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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: Gennetian, Lisa A.; Ludwig, Jens; McDade, Thomas; Sanbonmatsu, Lisa
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2013

    In 1987 sociologist William Julius Wilson published his influential book The Truly Disadvantaged, which argued that the growing geographic concentration of poor minority families in urban areas contributed to high rates of crime, out-of-wedlock births, female-headed families, and welfare dependency. The exodus of black working- and middle-class families during the 1960s and 1970s from inner-city areas had adverse effects on the poor families left behind in high-poverty areas, Wilson suggested, by eliminating a “social buffer” that helped “keep alive the perception that education is meaningful, that steady employment is a viable alternative to welfare, and that family stability is the norm, not the exception” (p. 49). Our research on the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development’s (HUD) Moving to Opportunity (MTO) randomized mobility experiment raises questions about whether Wilson was right about the effects of concentrated poverty on the earnings, welfare receipt, or schooling outcomes of low-income families living in such areas. But MTO suggests concentrated poverty does...

    In 1987 sociologist William Julius Wilson published his influential book The Truly Disadvantaged, which argued that the growing geographic concentration of poor minority families in urban areas contributed to high rates of crime, out-of-wedlock births, female-headed families, and welfare dependency. The exodus of black working- and middle-class families during the 1960s and 1970s from inner-city areas had adverse effects on the poor families left behind in high-poverty areas, Wilson suggested, by eliminating a “social buffer” that helped “keep alive the perception that education is meaningful, that steady employment is a viable alternative to welfare, and that family stability is the norm, not the exception” (p. 49). Our research on the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development’s (HUD) Moving to Opportunity (MTO) randomized mobility experiment raises questions about whether Wilson was right about the effects of concentrated poverty on the earnings, welfare receipt, or schooling outcomes of low-income families living in such areas. But MTO suggests concentrated poverty does have extremely important impacts on outcomes not emphasized so much by Wilson – such as physical and mental health. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Alexander, Karl (ed.); Morgan, Stephen L. (ed.)
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2016

    Table of Contents

    The Coleman Report at Fifty: Its Legacy and Implications for Future Research on Equality of Opportunity

    Karl Alexander and Stephen L. Morgan

    Part I. The Legacy of EEO and Current Patterns of Educational Inequality

    Is It Family or School? Getting the Question Right

    Karl Alexander

    School Segregation and Racial Academic Achievement Gaps

    Sean F. Reardon

    Racial and Ethnic Gaps in Postsecondary Aspirations and Enrollment

    Barbara Schneider and Guan Saw

    Still No Effect of Resources, Even in the New Gilded Age?

    Stephen L. Morgan and Sol Bee Jung

    First- and Second-Order Methodological Developments from the Coleman Report

    Samuel R. Lucas

    Part II. Looking to the Future

    Educational Equality Is a Multifaceted Issue: Why We Must Understand the School's Sociocultural Context for Student Achievement

    Prudence L. Carter

    What If Coleman Had Known About...

    Table of Contents

    The Coleman Report at Fifty: Its Legacy and Implications for Future Research on Equality of Opportunity

    Karl Alexander and Stephen L. Morgan

    Part I. The Legacy of EEO and Current Patterns of Educational Inequality

    Is It Family or School? Getting the Question Right

    Karl Alexander

    School Segregation and Racial Academic Achievement Gaps

    Sean F. Reardon

    Racial and Ethnic Gaps in Postsecondary Aspirations and Enrollment

    Barbara Schneider and Guan Saw

    Still No Effect of Resources, Even in the New Gilded Age?

    Stephen L. Morgan and Sol Bee Jung

    First- and Second-Order Methodological Developments from the Coleman Report

    Samuel R. Lucas

    Part II. Looking to the Future

    Educational Equality Is a Multifaceted Issue: Why We Must Understand the School's Sociocultural Context for Student Achievement

    Prudence L. Carter

    What If Coleman Had Known About Stereotype Threat? How Social-Psychological Theory Can Help Mitigate Educational Inequality

    Geoffrey D. Borman and Jaymes Pyne

    A New Framework for Understanding Parental Involvement: Setting the Stage for Academic Success

    Angel L. Harris and Keith Robinson

    Necessary but Not Sufficient: The Role of Policy for Advancing Programs of School, Family, and Community Partnerships

    Joyce L. Epstein and Steven B. Sheldon

    Accountability, Inequality, and Achievement: The Effects of the No Child Left Behind Act on Multiple Measures of Student Learning

    Jennifer L. Jennings and Douglas Lee Lauen

    Can Technology Help Promote Equality of Educational Opportunities?

    Brian Jacob, Dan Berger, Cassandra Hart, and Susanna Loeb

    Connecting Research and Policy to Reduce Inequality 

    Ruth N. López Turley

  • Individual Author: Murphy, Jane C.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2005

    This Article analyzes the issue of paternity disestablishment, an issue courts and legislatures have been struggling with over the last several years. For a variety of reasons explored in this Article, an increasing number of fathers have filed requests to set aside paternity orders seeking to be relieved of the legal obligations of fatherhood. As a result families have been destabilized and children are becoming fatherless. The implications for the future of the family are profound. Although some scholars have examined this phenomenon, none have addressed the link between paternity disestablishment and welfare reform.

    This Article explores the law's evolving definition of fatherhood and concludes that the law's response to the paternity disestablishment crisis threatens to impose a narrow definition of fatherhood based on biology. This new definition of fatherhood has not developed to serve any of the traditional goals of family law, protecting children and preserving family stability. Rather, this trend appears to be one of the unintended consequences of two decades of...

    This Article analyzes the issue of paternity disestablishment, an issue courts and legislatures have been struggling with over the last several years. For a variety of reasons explored in this Article, an increasing number of fathers have filed requests to set aside paternity orders seeking to be relieved of the legal obligations of fatherhood. As a result families have been destabilized and children are becoming fatherless. The implications for the future of the family are profound. Although some scholars have examined this phenomenon, none have addressed the link between paternity disestablishment and welfare reform.

    This Article explores the law's evolving definition of fatherhood and concludes that the law's response to the paternity disestablishment crisis threatens to impose a narrow definition of fatherhood based on biology. This new definition of fatherhood has not developed to serve any of the traditional goals of family law, protecting children and preserving family stability. Rather, this trend appears to be one of the unintended consequences of two decades of federal and state policy designed to reform the nation's welfare system. The broad goals of these policies may be well founded. But modern child support enforcement policy, so central to welfare reform and aimed most aggressively against low income fathers, is pushing fathers to seek disestablishment of paternity. In response, courts and legislatures are reinstating a construct of paternal functions defined in economic terms and grounded in biology. This new definition of fatherhood ignores other bases for fatherhood based on marriage, care taking or both. As a result, the state's interests in collecting child support, protecting children and preserving families are undermined by the very laws that should protect those interests. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Bouman, John M.; Stapleton, Margaret; McKee, Deb
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2003

    Work participation rates may become stricter after Congress reauthorizes Temporary Assistance for Needy Families, the welfare program mandated in 1996. States may have to adjust their programs to comply with the federal requirements and create work incentives for recipients. Maintaining state programming flexibility with state cash assistance, work supports, time-limit relief, income disregards, and other methods is critical to working recipients' adequate support. (author abstract)

    Work participation rates may become stricter after Congress reauthorizes Temporary Assistance for Needy Families, the welfare program mandated in 1996. States may have to adjust their programs to comply with the federal requirements and create work incentives for recipients. Maintaining state programming flexibility with state cash assistance, work supports, time-limit relief, income disregards, and other methods is critical to working recipients' adequate support. (author abstract)

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