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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Vinokur, Amiram D.; van Ryn, Michelle; Gramlich, Edward M.; Price, RIchard H.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 1991

    Results are reported from a 2 1/2 year follow-up of respondents who participated in a randomized field experiment that included the Jobs Program, a preventive intervention for unemployed persons. The intervention was intended to prevent poor mental health and loss of motivation to seek reemployment and to promote high-quality reemployment. The results of the long-term follow-up were consistent with those found 1 and 4 months after intervention (Caplan, Vinokur, Price, & van Ryn, 1989). The results demonstrate the continued beneficial effects of the intervention on monthly earnings, level of employment, and episodes of employer and job changes. These findings are supported by a benefit-cost analysis, which demonstrates large net benefits of the intervention to the participants and to the federal and state government programs that supported the project. (author abstract)

    Results are reported from a 2 1/2 year follow-up of respondents who participated in a randomized field experiment that included the Jobs Program, a preventive intervention for unemployed persons. The intervention was intended to prevent poor mental health and loss of motivation to seek reemployment and to promote high-quality reemployment. The results of the long-term follow-up were consistent with those found 1 and 4 months after intervention (Caplan, Vinokur, Price, & van Ryn, 1989). The results demonstrate the continued beneficial effects of the intervention on monthly earnings, level of employment, and episodes of employer and job changes. These findings are supported by a benefit-cost analysis, which demonstrates large net benefits of the intervention to the participants and to the federal and state government programs that supported the project. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Gibson-Davis, Christina M.; Magnuson, Katherine; Gennetian, Lisa A; Duncan, Greg J.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2005

    This paper uses data from 2 randomized evaluations of welfare-to-work programs—the Minnesota Family Investment Program and the National Evaluation of Welfare-to-Work Strategies—to estimate the effect of employment on domestic abuse among low-income single mothers. Unique to our analysis is the application of a 2-stage least squares method, in which random assignment enables us to control for omitted characteristics that might otherwise confound the association between employment and domestic abuse. We find that increased maternal employment decreases subsequent reports of domestic abuse in both studies. In the Minnesota Family Investment Program—a program with an enhanced income disregard that allowed welfare mothers to keep a portion of their welfare income as earnings rose—an increase in household incomes appears to have contributed to reductions in reports of domestic abuse. (author abstract)

    This paper uses data from 2 randomized evaluations of welfare-to-work programs—the Minnesota Family Investment Program and the National Evaluation of Welfare-to-Work Strategies—to estimate the effect of employment on domestic abuse among low-income single mothers. Unique to our analysis is the application of a 2-stage least squares method, in which random assignment enables us to control for omitted characteristics that might otherwise confound the association between employment and domestic abuse. We find that increased maternal employment decreases subsequent reports of domestic abuse in both studies. In the Minnesota Family Investment Program—a program with an enhanced income disregard that allowed welfare mothers to keep a portion of their welfare income as earnings rose—an increase in household incomes appears to have contributed to reductions in reports of domestic abuse. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Alderson, Desiree Principe; Gennetian, Lisa A. ; Dowsett, Chantelle J. ; Imes, Amy; Huston, Aletha C.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2008

    This study examines how welfare and employment policies affect subpopulations of low-income families that have different levels of initial disadvantage. Education, prior earnings, and welfare receipt are used to measure disadvantage. The analysis of data from experiments suggests that employment-based programs have no effects on economic well-being among the least-disadvantaged low-income, single-parent families, but they have positive effects on employment and income for the most-disadvantaged and moderately disadvantaged families. These programs increase school achievement and enrollment in center-based child care of children only in moderately disadvantaged families. The most-disadvantaged families are found to increase use of child care that is not center based. Parents in these families experience depressive symptoms and aggravation. The findings raise questions about how to support families at the lowest end of the economic spectrum. (author abstract)

    This study examines how welfare and employment policies affect subpopulations of low-income families that have different levels of initial disadvantage. Education, prior earnings, and welfare receipt are used to measure disadvantage. The analysis of data from experiments suggests that employment-based programs have no effects on economic well-being among the least-disadvantaged low-income, single-parent families, but they have positive effects on employment and income for the most-disadvantaged and moderately disadvantaged families. These programs increase school achievement and enrollment in center-based child care of children only in moderately disadvantaged families. The most-disadvantaged families are found to increase use of child care that is not center based. Parents in these families experience depressive symptoms and aggravation. The findings raise questions about how to support families at the lowest end of the economic spectrum. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Yoshikawa, Hirokazu; Gassman-Pines, Anna; Morris, Pamela A.; Gennetian, Lisa A.; Godfrey, Erin B.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2010

    This study examined whether the effects of employment-based policies on children’s math and reading achievement differed for African American, Latino and Caucasian children of welfare receiving parents, and if so, why. Two kinds of employment policies were examined: education-first programs with an emphasis on adult education and job training; and work-first programs with an emphasis on immediate employment. With data from two- and five-year follow-ups in four experimental demonstrations in Grand Rapids, Michigan (N=591) and Riverside County, California (N=629), there was evidence of small positive effects of the Grand Rapids and Riverside education-first programs on African American and Latino children’s school readiness and math scores. An opposite pattern of effects emerged among Caucasian children. In one of the two sites, we found that Latino parents’ higher levels of goals for pursuing their own education appeared to explain why their children benefited to a greater degree from the program than their Caucasian counterparts. (author abstract)

    This study examined whether the effects of employment-based policies on children’s math and reading achievement differed for African American, Latino and Caucasian children of welfare receiving parents, and if so, why. Two kinds of employment policies were examined: education-first programs with an emphasis on adult education and job training; and work-first programs with an emphasis on immediate employment. With data from two- and five-year follow-ups in four experimental demonstrations in Grand Rapids, Michigan (N=591) and Riverside County, California (N=629), there was evidence of small positive effects of the Grand Rapids and Riverside education-first programs on African American and Latino children’s school readiness and math scores. An opposite pattern of effects emerged among Caucasian children. In one of the two sites, we found that Latino parents’ higher levels of goals for pursuing their own education appeared to explain why their children benefited to a greater degree from the program than their Caucasian counterparts. (author abstract)

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