2013

    This study compares administrative and caseworker perspectives on service delivery processes in rural areas in an Appalachian state with high levels of poverty and unemployment and limited economic resources for investment and development. The focus of this study is on the implementation of West Virginia Works, West Virginia’s public assistance program that was adopted in response to new federal welfare law enacted in 1996. The data source used in this research comes from focus groups with approximately 80 caseworkers and 5 West Virginia Department of Health and Human Resources administrators with key knowledge of welfare reform in West Virginia. Implications for service delivery and public policy are discussed. (author abstract)

    This study compares administrative and caseworker perspectives on service delivery processes in rural areas in an Appalachian state with high levels of poverty and unemployment and limited economic resources for investment and development. The focus of this study is on the implementation of West Virginia Works, West Virginia’s public assistance program that was adopted in response to new federal welfare law enacted in 1996. The data source used in this research comes from focus groups with approximately 80 caseworkers and 5 West Virginia Department of Health and Human Resources administrators with key knowledge of welfare reform in West Virginia. Implications for service delivery and public policy are discussed. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Hetling, Andrea; Botein, Hilary
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2010

    Program fidelity to initial design is a critical measure in implementation research and often considered an important element of program success. This approach assumes that a program's initial design is immune to the influence of external forces and is based entirely on sound evidence, theory, and practice. Using a permanent supportive housing program for domestic violence victims as a case study, this research examines how external influences may affect program theory and design and evaluates whether such influences are perceived as opportunities or barriers by program administrators. Findings, based on document review, stakeholder interviews, and focus groups, reveal that funding and physical site characteristics, and to a lesser degree, community support and professional standards, were important external influences. Both opportunities and barriers affected program design, but these effects differed in timing and degree. (author abstract)

    Program fidelity to initial design is a critical measure in implementation research and often considered an important element of program success. This approach assumes that a program's initial design is immune to the influence of external forces and is based entirely on sound evidence, theory, and practice. Using a permanent supportive housing program for domestic violence victims as a case study, this research examines how external influences may affect program theory and design and evaluates whether such influences are perceived as opportunities or barriers by program administrators. Findings, based on document review, stakeholder interviews, and focus groups, reveal that funding and physical site characteristics, and to a lesser degree, community support and professional standards, were important external influences. Both opportunities and barriers affected program design, but these effects differed in timing and degree. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Handa, Sudhanshu; Davis, Benjamin
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2006

    This paper discusses the experience of six conditional cash transfer programs in Latin America, a model of social safety nets which have grown to dominate the social protection sector in the region over the last 10 years. We find that while conditional cash transfer programs have generally been successful in terms of reaching their core objective, it is still not clear whether they constitute the most cost efficient or sustainable solution to the development bottleneck they seek to address. Further, the almost exclusive focus on human capital accumulation of children leads to missed opportunities in terms of impact on household welfare and the broader rural development context. (author abstract)

    This paper discusses the experience of six conditional cash transfer programs in Latin America, a model of social safety nets which have grown to dominate the social protection sector in the region over the last 10 years. We find that while conditional cash transfer programs have generally been successful in terms of reaching their core objective, it is still not clear whether they constitute the most cost efficient or sustainable solution to the development bottleneck they seek to address. Further, the almost exclusive focus on human capital accumulation of children leads to missed opportunities in terms of impact on household welfare and the broader rural development context. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Fischer, Robert L.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2000

    Homeless families face the economic and personal challenges of sparse employment opportunities and child care and nutrition needs, compounded by the loss of adequate housing. The Family Development Center (FDC) is a transitional housing program in Atlanta, Georgia, designed to provide young homeless mothers an opportunity to emerge from what may well be desperate circumstances and begin the journey to economic self-sufficiency. This paper describes the research on programs for homeless families and presents the results of a comprehensive look at the operation and effectiveness of the FDC program during its first 5 years of existence. The work shows that while many families were able to effect notable positive changes in their lives during and after taking part in the housing program. for some the recovery from homelessness was extremely difficult. For even the most successful formerly homeless families-those that secured employment, housing, and other social supports-the escape from welfare dependence and poverty proved very difficult. The paper concludes with a discussion of...

    Homeless families face the economic and personal challenges of sparse employment opportunities and child care and nutrition needs, compounded by the loss of adequate housing. The Family Development Center (FDC) is a transitional housing program in Atlanta, Georgia, designed to provide young homeless mothers an opportunity to emerge from what may well be desperate circumstances and begin the journey to economic self-sufficiency. This paper describes the research on programs for homeless families and presents the results of a comprehensive look at the operation and effectiveness of the FDC program during its first 5 years of existence. The work shows that while many families were able to effect notable positive changes in their lives during and after taking part in the housing program. for some the recovery from homelessness was extremely difficult. For even the most successful formerly homeless families-those that secured employment, housing, and other social supports-the escape from welfare dependence and poverty proved very difficult. The paper concludes with a discussion of the implications for relevant public policy. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Kleit, Rachel Garshick
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2004

    This article evaluates an experimental public housing self-sufficiency program that encourages home ownership among low-income families. A quasi-experimental design, in combination with focus groups, records review, and key informant interviews, provides data to focus on four questions: (a) Do these programs simply accelerate move-outs for those who would have left without intervention? (b) Are program elements replicable given the importance of the local context in public housing move-outs? (c) How do housing authorities resolve tensions that arise between housing management and social service delivery? (d) What should housing authority response be to those who fail? (author abstract)

    This article evaluates an experimental public housing self-sufficiency program that encourages home ownership among low-income families. A quasi-experimental design, in combination with focus groups, records review, and key informant interviews, provides data to focus on four questions: (a) Do these programs simply accelerate move-outs for those who would have left without intervention? (b) Are program elements replicable given the importance of the local context in public housing move-outs? (c) How do housing authorities resolve tensions that arise between housing management and social service delivery? (d) What should housing authority response be to those who fail? (author abstract)

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